I Didn't Know That

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by Beyond » Thu Aug 22, 2013 2:50 am

Scientists finally discover how elephants can make low sounds that other elephants can pick up 6 miles (10 kilometers) away.
http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2012/0 ... ure-it-out
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by geckzilla » Thu Aug 22, 2013 2:57 am

I refuse to patronize csmonitor.com... You should read about christian science.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by neufer » Thu Aug 22, 2013 3:34 am

geckzilla wrote:
I refuse to patronize csmonitor.com... You should read about christian science.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Christian_Science_Monitor wrote:
<<Despite its name, The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) does not claim to be a religious-themed paper, and says it does not promote the doctrine of its patron church. The paper has been known for avoiding sensationalism, producing a "distinctive brand of nonhysterical journalism". In 1997, the Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, a publication critical of United States policy in the Middle East, praised the Monitor for its objective and informative coverage of Islam and the Middle East.>>
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by geckzilla » Thu Aug 22, 2013 5:00 am

They can try to distance themselves from it all they want but it's still in their name and it gives me the chills. It is like calling your newspaper the The Apartheid Times and then saying it has nothing to do with it anymore while refusing to rename. I do appreciate their attempt to avoid sensationalism, though.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by stephen63 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 4:07 pm

geckzilla wrote:They can try to distance themselves from it all they want but it's still in their name and it gives me the chills. It is like calling your newspaper the The Apartheid Times and then saying it has nothing to do with it anymore while refusing to rename. I do appreciate their attempt to avoid sensationalism, though.
You can change the name all you want but the dogma remains.

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by neufer » Fri Aug 23, 2013 4:37 pm

stephen63 wrote:
geckzilla wrote:
They can try to distance themselves from it all they want but it's still in their name and it gives me the chills. It is like calling your newspaper the The Apartheid Times and then saying it has nothing to do with it anymore while refusing to rename. I do appreciate their attempt to avoid sensationalism, though.
You can change the name all you want but the dogma remains.
This is exactly like all those accusations of rampant voter fraud without a single example of same.

Can anyone provide us with a single example of bias in the Christian Science Monitor :?:
  • Bueller...Bueller...Bueller...
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by stephen63 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 4:44 pm

neufer wrote:
stephen63 wrote:
geckzilla wrote:
They can try to distance themselves from it all they want but it's still in their name and it gives me the chills. It is like calling your newspaper the The Apartheid Times and then saying it has nothing to do with it anymore while refusing to rename. I do appreciate their attempt to avoid sensationalism, though.
You can change the name all you want but the dogma remains.
This is exactly like all those accusations of rampant voter fraud without a single example of same.

Can anyone provide us with a single example of bias in the Christian Science Monitor :?:
  • Bueller...Bueller...Bueller...
Whoa, back up the truck, Art. Who said there was bias?

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by stephen63 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 5:10 pm

neufer wrote: This is exactly like all those accusations of rampant voter fraud without a single example of same.
  • Bueller...Bueller...Bueller...
OK, here's ONE
Poll worker gets 5-year sentence for voter fraud

Read more: http://www.wlwt.com/news/local-news/cin ... z2coQu25Vf

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by neufer » Fri Aug 23, 2013 5:51 pm

stephen63 wrote:
neufer wrote:
stephen63 wrote:
You can change the name all you want but the dogma remains.
This is exactly like all those accusations of rampant voter fraud without a single example of same.

Can anyone provide us with a single example of bias in the Christian Science Monitor :?:
Whoa, back up the truck, Art. Who said there was bias?
  • "Dogma" implies bias.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogma wrote:
<<Dogma is a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true. It serves as part of the primary basis of an ideology or belief system, and it cannot be changed or discarded without affecting the very system's paradigm, or the ideology itself. The term derives from Greek δόγμα "that which seems to one, opinion or belief" and that from δοκέω (dokeo), "to think, to suppose, to imagine".>>
stephen63 wrote:
OK, here's ONE: Poll worker gets 5-year sentence for voter fraud

Read more: http://www.wlwt.com/news/local-news/cin ... z2coQu25Vf
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rampant#Rampant wrote:
<<A beast rampant (Old French: "rearing up") is depicted in profile standing erect with forepaws raised. The position of the hind legs varies according to local custom: the lion may stand on both hind legs, braced wide apart, or on only one, with the other also raised to strike; the word rampant is sometimes omitted, especially in early blazon, as this is the most usual position of a carnivorous quadruped. Note: the term segreant denotes the same position, but is only used in reference to griffins and dragons.>>
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by stephen63 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 6:38 pm

[quote="neufer"]
  • "Dogma" implies bias.
Perhaps the word doctrine is more applicable?
I didn't look to see what the doctrine is for the spaghetti people. Should they be given the same deference(or lack thereof) as Christianity? Apparently, they are even a 501(c)(3) organization. I've seen plenty of posts here espousing the virtues of the spaghetti people, and yet vilifying any form of religion.

