Submissions: 2014 January

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
MaPa
Ensign
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 11:00 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by MaPa » Mon Jan 13, 2014 9:58 am

B92 chasing B93
Copyright: Marcin Paciorek http://www.astromarcin.pl

Looks like jellyfish chasing squid
Two objects from Barnard's catalog however there is also part of M24 visible here. I would never guess that Messier's list has something more than clusters, nebulas or distance galaxies...

More information about this session here: http://www.astromarcin.pl/pages/b92_93.html

mattssporre
Ensign
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:46 pm

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by mattssporre » Mon Jan 13, 2014 3:20 pm

The Southern PinWheel - M83 - NGC5236
http://www.istarion.net/index.html
Copyright: Matts Sporre

tjugo
Ensign
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:49 pm

Bicolor Rosette with RGB stars

Post by tjugo » Mon Jan 13, 2014 6:05 pm

Hi,

Since I couldn't edit my original post I will add a new entry. Sorry :)

This image was created with the same data I created the HST version, but this time I only used the Ha and OIII in the following proportion:

Ha = Red, O3 = Green, 0.8*O3 + 0.2*Ha = Blue

Then to add some icing on the cake I replaced the stars with the RGB stars I captured with very short exposures.

Image

A full review of the image (in spanish) can be found here:

http://mtanous.wordpress.com/2013/12/30 ... la-roseta/

Full details of the image (english captions) here:

http://mtanous.wordpress.com/ngc2244/

Thanks for looking!

Cheers,

Jose Mtanous

astroligu
Ensign
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 8:44 pm

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by astroligu » Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:44 pm

Rolando Ligustri wrote: comet C/2013 R1 Lovejoy, at 13/01/2014, wide field
link for high res, http://www.astrobin.com/72599/

IO_12
Science Officer
Posts: 137
Joined: Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:03 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by IO_12 » Mon Jan 13, 2014 8:36 pm

Tidal Streams in NGC 770, NGC 772 (Arp 78) - Interacting galaxies in Aries

http://www.irida-observatory.org

Copyright: [url=mailto://info@irida-observatory.org]Velimir Popov, Emil Ivanov[/url]

NGC 772 (also known as a peculiar spiral galaxy Arp 78) is an unbarred giant spiral galaxy approximately 106 million light-years away in the constellation Aries. It is notable for possessing a single elongated outer spiral arm. The asymmetric spiral arms are distorted by interaction with the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 770. NGC 770 appears to be at about the same distance as NGC 772, so it is most likely a true companion to the larger spiral system. It has a separation of only 160 000 light-years from its larger companion with an actual diameter of only about 40000 light-years.

LRGB combination - 15 hours
Annotated image
B / W image

Higher resolution and more information is available on the website ...

Thank you for looking ...

http://www.irida-observatory.org

IO_12
Science Officer
Posts: 137
Joined: Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:03 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by IO_12 » Mon Jan 13, 2014 8:48 pm

... some ideas what can be this nebulosity ?

User avatar
geckzilla
Ocular Digitator
Posts: 9101
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Location: Modesto, CA

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by geckzilla » Mon Jan 13, 2014 8:56 pm

If you got a deeper image of it you might be able to find some star stream connecting it somewhere to NGC 772... otherwise, who knows. Dwarf galaxy? Local cirrus?
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

IO_12
Science Officer
Posts: 137
Joined: Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:03 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by IO_12 » Mon Jan 13, 2014 10:33 pm

geckzilla wrote:If you got a deeper image of it you might be able to find some star stream connecting it somewhere to NGC 772... otherwise, who knows. Dwarf galaxy? Local cirrus?
Another 15 hours? May be, one day :-)

To find conections with NGC 772 will be great but I doubt of this. My first assumption was a cirrus also but you are right, who knows.

Meteocaravaca
Asternaut
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:36 pm

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by Meteocaravaca » Mon Jan 13, 2014 11:51 pm

Rho Ophiuchi

TSQ65APO + Canon 5D Mark II.

