HEIC: NGC 6210: An Odd Planetary Nebula in Hercules

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bystander
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HEIC: NGC 6210: An Odd Planetary Nebula in Hercules

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 18, 2010 4:01 pm

NGC 6210: An Odd Planetary Nebula in Hercules
Hubble European Picture of the Week | potw1026a | 18 Oct 2010
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has taken a striking high resolution image of the curious planetary nebula NGC 6210. Located about 6500 light-years away, in the constellation of Hercules, NGC 6210 was discovered in 1825 by the German astronomer Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struve. Although in a small telescope it appears only as a tiny disc, it is fairly bright.

NGC 6210 is the last gasp of a star slightly less massive than our Sun at the final stage of its life cycle. The multiple shells of material ejected by the dying star form a superposition of structures with different degrees of symmetry, giving NGC 6210 its odd shape. This sharp image shows the inner region of this planetary nebula in unprecedented detail, where the central star is surrounded by a thin, bluish bubble that reveals a delicate filamentary structure. This bubble is superposed onto an asymmetric, reddish gas formation where holes, filaments and pillars are clearly visible.

The life of a star ends when the fuel available to its thermonuclear engine runs out. The estimated lifetime for a Sun-like star is some ten billion years. When the star is about to expire, it becomes unstable and ejects its outer layers, forming a planetary nebula and leaving behind a tiny, but very hot, remnant, known as white dwarf. This compact object, here visible at the centre of the image, cools down and fades very slowly. Stellar evolution theory predicts that our Sun will experience the same fate as NGC 6210 in about five billion years.

This picture was created from images taken with Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 through three filters: the broadband filter F555W (yellow) and the narrowband filters F656N (ionised hydrogen), F658N (ionised nitrogen) and F502N (ionised oxygen). The exposure times were 80 s, 140 s, 800 s and 700 s respectively and the field of view is only about 28 arcseconds across.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

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An Odd Number of filters

Post by neufer » Mon Oct 18, 2010 4:19 pm

bystander wrote:NGC 6210 An Odd Planetary Nebula in Hercules
Hubble European Picture of the Week | potw1026a | 18 Oct 2010

This picture was created from images taken with Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 through three filters:
the broadband filter F555W (yellow) and the narrowband filters F656N (ionised hydrogen), F658N (ionised nitrogen) and F502N (ionised oxygen).
The exposure times were 80 s, 140 s, 800 s and 700 s respectively and the field of view is only about 28 arcseconds across.
Three filters?
Last edited by neufer on Mon Oct 18, 2010 5:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Art Neuendorffer

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neufer
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the "Turtle Nebula"

Post by neufer » Mon Oct 18, 2010 4:58 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
"Turtle Nebulous" made from MST 3K observations
[img3="These are images of the planetary nebula NGC 6210
(dubbed the "Turtle Nebula") that we made from our HST WFPC2 observations in Cycle 6. The image on the right side is an enlargement of the center region of the nebula shown on the left-side frame. The color coding was changed to enhance the features of the area of interest."]http://www-space.arc.nasa.gov/~rubin/OL ... c6210p.jpg[/img3]
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Ann
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Re: An Odd Number of filters

Post by Ann » Mon Oct 18, 2010 5:43 pm

neufer wrote:
bystander wrote:NGC 6210 An Odd Planetary Nebula in Hercules
Hubble European Picture of the Week | potw1026a | 18 Oct 2010

This picture was created from images taken with Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 through three filters:
the broadband filter F555W (yellow) and the narrowband filters F656N (ionised hydrogen), F658N (ionised nitrogen) and F502N (ionised oxygen).
The exposure times were 80 s, 140 s, 800 s and 700 s respectively and the field of view is only about 28 arcseconds across.
Three filters?
Yeah, well. One, two, hmmm, three.

Image

One, two, ummm, three. You know, I think this is in Japanese.

As for the Hubble picture taken through one, two, ummm, three filters, it looks nice enough for me who loves the color blue. On the other hand, I'm not too fond of the idea that non-blue objects would be shown as blue.

The oxygen emission recorded through the ummmth filter is suffciently close to blue light that it might be approximated as blue. What about the image taken through the F555 filter, though? Was that also colored blue?

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neufer
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"That's a fine-looking Farkel flinger you found there, Frank

Post by neufer » Mon Oct 18, 2010 6:08 pm

Ann wrote:
What about the image taken through the F555 filter, though?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Farkel_Family wrote:
[img3="The Farkel Family & "good friend and trusted neighbor" Ferd Berffle"]http://c3.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/imag ... f248ae.jpg[/img3]
<<The Farkel Family was a recurring sketch on the television variety show Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In. The Farkel parents, Frank Farkel (played by Dan Rowan) and Fanny Farkel (played by Jo Anne Worley), both had dark-colored hair and good eyesight. Curiously, all the children had red hair and wore glasses, just like their "good friend and trusted neighbor" Ferd Berffle, played by Dick Martin.

The youngest was Sparkle Farkel, played by Goldie Hawn. There were also the twins, Simon and Gar Farkel. Despite being identical twins, they were played by actresses of different races, Pamela Rodgers and Teresa Graves. There were also sketches wherein the identical twins, Sparkle and Charcoal Farkel were played by Goldie Hawn and Teresa Graves. Other Farkel children during the sketch's run included Mark Farkel, and Fritz and Fred Farkel.

Much of the humor in the Farkel sketches derived from repeatedly introducing every member of the large family by name. Otherwise the dialogue would lead to tongue-twisters ("That's a fine-looking Farkel flinger you found there, Frank"). One daughter, Flicker Farkel (played by Ruth Buzzi), always had a single word of dialogue: "Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!">>
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