Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

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Vishal Sharma
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby Vishal Sharma » Mon May 23, 2016 5:23 pm

I know who I am

Bald Eagle
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby Bald Eagle » Fri Jul 22, 2016 2:35 pm

My interest began with a college course in Astronomy, an ongoing casual interest in NASA and its accomplishments, then Feynman's books and on-line lectures, and then wonderful Hubble. Hubble really jump-started an intense interest that has led me to follow cosmology in general and also develop an interest in quantum physics. I read everything I can get my hands on about theses subjects and have developed quite a library of related books which I sometimes reread. I can follow the arguments, understand most of what I read, am often excited by the concepts, and wish that I could do better at grasping and following the math. But alas....

rsuarez
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby rsuarez » Tue Jul 26, 2016 12:58 am

Hey Folks!,

I always be interested in space since i was a child. One of my bigger friends love disscussing 'bout astronomy and like I said before I really love too. So I start to being more informed about astronomy, the space and everything involved.

Best regards!




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Knight of Clear Skies
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby Knight of Clear Skies » Wed Jul 27, 2016 8:29 am

Had an interest as a child, I have vague memories of a small yellow astronomy book with Saturn on the cover that I was given when very young. As an adult the discovery of Sedna rekindled my interest, it really brought home how much "unknown" there is out there.

Jeff_Sullivan
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby Jeff_Sullivan » Mon Aug 08, 2016 7:55 pm

Hi, I'm Jeff Sullivan. I grew up watching the Apollo missions on TV, as well as Carl Sagan's Cosmos series. I received a 60mm telescope in 8th grade and took a photography course to learn 35mm photography and darkroom processing.

While in college at U.C. Berkeley I photographed the first space shuttle landing STS-1 on April 14, 1981 at Edwards AFB. I joined an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) student club. We won a design contest with a combustion experiment that could be conducted on the space shuttle in a self-contained Get Away Special (GAS) canister. Our team graduated before the experiment could be built, but our faculty adviser Professor Fernadez-Pello flew related experiments on STS–69 and STS–77. We obtained passes to watch the STS-4 space shuttle landing from the VIP/press tent (https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffreysu ... 958820364/). Ronald Reagan gave a speech standing on the wing of a space shuttle while another flew overhead atop a 747.
ImageSpace Shuttle Columbia Mission STS-4, April 1982 by Jeff Sullivan, on Flickr

Upon graduating from college I worked at Tektronix as an Applications Engineer in their Graphic Printing and Imaging Division as the industry transitioned from storage tube displays to color raster graphics and UNIX workstations, and color inkjet and thermal transfer printers revolutionized printing. Eventually I moved from marketing into sales, and one of my customers was NASA Ames Research Center, including groups like the SETI project.

In the past decade I've continued my interest in astronomy and space through astrophotography, pursuing images of meteor showers, solar and lunar eclipses, comets, meteor showers, moon rises and sets, conjunctions, and Asteroid (357439) 2004 BL86 using a Canon DSLR and lenses.

In recent years I have attended NASAsocial events at Vandenberg AFB for the OCO-2 satellite launch, and at Kennedy Space Center for the Orion EFT-1 launch. Recently I was fortunate to capture the Chinese CZ-7 rocket stage 2 when it reentered the earth's atmosphere on June 27, 2016.

In addition to still image astrophotography I also have been actively recording astronomy and space time-lapse videos, many of which have been uploaded to my YouTube and Vimeo accounts.

In recent years I have been leading night photography and astrophotography workshops in Yosemite, Death Valley, the Eastern Sierra, and the Wild West "ghost town" of Bodie, California.

I upload new images more or less daily to the usual photo sharing and social media sites, as well as to my Web site JeffSullivanPhotography. Samples of my work may also be seen in the following articles and publishing credits.