Copyright: Álvaro Pérez Alonso y Jose Manuel Pérez Alonso. Pérez Alonso Photography.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/perezalonsofotografia

http://www.meteocaravaca.es

Image

High resolution: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5529/1122 ... 76ff_o.jpg

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 10698
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by Ann » Tue Jan 14, 2014 1:34 am

IO_12 wrote:... some ideas what can be this nebulosity ?
A (somewhat remote) possibility is that it is a "galactic cirrus" wisp that is associated with the Milky Way rather than with NGC 772. Admittedly this wisp is far from the galactic plane.

Another possibility is that it is associated with NGC 772. If so, it doesn't look much like a dwarf galaxy, because I don't think it has the right shape for it. I note that it appears to be ever so slightly bluer in color and grainier in "texture" than the outer arms of NGC 772.

To me it looks like a wisp of gas, perhaps with a few stars inside it. It has the striated appearance of the reflection nebulosity around the Pleiades, as if it was aligned along magnetic lines.

It is possible that it is a dwarf companion of NGC 772. Look at this image of NGC 4449 and dwarf companion by R Jay GaBany. Could your "wisp of nebulosity" be something similar to this tiny elongated mini-galaxy? Possibly, but let's bear in mind that NGC 4449 is an intrinsically small galaxy, much smaller than the Milky Way, whereas NGC 772 is a large galaxy, considerably larger than the Milky Way. If the wisp of apparent nebulosity that you have photographed is associated with NGC 772, then it must be relatively big, and much, much bigger than the tiny galaxy associated with NGC 4449.

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
geckzilla
Ocular Digitator
Posts: 9101
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Location: Modesto, CA

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by geckzilla » Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:13 am

I guess I make invisible posts. Anyway, it's not a good thing to go so far speculating about magnetic fields just because you see some lines.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

kevin-palmer
Asternaut
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:32 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by kevin-palmer » Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:47 am

Website: http://www.kevin-palmer.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KevinPalmerPhotography1
Copyright: Kevin Palmer

Thousands of stars forming the milky way galaxy are seen above a deep canyon in Utah. The Colorado River flows 2000 feet below the rim of Dead Horse Point into Canyonlands National Park. The bright light on the horizon is the planet Venus. There is no other object in the night sky brighter than Venus except for the moon, which had set only minutes earlier. The clear weather, dry air, and dark skies make this area one of the best in the country for stargazing.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7363/1182 ... 581b_o.jpg
mw.jpg
On Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevin-palmer/11828347365
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by owlice on Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Attached smaller image for faster downloading; left link to larger image. Thanks for sharing!

kevin-palmer
Asternaut
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:32 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by kevin-palmer » Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:49 am

Website: http://www.kevin-palmer.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KevinPalmerPhotography1
Copyright: Kevin Palmer

The two brightest objects in the night sky appear side by side in front of the milky way in a rare alignment. Venus is the blue object, and the yellow object is the moon. Even though the moon was only an 8% crescent, it was brighter than Venus. The band of yellow along the horizon is from the last colors of twilight before it became completely dark. This incredible sky is framed over the Colorado River in Utah. The 2000 foot deep canyon is part of Canyonlands National Park. But this view was actually shot from the edge of a cliff at Dead Horse Point State Park.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3768/1182 ... 702c_o.jpg
horseshoe.jpg
On Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevin-palmer/11828347745
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by owlice on Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Attached smaller image for faster downloading; left link to larger image. Please keep hotlinked images under 400K. Thanks for sharing!

IO_12
Science Officer
Posts: 137
Joined: Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:03 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by IO_12 » Tue Jan 14, 2014 7:27 am

geckzilla wrote:I guess I make invisible posts. Anyway, it's not a good thing to go so far speculating about magnetic fields just because you see some lines.
Thank you GECKZILA, thank you ANN :-)

Obviously further investigations are needed but now the good visibility (down to 40 degrees altitude) of these objects is in a very short time window: 17:00 to 20:00 UTC. Probably a few more L frames in the next new moon period ...

NBuer
Asternaut
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:23 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by NBuer » Tue Jan 14, 2014 1:15 pm

*From the Northern to the Southern Cross*

This is a 30 image panorama taken from Laguna Cejar in Northern Chile. It is probably one of my most favourite astrophotos I have taken thus far mainly because it harbours many celestial delights.

