Poll: Astronomy Picture of the Week for 2011 Sept 25-Oct 1

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.

Please vote for the TWO best APODs (image and text) of September 25-October 1

Poll ended at Thu Oct 06, 2011 6:15 pm

Dry Ice Pits on Mars
160
22%
Flying Over Planet Earth
241
33%
Violent Sunspot Group AR 1302 Unleashes a Flare
115
16%
Cocoon Nebula Wide Field
75
10%
Cloudy Night of the Northern Lights
115
16%
Asteroids Near Earth
34
5%
 
Total votes: 740

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owlice
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Poll: Astronomy Picture of the Week for 2011 Sept 25-Oct 1

Post by owlice » Sun Oct 02, 2011 6:15 pm

_______________________________________________________________

Please vote for the TWO best Astronomy Pictures of the Day (image and text) of September 25-October 1, 2011.
(Repeated APODs are not included in the poll.)

All titles are clickable and link to the original APOD page.

We ask for your help in choosing an APOW as this helps Jerry and Robert create "year in APOD images" review lectures, create APOM and APOY polls that can be used to create a free PDF calendar at year's end, and provides feedback on which images and APODs were relatively well received. You can select two top images for the week.

We are very interested in why you selected the APODs you voted for, and enthusiastically welcome your telling us why by responding to this thread.

Thank you!
_______________________________________________________________

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Part of Mars is defrosting. Around the South Pole of Mars, toward the end of every Martian summer, the warm weather causes a section of the vast carbon-dioxide ice cap to evaporate. Pits begin to appear and expand where the carbon dioxide dry ice sublimates directly into gas. These ice sheet pits may appear to be lined with gold, but the precise composition of the dust that highlights the pit walls actually remains unknown. The circular depressions toward the image center measure about 60 meters across. The HiRISE camera aboard the Mars-orbiting Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured the above image in late July. In the next few months, as Mars continues its journey around the Sun, colder seasons will prevail, and the thin air will turn chilly enough not only to stop the defrosting but once again freeze out more layers of solid carbon dioxide.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Image Credit: NASA; Acknowledgement: Infinity Imagined
Have you ever dreamed of flying high above the Earth? Astronauts visiting the International Space Station do this every day, circling our restless planet twice every three hours. A dramatic example of their view was compiled in the above time-lapse video from images taken earlier this month. As the ISS speeds into the nighttime half of the globe, familiar constellations of stars remain visible above. An aerosol haze of Earth's thin atmosphere is visible on the horizon as an thin multi-colored ring. Many wonders whiz by below, including vast banks of white clouds, large stretches of deep blue sea, land lit up by the lights of big cities and small towns, and storm clouds flashing with lightning. The video starts over the northern Pacific Ocean and then passes from western North America to western South America, ending near Antarctica as daylight finally approaches.
One of the most active sunspot groups in years is currently crossing the Sun. AR 1302 first came around the Sun's edge last week and is so large it can be seen without a telescope. Coronal Mass Ejections from AR 1302 have already caused strong geomagnetic storms including notable aurora activity around both of Earth's poles. Pictured above, plasma was left magnetically hanging above the Sun's surface after AR 1302 emitted an X-class solar flare last Thursday. Earth is illustrated in the inset for a size comparison. Although another X-class flare was emitted on Saturday, no flares from AR 1302 have been aimed directly at the Earth, as yet. The AR 1302 sunspot group will continue to evolve but likely remain visible on the Sun for the next week.
In this crowded starfield spanning some 3 degrees within the high flying constellation Cygnus, the eye is drawn to the Cocoon Nebula. A compact star forming region, the cosmic Cocoon punctuates a long trail of obscuring interstellar dust clouds. Cataloged as IC 5146, the nebula is nearly 15 light-years wide, located some 4,000 light years away. Like other star forming regions, it stands out in red, glowing, hydrogen gas excited by the young, hot stars and blue, dust-reflected starlight at the edge of an otherwise invisible molecular cloud. In fact, the bright star near the center of this nebula is likely only a few hundred thousand years old, powering the nebular glow as it clears out a cavity in the molecular cloud's star forming dust and gas. But the long dusty filaments that appear dark in this visible light image are themselves hiding stars in the process of formation, seen at infrared wavelengths.
On September 26, a large solar coronal mass ejection smacked into planet Earth's magnetosphere producing a severe geomagnetic storm and wide spread auroras. Captured here near local midnight from Kvaløya island outside Tromsø in northern Norway, the intense auroral glow was framed by parting rain clouds. Tinted orange, the clouds are also in silhouette as the tops of the colorful shimmering curtains of northern lights extend well over 100 kilometers above the ground. Though the auroral rays are parallel, perspective makes them appear to radiate from a vanishing point at the zenith. Near the bottom of the scene, an even more distant Pleiades star cluster and bright planet Jupiter shine on this cloudy northern night.
Though the sizes are not to scale, the Sun and planets of the inner solar system are shown in this illustration, where each red dot represents an asteroid. New results from NEOWISE, the infrared asteroid hunting portion of the WISE mission, are shown on the left compared to old population projections of mid-size or larger near-Earth asteroids from surveys at visible wavelengths. And the good news is, NEOWISE observations estimate there are 40 percent fewer near-Earth asteroids that are larger than 100 meters (330 feet), than indicated by visible light searches. Based on infrared imaging, the NEOWISE results are more accurate as well. Heated by the Sun, asteroids of the same size radiate the same amount of infrared light, but can reflect very different amounts of visible sunlight depending on how shiny their surface is, or their surface albedo. That effect can bias surveys based on optical observations. NEOWISE results reduce the estimated number of mid-size near-Earth asteroids from about 35,000 to 19,500, but the majority still remain undiscovered.
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Anthony Barreiro
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Re: Poll: Astronomy Picture of the Week for 2011 Sept 25-Oct

