Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
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owlice
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Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by owlice » Tue Aug 24, 2010 10:17 am

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Please click on each image for best viewing; please click on the link below the
image title for more information about the image. Thank you!
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<- Previous submissions


Sagittarius Milky Way Road Map
http://www.castillosdesoria.com/astropi ... d_prod=246
Copyright: Jaime Fernandez
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Mountaintop Night Sky
Copyright: Hrvoje Jukica
[attachment=8]Jukica_apod.jpg[/attachment][/i]

Cepheus Mosaic
http://downthewormhole.blogspot.com/
Copyright: JOhn A Davis
[attachment=7]Cepheus_Mosaic_Crop_ScreenRes.jpg[/attachment][/i]

Venus, Mars, and Saturn Visit the Matterhorn
http://www.saphirtech.com/astro/gornerg ... urne-3.jpg
Credit: John Gallet
[attachment=6]cervin-venus-mars-saturne-3.jpg[/attachment][/i]

Jupiter and... Comet Tempel-10P?
Copyright: Dave Prosper
[attachment=5]comet-jupiter.jpg[/attachment][/i]

M27: Planetary Nebula in Vulpecula
http://www.massimotosco.it/M27.htm
Copyright: Massimo Tosco
[attachment=4]M27_tosco.jpg[/attachment][/i]

NGC 6946: The Fireworks Galaxy
http://www.feraphotography.com/AM14/Ngc6946.html
Copyright: Bob Fera Perseids!
http://www.leguideduciel.net/lgdc/lgdctextes/lgdc44.php
Copyright: Guillaume Cannat M27: The Dumbbell Nebula with Extended Nebulosity
http://www.telescopes.cc/m27large.htm
Copyright: Matthew T. Russell
[attachment=3]m27_70_russell.jpg[/attachment][/i]

Tropic Sky
Copyright: Tunç Tezel
[attachment=2]MangaiaRPoPan.jpg[/attachment][/i]

NGC 6888
Copyright: Wlad Onoprienko & Ivan Mhitarov
[attachment=1]NGC6888.jpg[/attachment][/i]

Conjunction of the Moon, Venus, Mars and Saturn over Segovia
http://www.fotonauta.net
Copyright: Mario Ximenez
[attachment=0]conjuncion-13-agosto-2010.jpg[/attachment][/i]


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terrastro
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by terrastro » Wed Aug 25, 2010 1:42 pm

The tropic sky is just sublime. I wonder where does that lighter band on the water come from?

Alex

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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by Beyond » Wed Aug 25, 2010 6:33 pm

WOW! that second perseid picture is somthing!! Not only to see it in motion, but that it also left a smokey trail.(that looks just like the dust we see in space)Down here on the ROCK, when copper oxide is burned in a fireplace log, it gives off green flames. So i would expect that that particular meteorite was mostly copper. But knowing that a lot of things are different in space, i would almost expect that i am completely wrong.
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by squirreltape » Wed Aug 25, 2010 7:53 pm

My guess on the lighter band in the water would be bioluminescence. When I visited Tobago we regularly saw faint glows coming from the low swells about as far of shore as in the picture. They were parallel to the shore line and kept behind the small waves half as near to the sand. In the timelapse above I would imagine that would be plenty of time to record it.

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Ann
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by Ann » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:14 am

squirreltape wrote:My guess on the lighter band in the water would be bioluminescence. When I visited Tobago we regularly saw faint glows coming from the low swells about as far of shore as in the picture. They were parallel to the shore line and kept behind the small waves half as near to the sand. In the timelapse above I would imagine that would be plenty of time to record it.
That's quite possible. When I was a kid and used to swim in the fairly cold waters of the Skagerak off the west coast of Sweden, the water nevertheless got warm enough in August for a wealth of little flourescent green things to make their presence known - and seen.