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by neufer » Fri Aug 23, 2013 6:44 pm

stephen63 wrote:
I didn't look to see what the doctrine is for the spaghetti people. Should they be given the same deference(or lack thereof) as Christianity? Apparently, they are even a 501(c)(3) organization. I've seen plenty of posts here espousing the virtues of the spaghetti people, and yet vilifying any form of religion.
  • Any other form of religion.
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by Beyond » Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:54 pm

To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by geckzilla » Fri Aug 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Art, it's not the Christian part or the idea of any bias in their reporting. Before I learned what Christian Science was I used to prefer their articles because they are usually quite good as far as media goes. I also like Al Jazeera. It's the two words "Christian Science" together which causes my aversion. Christian Scientists are apparently some of the nicest people you could meet but I would fear for the life and well-being of any person who happens to be born to a family of them and who also happens to encounter some kind of condition that requires medical intervention. I simply can't abide an organization which seems so outwardly rational with a rotten core. Anyway, I felt betrayed. Maybe I am the one being irrational but I guess it's a personal problem if so.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by neufer » Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:55 pm

geckzilla wrote:
Art, it's not the Christian part or the idea of any bias in their reporting. Before I learned what Christian Science was I used to prefer their articles because they are usually quite good as far as media goes. I also like Al Jazeera. It's the two words "Christian Science" together which causes my aversion. Christian Scientists are apparently some of the nicest people you could meet but I would fear for the life and well-being of any person who happens to be born to a family of them and who also happens to encounter some kind of condition that requires medical intervention.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_Science#Avoidance_of_vaccination wrote:
<<In 1900 Mary Baker Eddy (1821–1910) issued advice to adherents: "Rather than quarrel over vaccination I recommend that if the law demand an individual to submit to this process he obey the law and then appeal to the gospel to save him from any bad results." In 1902 she added, in the Christian Science Sentinel, that Christian Scientists should report contagious diseases to health boards when the law required it. The Christian Science Monitor was founded by Eddy in 1908 under the slogan: "To injure no man, but to bless all mankind."

Paul Vitello wrote in the New York Times in 2010 that the church now seeks to present Christian Science healing as a supplement to conventional medical care, similar to biofeedback, chiropractic and homeopathy.>>
geckzilla wrote:
I simply can't abide an organization which seems so outwardly rational with a rotten core. Anyway, I felt betrayed.
But the Flying Spaghetti Monster has rotini as its DNA !

"Our Pasta, who "Arghh" in the colander, Swallowed be thy sauce. Thy serving come, Thy strands be wrung, On forks as they are on spoons. Give us this day our garlic bread, And forgive us our starchiness, As we swashbuckle, splice the main-brace and cuss, And lead us not into Kraft parmessan, But deliver us from Chef Boy-Ar-Dee, For thine are Meatballs, and the beer, and the strippers, for ever and ever. R'Amen."
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by Beyond » Sat Sep 07, 2013 2:48 pm

Reflected sunlight from London skyscraper melts car. (Not really, but that's how they put it.)
http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/03/world/eur ... f=obinsite
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by geckzilla » Sat Sep 07, 2013 2:56 pm

The developers have been in touch with local businesses and have arranged with local authorities for three parking spaces which may be affected to be suspended, it said.
There is no worse sin in a big city.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by Beyond » Sat Sep 07, 2013 3:22 pm

Apparently it happens in a few places, but this is the first time I've run across it. IF one ever finds oneself in a big glare... MOVE :!: :!:
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by Beyond » Sun Sep 08, 2013 2:27 am

One of Solar System's Largest Volcanoes Is Under The Pacific Ocean.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/williampent ... fic-ocean/
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by makc » Wed Sep 11, 2013 7:19 pm

that reminds me to go watch pacific rim

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by Beyond » Fri Sep 13, 2013 12:31 am

1400 ton Molasses Spill in Hawaii.
http://gawker.com/1-400-ton-molasses-sp ... 1299979412

Image
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by neufer » Fri Sep 13, 2013 2:10 am

Beyond wrote:
1400 ton Molasses Spill in Hawaii.
<<Officials expect thousands of fish to die after a leak in Honolulu's molasses pipeline dumped more than 233,000 gallons of the sugary substance into the city's harbor on Monday. The spill has already killed hundreds of fish and other marine life in the harbor, and environmental experts predict it will soon spread to nearby reefs.>>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Molasses_Disaster wrote: <<The Boston Molasses Disaster, also known as the Great Molasses Flood and the Great Boston Molasses Tragedy, occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts in the United States. A large molasses storage tank containing as much as 2,300,000 gallons burst, and a wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph, killing 21 and injuring 150. The event has entered local folklore, and for many decades residents claimed that on hot summer days, the area still smelled of molasses.