Re-Entering Chinese Rocket Booster Lights Up Western United States Skies
http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2016/07/29/video_of_a_chinese_rocket_re_entering_over_western_us.html

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014, Judges' Advice
https://youtu.be/SEFplF9eMgE?list=PLlLN6Bdq3jrmJYrFKnAgB5aJD6ifDNn_6

Moon Rise over an Arsenic Lake | Bad Astronomy blog | Slate Magazine
http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2013/02/25/the_belt_of_venus_moon_rise_into_the_earth_s_shadow.html

While the Sun Was Sleeping | Bad Astronomy blog | Discover Magazine
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2012/10/18/while-the-sun-was-sleeping/

Lunar Eclipse Time Lapse | Bad Astronomy blog | Discover Magazine
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/12/12/lunar-eclipse-time-lapse/

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2011 (People and Space category):
http://www.nmm.ac.uk/visit/exhibitions/astronomy-photographer-of-the-year/winners-2011/special-prizes/

Outdoor Photographer Magazine star trails cover, October 2011:
http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/images/stories/2011/oct/solutions/1-lg.jpg

The Perseids, Writ Large | Bad Astronomy blog | Discover Magazine
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2009/08/25/perseids-writ-large/

DEPUBLICAN76
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby DEPUBLICAN76 » Sun Aug 28, 2016 1:58 pm

I watched THE U. S. NASA APOLLO's (11) LANDING ON THE MOON and HOLLYWOOD's 10 COMMANDMENTS AT THE DRIVE IN THEATRE in the 1960's.

For asking the question:
ThankYou Very Much. CiAO!

witchcat

I have always been curious about everything.

Postby witchcat » Fri Dec 23, 2016 12:41 am

It is not possible that the gegenschein is not a focus of light frequencies from the sun as they deferentially refract passing around the earth due to gravity?

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Chris Peterson
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Re: I have always been curious about everything.

Postby Chris Peterson » Fri Dec 23, 2016 12:51 am

witchcat wrote:It is not possible that the gegenschein is not a focus of light frequencies from the sun as they deferentially refract passing around the earth due to gravity?

The gravitational effect of the Earth on light is incredibly small. The gegenschein is completely understood as the product of simple backscatter.
Chris

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patrickelliott
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby patrickelliott » Fri Mar 17, 2017 7:00 pm

Hi and good morning from Northern California! I guess this is as good a place as any to introduce myself - my Dad got me a telescope as a kid and I used to take it out in the front yard and look at the moon and stars (back in Central Virginia - a lot less light pollution!). Around 1997 or so, when I was in high school, I discovered APOD and have followed it since. No good reason why it's taken me so long to join the discussion board, but, 20 years later here I am. I spent a lot of time on Wikipedia in college thinking about the universe, and life. After school I found that professional philosophy wouldn't pay the bills, so I went the software route. Spent almost 10 years in Seattle and last year moved to Silicon Valley.

Dr. Nemiroff's free Intro Astronomy and Physics courses (I think that's been almost 10 years ago?) were probably some of the most informative lectures I've watched, and I actually recently started re-watching them on YouTube (which led me here, finally)

A goal of mine this year is to visit Alaska at the right time (I've been twice, at the wrong times) to see the aurora, and take a half way decent picture of it. Any recommendations for that are very much welcome!

Patrick

billbruehl
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby billbruehl » Sun May 07, 2017 5:30 pm

I''m Bill Bruehl in South Carolina and a fan of APOD since your first days long ago. I submitted a couple questions years ago, haven't lately but watch for your images and explanations everyday. It has been an education in the cosmos. And thank you.

Today's image of Star formation & the tadpoles motivated a long held question; to wit, you often give the width of a galaxy or other formation, but I don't recall that we've ever been told the "depth". For instance what is the "depth" of today's image down from the dark edges of the circle deep into the dark red center? it is clearly 3D. I just wonder how many light years it would take to get to the deep center from the dark edge.

I often find myself asking that question. Images are flat, it is easy for naïve people like me to think galaxies are flat; I'm sure they are not.
Bill

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Chris Peterson
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby Chris Peterson » Sun May 07, 2017 6:29 pm

billbruehl wrote:Today's image of Star formation & the tadpoles motivated a long held question; to wit, you often give the width of a galaxy or other formation, but I don't recall that we've ever been told the "depth". For instance what is the "depth" of today's image down from the dark edges of the circle deep into the dark red center? it is clearly 3D. I just wonder how many light years it would take to get to the deep center from the dark edge.