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owlice
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by owlice » Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:01 am

NGC 7023: The Iris Nebula in Cepheus
http://www.feraphotography.com/AM14/Ngc7023.html
Copyright: Bob and Janice Fera Eta Carinae and the Homunculus Nebula in 3D
Get out your red-blue glasses for this one!
http://www.universein3d.com/Home/Entrie ... rnova.html
Credit: Image, Hubble Space Telescope (NASA); 3D Rendering, Matt Yacavone NGC 7293: The Helix Nebula in Aquarius
Copyright: Paulo Lobao
[attachment=0]RGB-v2-h copy.jpg[/attachment][/i]

Apogee and Perigee Moons
http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Lunar-Scene ... e-2010.htm
Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by Beyond » Thu Aug 26, 2010 11:39 am

Owlice wrote "Apogee and Perigee."
No wonder it seems to be brighter in the winter. Not only is there snow on the ground to reflect the moonlight, but the moon is also closer and gives us more reflected sunlight.
Thanks for mooning us twice - owlice. :shock:
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by bystander » Thu Aug 26, 2010 11:52 am

beyond wrote:No wonder it seems to be brighter in the winter. Not only is there snow on the ground to reflect the moonlight, but the moon is also closer and gives us more reflected sunlight.
Lunar apogee and perigee do not occur the same time every year. In a previous APOD, the relative times were reversed.

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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by owlice » Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:22 pm

beyond, I usually restrict my mooning to this thread, but every once and a while, I just have to break out of the box!
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by Ayiomamitis » Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:44 pm

beyond wrote:Owlice wrote "Apogee and Perigee."
No wonder it seems to be brighter in the winter. Not only is there snow on the ground to reflect the moonlight, but the moon is also closer and gives us more reflected sunlight.
Thanks for mooning us twice - owlice. :shock:
Actually I believe the true underlying reason lies somewhere else.

More specifically, the sun and moon play a little game between summer and winter. During summer, the sun is way overhead whereas the moon is relatively much lower. Fast forward six months and during winter you have precisely the opposite situation where the moon is way overhead (and bright! :wink: ) whereas the sun is now much lower.

It is for this reason the apogee-perigee comparisons include the altitude of the moon. I shoot these moons when they are crossing the meridian and, as such, when they are highest in the sky (relatively speaking). Taking a peek at the altitude of the (perigee) moon during winter and comparing that with the (apogee) moon during summer yields a dramatic difference and which I believe explains your observation above that the it seems brighter (it actually is) during the winter.

In a similar fashion, if we look at the analemmas - http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Solar-Analemma.htm - we will see again how the sun is high during the summer (upper loop) and relatively much lower during the winter (lower loop).

Sorry for the lengthy reply.

Anthony.
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by Ayiomamitis » Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:47 pm

bystander wrote:Lunar apogee and perigee do not occur the same time every year. In a previous APOD, the relative times were reversed.
This is correct. One cannot generalize between summer and winter when discussing apogee and perigee.

Anthony.
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by bystander » Thu Aug 26, 2010 1:10 pm


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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by Beyond » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:59 pm

After perusing these posts, i see that at least i got the double mooning right--Apogee & Perigee. At least that's an improvement. :roll:
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by Ann » Fri Aug 27, 2010 4:25 am

The Moon stuff was definitely interesting.

I think my favorite image, however, may be the Cepheus mosaic. Cepheus doesn't get as much attention as it deserves, given that it is a richly starforming constellation with a lot of dust, nebulae and clusters. I don't recall seeing more than one other wide-field Cepheus image showing off a lot of nebulae, and I think that even that image didn't show as many different objects as this one. This picture is beautiful and dramatic, and it sure brings home the fact that Cepheus is a very dusty place! The royal cleaners have gone on strike!

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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by owlice » Fri Aug 27, 2010 11:39 am

The Moon and Jupiter
Copyright: Mojtaba Moghadasi
[attachment=0]IMG_4977.jpg[/attachment][/i]
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by owlice » Fri Aug 27, 2010 12:37 pm

Night and day time-lapses from Colle dell'Agnello
http://comolli.zapto.org/v001.htm
Copyright: Lorenzo Comolli
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by owlice » Fri Aug 27, 2010 1:17 pm

Omega Centauri
http://www.earthandskyphoto.com/
Copyright: Jeff Ball
[attachment=0]omega_jeff_ball_aug_2010.jpg[/attachment][/i]
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Re: Recent Submissions: 2010 August 25-27

Post by Ayiomamitis » Sat Aug 28, 2010 12:21 pm

bystander wrote:Congratulations, Anthony. You made Bad Astronomy: Does this perigee make my Moon look fat?
Thanks! Phil has always been receptive to my work and the above is no exception.

Anthony.
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