The disaster occurred at the Purity Distilling Company facility on January 15, 1919. The temperature had risen above 40˚ F, climbing rapidly from the frigid temperatures of the preceding days. At the time, molasses was the standard sweetener in the United States. Molasses can also be fermented to produce rum and ethanol, the active ingredient in other alcoholic beverages and a key component in the manufacturing of munitions. The stored molasses was awaiting transfer to the Purity plant situated between Willow Street and what is now named Evereteze Way, in Cambridge.

At about 12:30 in the afternoon near Keany Square, at 529 Commercial Street, a molasses tank 50 ft tall, 90 ft in diameter and containing as much as 2,300,000 US gal collapsed. Witnesses stated that as it collapsed, there was a loud rumbling sound, like a machine gun as the rivets shot out of the tank, and that the ground shook as if a train were passing by. The collapse unleashed a wave of molasses between 8 and 15 ft high, moving at 35 mph, and exerting a pressure of 2 ton/ft². The molasses wave was of sufficient force to damage the girders of the adjacent Boston Elevated Railway's Atlantic Avenue structure and tip a railroad car momentarily off the tracks. Author Stephen Puleo describes how nearby buildings were swept off their foundations and crushed. Several blocks were flooded to a depth of 2 to 3 feet. Puleo quotes a Boston Post report:

Molasses, waist deep, covered the street and swirled and bubbled about the wreckage ... Here and there struggled a form—whether it was animal or human being was impossible to tell. Only an upheaval, a thrashing about in the sticky mass, showed where any life was ... Horses died like so many flies on sticky fly-paper. The more they struggled, the deeper in the mess they were ensnared. Human beings—men and women—suffered likewise.

The Boston Globe reported that people "were picked up by a rush of air and hurled many feet." Others had debris hurled at them from the rush of sweet-smelling air. A truck was picked up and hurled into Boston Harbor. Approximately 150 were injured; 21 people and several horses were killed—some were crushed and drowned by the molasses. The wounded included people, horses, and dogs; coughing fits became one of the most common ailments after the initial blast. In a 1983 article for Smithsonian, Edwards Park wrote of one child's experience:

... Anthony di Stasio, walking homeward with his sisters from the Michelangelo School, was picked up by the wave and carried, tumbling on its crest, almost as though he were surfing. Then he grounded and the molasses rolled him like a pebble as the wave diminished. He heard his mother call his name and couldn't answer, his throat was so clogged with the smothering goo. He passed out, then opened his eyes to find three of his four sisters staring at him.

Some nurses from the Red Cross dove into the molasses, while others tended to the wounded, keeping them warm as well as keeping the exhausted workers fed. Many of these people worked through the night. The injured were so numerous that doctors and surgeons set up a makeshift hospital in a nearby building. Rescuers found it difficult to make their way through the syrup to help the victims. It took four days before they stopped searching for victims; many of the dead were so glazed over in molasses, they were hard to recognize. The harbor was brown with molasses until summer.

Several factors that occurred on that day and the previous days might have contributed to the disaster. The tank was constructed poorly and tested insufficiently. Due to fermentation occurring within the tank, carbon dioxide production might have raised the internal pressure. The rise in local temperatures that occurred over the previous day also would have assisted in building this pressure. Records show that the air temperature rose from 2°F to 41°F over that period. The failure occurred from a manhole cover near the base of the tank, and it is possible that a fatigue crack there grew to the point of criticality. The tank had been filled to capacity only eight times since it was built a few years previously, putting the walls under an intermittent, cyclical load. An inquiry after the disaster revealed that Arthur Jell, who oversaw the construction, neglected basic safety tests, such as filling the tank with water to check for leaks. When filled with molasses, the tank leaked so badly that it was painted brown to hide the leaks. Local residents collected leaked molasses for their homes.>>
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by BMAONE23 » Fri Sep 13, 2013 4:45 pm

neufer wrote:
Beyond wrote:
1400 ton Molasses Spill in Hawaii.
<<Officials expect thousands of fish to die after a leak in Honolulu's molasses pipeline dumped more than 233,000 gallons of the sugary substance into the city's harbor on Monday. The spill has already killed hundreds of fish and other marine life in the harbor, and environmental experts predict it will soon spread to nearby reefs.>>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Molasses_Disaster wrote: <<The Boston Molasses Disaster, also known as the Great Molasses Flood and the Great Boston Molasses Tragedy, occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts in the United States. A large molasses storage tank containing as much as 2,300,000 gallons burst, and a wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph, killing 21 and injuring 150. The event has entered local folklore, and for many decades residents claimed that on hot summer days, the area still smelled of molasses.