Post by Anthony Barreiro » Wed Oct 05, 2011 6:21 pm

This was a difficult poll, because all the pictures are lovely and informative. I voted for the Martian dry ice pits because of the pretty colors and high resolution of the image, and for the ISS flyover video because I could almost make out my neighbor's annoying porch light.
I can't wait for next week's poll, to see how many votes the qr code gets.
May all beings be happy, peaceful, and free.

neptunium

Re: Poll: Astronomy Picture of the Week for 2011 Sept 25-Oct

Post by neptunium » Thu Oct 06, 2011 1:07 am

This was a tough poll. I would have gone with the ISS timelapse video for sure, but all the others were almost tied with each other. I finally settled with the Northern Lights picture. :)

Luis Acuña

Re: Poll: Astronomy Picture of the Week for 2011 Sept 25-Oct

Post by Luis Acuña » Thu Oct 06, 2011 1:28 am

Spanglish? No, please. No me pierdo APOD como página que visito en forma obligada y diaria, por lo demás una significativa parte de las fotografías provienen de mi país :D
Tras la decepción de ayer, escoger la ilustración de la semana me resultó más difícil que de costumbre, pero escogí el vídeo de la ISS por su colorido, la sensación de profundidad y su dificultad técnica.
Bueno, saludos desde el sur del mundo.
Google translate wrote:Spanglish? No, please. I do not miss APOD as pages you visit on a daily must and otherwise a significant portion of the photographs come from my country.

After the disappointment of yesterday, choosing the picture of the week was more difficult than usual, but I chose the video of the ISS for its color, the feeling of depth and technical difficulty.

Well, greetings from the South.
Last edited by bystander on Thu Oct 06, 2011 2:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: added google translation

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bystander
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Re: Poll: Astronomy Picture of the Week for 2011 Sept 25-Oct

Post by bystander » Thu Oct 06, 2011 2:10 am

Luis Acuña wrote:Spanglish? No, please. I do not miss APOD as pages you visit on a daily must and otherwise a significant portion of the photographs come from my country.

After the disappointment of yesterday, choosing the picture of the week was more difficult than usual, but I chose the video of the ISS for its color, the feeling of depth and technical difficulty.

Well, greetings from the South.
While it's true many observatories are in Chile, this is an English only board. Please read the rules.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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