Found images: 2017 February

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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:35 pm

CG 1 and CG 2
http://www.tvdavisastropics.com/astroimages-1_0000b8.htm
Copyright: Thomas Davis
astroimages-1_i000136.jpg

CG 1 is the cometary globule near the centre and CG 2 is the smaller cometary globule below and to the left.
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bystander
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ESO/HEIC: ALMA’s Hole in the Universe / Astronomical Cooperation

Postby bystander » Mon Feb 20, 2017 3:37 pm

ALMA’s Hole in the Universe / Astronomical Cooperation
ESO / ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2017 Feb 20

The events surrounding the Big Bang were so cataclysmic that they left an indelible imprint on the fabric of the cosmos. We can detect these scars today by observing the oldest light in the Universe. As it was created nearly 14 billion years ago, this light — which exists now as weak microwave radiation and is thus named the cosmic microwave background (CMB) — has now expanded to permeate the entire cosmos, filling it with detectable photons.

The CMB can be used to probe the cosmos via something known as the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) effect, which was first observed over 30 years ago. We detect the CMB here on Earth when its constituent microwave photons travel to us through space. On their journey to us, they can pass through galaxy clusters that contain high-energy electrons. These electrons give the photons a tiny boost of energy. Detecting these boosted photons through our telescopes is challenging but important — they can help astronomers to understand some of the fundamental properties of the Universe, such as the location and distribution of dense galaxy clusters.

This image shows the first measurements of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile (in blue). Astronomers combined data from ALMA’s 7- and 12-metre antennas to produce the sharpest possible image. The target was one of the most massive known galaxy clusters, RX J1347.5–1145, the centre of which shows up here in the dark “hole” in the ALMA observations. The energy distribution of the CMB photons shifts and appears as a temperature decrease at the wavelength observed by ALMA, hence a dark patch is observed in this image at the location of the cluster.

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observed one of most massive known galaxy clusters, RX J1347.5–1145, seen in this Picture of the Week, as part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). This observation of the cluster, 5 billion light-years from Earth, helped the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile to study the cosmic microwave background using the thermal Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect. The observations made with ALMA are visible as the blue-purple hues.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:00 pm

NGC 2467
http://www.pbase.com/strongmanmike2002/ngc_2467
Copyright: Michael Sidonio
164806444.HHOf1Mc2.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:18 pm

IC 2087
http://www.atacama-photographic-observatory.com/page_photo.php?id=56
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
ic2087.jpg

The dark nebula is B22.
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:24 pm

Owl Nebula (M97)
http://www.cxielo.ch/gallery/v/nebulae/m97-07a-lrgb.jpg.html
Copyright: Martin Rusterholz
m97.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:28 pm

California Nebula (NGC 1499)
http://www.straightontillmorning.me/Astronomy/Nebula/Colour/i-FSZRmGn/X2
Copyright: Hytham Abu-Safieh
california.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:31 pm

Lower's Nebula (Sh2-261)
http://www.astro-auersthal.at/Sh2-261_LowersNeb.htm
Copyright: Martin Helm
Sh2-261_Lower-Nebula.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:36 pm

M13
https://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im1274.html
Copyright: T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage) and H. Schweiker (WIYN and NOAO/AURA/NSF)
m13.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:38 pm

Ring Nebula (M57)
http://www.pbase.com/skybox/image/164511382
Copyright: Kevin Quin
164511382.oy5XCk89.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:40 pm

LoTr 5
http://www.capella-observatory.com/ImageHTMLs/PNs/LoTr5.htm
Copyright: Stefan Binnewies and Josef Pöpsel
LoTr5.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby starsurfer » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:43 pm

Sh2-54 and NGC 6604
http://www.glitteringlights.com/Images/Nebulae/i-jVQ8Z3z/X3
Copyright: Marco Lorenzi
ngc6604.jpg
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Re: Found images: 2017 February

Postby canopia » Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:36 pm

Annular Solar Eclipse
https://www.facebook.com/stephen.bedingfield.7/posts/10154042761157563
Shot from the centreline near Facundo, Chubut, Argentina.
Copyright: Stephen Bedingfield
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HEIC: A Remarkable Galactic Hybrid (UGC 12591)

Postby bystander » Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:41 pm

A Remarkable Galactic Hybrid
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2017 Feb 27

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image showcases the remarkable galaxy UGC 12591. Classified as an S0/Sa galaxy, UGC 12591 sits somewhere between a lenticular and a spiral. It lies just under 400 million light-years away from us in the westernmost region of the Pisces–Perseus Supercluster, a long chain of galaxy clusters that stretches out for hundreds of light-years — one of the largest known structures in the cosmos.

The galaxy itself is also extraordinary: it is incredibly massive. The galaxy and its halo together contain several hundred billion times the mass of the Sun; four times the mass of the Milky Way. It also whirls round extremely quickly, rotating at speeds of up to 1.8 million kilometres per hour!

Observations with Hubble are helping astronomers to understand the mass of UGC 12591, and to determine whether the galaxy simply formed and grew slowly over time, or whether it might have grown unusually massive by colliding and merging with another large galaxy at some point in its past.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor


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