Firstly we have our own galaxy, the Milky Way stretching all the way from Crux to Cygnus. In the middle of the photograph there is the Moon, the large bright object above the moon in Venus and below the moon if you look carefully there are two other 'stars', Saturn on the right and Mercury on the left.

On the far left we have the large and small Magellanic clouds, our closest galactic neighbours and finally the red hue on the left is airglow, which is an emission from excited OH radicals ~86km high.

Image

http://www.nicholasbuer.com/wp-content/ ... s-Buer.jpg


http://www.facebook.com/NicholasBuerPhotography
http://www.nicholasbuer.com

thenews24

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by thenews24 » Tue Jan 14, 2014 6:09 pm

philto wrote:Hi to all and happy new year 2014 !
Pleiades occultation by moon July 18th 2009.
80 mm F/7 refractor + eos 350 D
4 images processed & fused by photomatix pro.
regards.

image © Philippe TOSI
Wow, how did you smoothly combine those exposures? Awesome work

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4107
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by starsurfer » Tue Jan 14, 2014 6:57 pm

IO_12 wrote:... some ideas what can be this nebulosity ?
I think it is likely to be galactic cirrus nebulosity as there is lots of it in the direction towards Aries. Many galaxies in Aries have great clouds of galactic cirrus around them, most notably NGC 918. There are also lots of high latitude dust clouds catalogued in Aries, most notably LBN 762.

IO_12
Science Officer
Posts: 137
Joined: Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:03 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by IO_12 » Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:13 pm

starsurfer wrote:
IO_12 wrote:... some ideas what can be this nebulosity ?
I think it is likely to be galactic cirrus nebulosity as there is lots of it in the direction towards Aries. Many galaxies in Aries have great clouds of galactic cirrus around them, most notably NGC 918. There are also lots of high latitude dust clouds catalogued in Aries, most notably LBN 762.
Thank you STARSURFER, you are right. This is obviously a small patch of local cirrus. Today I also checked lots of images and this region is fully contaminated :-)

sydney
Science Officer
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:51 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by sydney » Wed Jan 15, 2014 3:57 am


sydney
Science Officer
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:51 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by sydney » Wed Jan 15, 2014 4:02 am


sydney
Science Officer
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:51 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by sydney » Wed Jan 15, 2014 4:06 am


sydney
Science Officer
Posts: 113
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:51 am

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by sydney » Wed Jan 15, 2014 4:10 am


adonoan
Asternaut
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:52 am

The first post

Post by adonoan » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:11 am

Night of Mongolia plains

I shot this photo last month in Mongolia plains.
This night was a temperature of about -35 ℃.

Copyright: Naoyuki Noda
Website: http://adonoan.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/naoyuki.noda.7

Fabrizio Francione
Ensign
Posts: 26
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2010 5:41 pm

Re: Submissions: 2014 January

Post by Fabrizio Francione » Wed Jan 15, 2014 11:10 am

Hello,

A Meteor shower ,probably a Quadrantids residue ,received using the reflection of the GRAVES radar signal situated in north of France and captured in Turin with a simple omnidirectional antenna and a PCR1500 receiver in CW . We've added a new monitoring station H24, available for everybody here : http://www.sidmonitor.net/gallery/station.html bottom page (refresh if it doesn't appear.) On the live spectrogram are clearly visible many traces of planes and the vertical lines that you see are meteors. Audio of the first image here : http://chirb.it/xfOIPB

AIR - CSP- Fabrizio Francione- Renato Romero- Claudio Re.

User avatar
nuclearcat
Ensign
Posts: 94
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 9:57 pm

Jupiter Moon Conjuction with a Lunar Halo

Post by nuclearcat » Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:17 pm

Taken from Middle East Technical university campus in Ankara on 14.01.2014
Copyright: M. Raşid Tuğral
The Moon is set,
And the Pleiades.
Night's half gone,
Time's passing.
I sleep alone now. ”

— Sappho