In most cases we don't have accurate measures of how deep things are. Broadly, nebulas like this one can be thought of as spherical- that is, they usually have similar dimensions in all three axes. Of course, in many cases they may be stretched or distorted, but still, it's not bad to think of them as a "blob".

Galaxies are a different matter. They tend to be flattened (although some are nearly spherical). But the most picturesque galaxies, the ones that tend to show up in APOD, are spiral galaxies, and those are very flat. They are something like a dinner plate that has a blob in the center. When we see them straight on, they are round; when we see them at different angles they appear oval or even linear- the latter being an edge-on view that also lets us see the thickness of the central bulge.

While you are correct that all these images have depth, it is usually hidden by the 2D nature of the images, and when things appear 3D it is often an illusion. Not that they aren't 3D, of course, but things that appear to have depth may not, or they may extend in the opposite direction that our brain tries to convince us of.
Chris

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jcrans1271

Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby jcrans1271 » Sun May 14, 2017 11:44 pm

My name is Jim C
I have been interested astronomy and the Cosmos since childhood and I recently turned 79.
I noticed on the photo of Ganymede, on the APOD for May 14,2017, surface feature relationships reminding me of similar earth surface features such as the coastline between East Africa and Madagascar and Eastern South America and West Africa which are attributed to continental shift. The relationship between the dark and light area's on Ganymede look as thought may have accreted mass on the far (not visible) side causing a spreading of existing surface features. Is this possible?

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geckzilla
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby geckzilla » Mon May 15, 2017 12:01 am

jcrans1271 wrote:My name is Jim C
I have been interested astronomy and the Cosmos since childhood and I recently turned 79.
I noticed on the photo of Ganymede, on the APOD for May 14,2017, surface feature relationships reminding me of similar earth surface features such as the coastline between East Africa and Madagascar and Eastern South America and West Africa which are attributed to continental shift. The relationship between the dark and light area's on Ganymede look as thought may have accreted mass on the far (not visible) side causing a spreading of existing surface features. Is this possible?

Greetings, Jim.

You might try asking in this thread, which is the discussion thread for the Ganymede APOD. Follow the link:
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=37180

Normally I could move your post over and send you a private message, but I am unable to send private messages to guest accounts. Up to you if you would like to re-post.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby warmingwarmingwarming » Tue May 16, 2017 10:50 pm

Maybe it was Jules Verne's 'From the Earth to the Moon' or the question 'If there was a Big Bang what exploded?' but my pals in Elementary School gave me the nickname 'Sputnick' for my interest in cosmology. I was also interested in fast airplanes and rockets. I sure wanted to be on another planet when the atomic war broke out.
I think I think, though I'm not sure if I all the thoughts I think I think, or if they come to me from .. goodness knows where. :)

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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby neufer » Wed May 17, 2017 12:24 am

warmingwarmingwarming wrote:
Maybe it was Jules Verne's 'From the Earth to the Moon' or the question 'If there was a Big Bang what exploded?' but my pals in Elementary School gave me the nickname 'Sputnick' for my interest in cosmology. I was also interested in fast airplanes and rockets. I sure wanted to be on another planet when the atomic war broke out.

So you were in Elementary School in 1957 (; i.e.,about my age).
Art Neuendorffer

warmingwarmingwarming
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Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby warmingwarmingwarming » Wed May 17, 2017 11:06 pm

neufer wrote:
warmingwarmingwarming wrote:
Maybe it was Jules Verne's 'From the Earth to the Moon' or the question 'If there was a Big Bang what exploded?' but my pals in Elementary School gave me the nickname 'Sputnick' for my interest in cosmology. I was also interested in fast airplanes and rockets. I sure wanted to be on another planet when the atomic war broke out.

So you were in Elementary School in 1957 (; i.e.,about my age).


Yes, I was 10 in '57. I thought we were about the same age. I really enjoy your posts, Neufer. How did you gain your interest in cosmology?
I think I think, though I'm not sure if I all the thoughts I think I think, or if they come to me from .. goodness knows where. :)

Veronica Starlover!

Re: Introductions: How did you become interested in astronomy?

Postby Veronica Starlover! » Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:39 am

I am Veronica I'm 32 with five children and I've always had a love of the stars and planets and anything to do with astronomy! I don't know what it is there's just something about it that fascinates me Beyond anything I can imagine!!


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