The disaster occurred at the Purity Distilling Company facility on January 15, 1919. The temperature had risen above 40˚ F, climbing rapidly from the frigid temperatures of the preceding days. At the time, molasses was the standard sweetener in the United States. Molasses can also be fermented to produce rum and ethanol, the active ingredient in other alcoholic beverages and a key component in the manufacturing of munitions. The stored molasses was awaiting transfer to the Purity plant situated between Willow Street and what is now named Evereteze Way, in Cambridge.

At about 12:30 in the afternoon near Keany Square, at 529 Commercial Street, a molasses tank 50 ft tall, 90 ft in diameter and containing as much as 2,300,000 US gal collapsed. Witnesses stated that as it collapsed, there was a loud rumbling sound, like a machine gun as the rivets shot out of the tank, and that the ground shook as if a train were passing by. The collapse unleashed a wave of molasses between 8 and 15 ft high, moving at 35 mph, and exerting a pressure of 2 ton/ft². The molasses wave was of sufficient force to damage the girders of the adjacent Boston Elevated Railway's Atlantic Avenue structure and tip a railroad car momentarily off the tracks. Author Stephen Puleo describes how nearby buildings were swept off their foundations and crushed. Several blocks were flooded to a depth of 2 to 3 feet. Puleo quotes a Boston Post report:

Molasses, waist deep, covered the street and swirled and bubbled about the wreckage ... Here and there struggled a form—whether it was animal or human being was impossible to tell. Only an upheaval, a thrashing about in the sticky mass, showed where any life was ... Horses died like so many flies on sticky fly-paper. The more they struggled, the deeper in the mess they were ensnared. Human beings—men and women—suffered likewise.

The Boston Globe reported that people "were picked up by a rush of air and hurled many feet." Others had debris hurled at them from the rush of sweet-smelling air. A truck was picked up and hurled into Boston Harbor. Approximately 150 were injured; 21 people and several horses were killed—some were crushed and drowned by the molasses. The wounded included people, horses, and dogs; coughing fits became one of the most common ailments after the initial blast. In a 1983 article for Smithsonian, Edwards Park wrote of one child's experience:

... Anthony di Stasio, walking homeward with his sisters from the Michelangelo School, was picked up by the wave and carried, tumbling on its crest, almost as though he were surfing. Then he grounded and the molasses rolled him like a pebble as the wave diminished. He heard his mother call his name and couldn't answer, his throat was so clogged with the smothering goo. He passed out, then opened his eyes to find three of his four sisters staring at him.

Some nurses from the Red Cross dove into the molasses, while others tended to the wounded, keeping them warm as well as keeping the exhausted workers fed. Many of these people worked through the night. The injured were so numerous that doctors and surgeons set up a makeshift hospital in a nearby building. Rescuers found it difficult to make their way through the syrup to help the victims. It took four days before they stopped searching for victims; many of the dead were so glazed over in molasses, they were hard to recognize. The harbor was brown with molasses until summer.

Several factors that occurred on that day and the previous days might have contributed to the disaster. The tank was constructed poorly and tested insufficiently. Due to fermentation occurring within the tank, carbon dioxide production might have raised the internal pressure. The rise in local temperatures that occurred over the previous day also would have assisted in building this pressure. Records show that the air temperature rose from 2°F to 41°F over that period. The failure occurred from a manhole cover near the base of the tank, and it is possible that a fatigue crack there grew to the point of criticality. The tank had been filled to capacity only eight times since it was built a few years previously, putting the walls under an intermittent, cyclical load. An inquiry after the disaster revealed that Arthur Jell, who oversaw the construction, neglected basic safety tests, such as filling the tank with water to check for leaks. When filled with molasses, the tank leaked so badly that it was painted brown to hide the leaks. Local residents collected leaked molasses for their homes.>>
I'm sure the place must have been crawling with Ants (& uncles) after that sweet sticky mess

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by Beyond » Fri Sep 13, 2013 6:18 pm

A Macro molasses bug trap. Probably wiped out almost every insect in the area for quite a while. Although they probably all died Happy :!: :lol2:
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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by BMAONE23 » Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:28 pm

Stuck on you
Cause I'm swimming down deep in Molasses and I just can't move
Guess I'm here to stay

Found me a friend
and because I can't swim now I guess I'll be with you at the end
Can't get on my way

I'm stuck on you
stuck to the bottom of your boot I guess I'll never find my way back home
Guess I'm there to stay

So hard to see
Cause my antennae are stuck fast to my eyes and they wont pull away
Guess I'm here to stay
So I'll have to pray

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Re: I Didn't Know That

Post by Beyond » Thu Sep 19, 2013 4:13 pm

I just saw a Bald Eagle flying by my place in Connecticut I guess they must be spreading out from Massachusetts. First one I've ever seen live. Wheeeeeeee!
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