Found images: 2017 June

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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 June

Postby starsurfer » Mon Jun 19, 2017 8:48 am

Menzel 1
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/214
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Johannes Schedler

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bystander
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HEIC: Surveying the Cosmos (ESO 486-21)

Postby bystander » Mon Jun 19, 2017 12:54 pm

Surveying the Cosmos
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2017 Jun 19

The object in the middle of this image, sitting alone within a star-studded cosmos, is a galaxy known as ESO 486-21. ESO 486-21 is a spiral galaxy — albeit with a somewhat irregular and ill-defined structure — located some 30 million light-years from Earth.

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observed this object while performing a survey — the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) — of 50 nearby star-forming galaxies. The LEGUS sample was selected to cover a diverse range of galactic morphologies, star formation rates, galaxy masses, and more. Astronomers use such data to understand how stars form and evolve within clusters, and how these processes affect both their home galaxy and the wider Universe. ESO 486-21 is an ideal candidate for inclusion in such a survey as it is known to be in the process of forming new stars, which are created when large clouds of gas and dust (seen here in pink) within the galaxy crumple inwards upon themselves.

LEGUS made use of Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The WFC3 obtained detailed observations of the target objects while the ACS obtained what are known as parallel fields — instead of leaving ACS idle, it was instead trained on a small patch of sky just offset from the target field itself, allowing it to gather additional valuable information while the primary target was being observed by WFC3. Parallel fields played an important role in Hubble’s Frontier Fields programme, which used the magnifying power of large galaxy clusters (via a phenomenon known as gravitational lensing) to explore objects in the distant Universe.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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bystander
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ESO: Not the Mother of Meteorites (6 Hebe)

Postby bystander » Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:32 pm

Not the Mother of Meteorites
ESO Picture of the Week | 2017 Jun 19

The region between Mars and Jupiter is teeming with rocky worlds called asteroids. This asteroid belt is estimated to contain millions of small rocky bodies, and between 1.1 and 1.9 million larger ones spanning over one kilometre across. Small fragments of these bodies often fall to Earth as meteorites. Interestingly, 34% of all meteorites found on Earth are of one particular type: H-chondrites. These are thought to have originated from a common parent body — and one potential suspect is the asteroid 6 Hebe, shown here.

Approximately 186 kilometres in diameter and named for the Greek goddess of youth, 6 Hebe was the sixth asteroid ever to be discovered. These images were taken during a study of the mini-world using the SPHERE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope, which aimed to test the idea that 6 Hebe is the source of H-chondrites.

Astronomers modelled the spin and 3D shape of 6 Hebe as reconstructed from the observations, and used their 3D model to determine the volume of the largest depression on 6 Hebe — likely an impact crater from a collision that could have created numerous daughter meteorites. However, the volume of the depression is five times smaller than the total volume of nearby asteroid families with H-chondrite composition, which suggests that 6 Hebe is not the most likely source of H-chondrites after all.

3D shape of asteroid (6) Hebe from VLT/SPHERE imaging:
Implications for the origin of ordinary H chondrites
- M. Marsset et al
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 June

Postby starsurfer » Tue Jun 20, 2017 5:49 am

Berkeley 54
http://www.astrophoton.com/berkeley054.htm
Copyright: Bernhard Hubl
berkeley54.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 June

Postby starsurfer » Thu Jun 22, 2017 7:37 am

LBN 1022
http://www.karelteuwen.be/photo_page.php?img=438&album=15
Copyright: Karel Teuwen
LBN1022.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 June

Postby starsurfer » Thu Jun 22, 2017 7:38 am


starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 June

Postby starsurfer » Fri Jun 23, 2017 10:13 am

N70
http://www.astrobin.com/240670/0/
Copyright: Ray Johnson
39a87bbbf9e73a14ff922350f266fba3.1824x0.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 June

Postby starsurfer » Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:46 am

Terzan 1
http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1550a/
Copyright: NASA and ESA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
potw1550a.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 June

Postby starsurfer » Sun Jun 25, 2017 10:14 am

NGC 7331
http://astro-koop.de/?attachment_id=1809
Copyright: Stefan Heutz, Wolfgang Ries and Michael Breite


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