Found images: 2017 November

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Found images: 2017 November

Postby bystander » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:16 pm


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 400K.

Thank you!

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starsurfer
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:19 pm


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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:21 pm

Rho Ophiuchi Nebula (IC 4604)
http://www.tvdavisastropics.com/astroimages-1_0000bf.htm
Copyright: Thomas Davis
astroimages-1_i000040.jpg
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:30 pm

NGC 3586
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo67.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
photo67bf.jpg

photo67f.jpg
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:33 pm

WR 22
http://astrodonimaging.com/gallery/wr-22/
Copyright: Don Goldman
WR22.jpg
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:40 pm

Shapley 1 and VBRC 7
http://www.atacama-photographic-observatory.com/page_photo.php?id=79
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
shapley1.jpg

http://www.atacama-photographic-observatory.com/page_photo.php?id=91
shapley1_Ha.jpg

Shapley 1 is on the right and VBRC 7 is on the left.
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:42 pm

NGC 5253
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/239
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Johannes Schedler

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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:43 pm


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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby jose » Thu Nov 02, 2017 7:53 pm

[img2]ImageM16-29-7-2017-enfESTA by jose p d, en Flickr[/img2]
las columnas de la creación ( M16 )
TOMAS:
H alfa: 12 Light de 900 segundos; 30 flats, 12 darks y 50 bias
OIII: 8 Light de 900 segundos; 30 flats, 8 darks y 50 bias
SII: 10 Light de 900 segundos; 30 flats, 10 darks y 50bias
PALETA:
HUBBLE
R= SII
G= H-alfa
B= OIII
L= H-alfa
TEMPERATURA: -10 GRADOS
TUBO: FSQ 106 ED
CCD: SBIG ST-8300M
MONTURA: CGEM
CCD guiar: QHY5II
LUGAR: TORREJÓN DE ARDOZ y LAS INVIERNAS (GUADALAJARA)

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HEIC: Cosmic RELICS (Abell 1300)

Postby bystander » Mon Nov 06, 2017 3:02 pm

Cosmic RELICS
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2017 Nov 06

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image seems to sink into the screen, plunging the viewer into the dark depths of the early Universe. Massive galaxy clusters — such as the subject of this image, Abell 1300 — help us to better understand the cosmos. They are essentially giant natural telescopes, magnifying the light from any galaxies sitting behind them and helping us peer further back in time.

This bizarre kind of time travel is possible due to a phenomenon called gravitational lensing, whereby the gravitational influence of a massive object such as Abell 1300 acts like a lens, bending the very fabric of space around it and thus causing more distant light to move in a curved path. To the observer, the source of the light — a background object such as a primordial galaxy, for example — appears both distorted and magnified. The lensing power of massive clusters has helped us to discover some of the most distant known galaxies in the Universe. Hubble has observed this phenomenon many times; see a selection of images here.

This image was taken by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide-Field Camera 3 as part of an observing program called RELICS. The program imaged 41 massive galaxy clusters over the course of 390 Hubble orbits and 100 Spitzer Space Telescope observing hours, aiming to find the brightest distant galaxies. Studying these galaxies in more detail with both current telescopes and the future NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will hopefully tell us more about our cosmic origins.
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby Ann » Mon Nov 06, 2017 3:08 pm

Much as I love the image, I see very few signs of lensing in the picture.

There is an obvious lens (an elongated blue thing) "above" an elliptical galaxy at about 10 o'clock. Other than that, I can't say I can spot any lenses at all.

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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby geckzilla » Mon Nov 06, 2017 7:31 pm

There are two types of lensing. Strong lensing, which is easily noticeable to a human just by looking, and weak lensing, which one may not notice at all. So in this image we are looking at both types. The compact lenses are examples of strong lensing, while the overall massive structure is weakly lensing.
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby Ann » Mon Nov 06, 2017 10:57 pm

Thanks, Geck.

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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby geckzilla » Tue Nov 07, 2017 2:51 am

I don't know how weak lensing can be used like a magnifying glass, though. That explanation seems confusing to me, too.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:18 am

HFG 1 and Abell 6
http://www.karelteuwen.be/photo_page.php?name=PK-136+05-and-PK-136+4.1&img=451&album=15
Copyright: Karel Teuwen
PK136+4.1.jpg

HFG 1 is the large planetary nebula and Abell 6 is the planetary nebula near the centre.
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:01 pm

Sailboat Cluster (NGC 225) and vdB4
http://olegbr.astroclub.kiev.ua/?p=2392
Copyright: Oleg Bryzgalov
NGC225_vdB4.jpg
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:03 pm

LMC
http://www.astrobin.com/235968/0/
Copyright: Andrew Lockwood
e38fc7c852649b20bd29b3bbb2128efe.1824x0.jpg
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Sun Nov 12, 2017 8:50 am

NGC 3125
http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1629a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
potw1629a.jpg
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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Sun Nov 12, 2017 8:52 am

NGC 6334 and NGC 6357
http://www.astrostudio.at/1_Deep%20Sky%20Objects.php?img=images/1_Deep%20Sky%20Objects/222_6357_6334.jpg&PHPSESSID=679be9a35152d88769aa02efdb9c9013
Copyright: Gerald Rhemann

NGC 6334 is the nebula near the top and NGC 6357 is the nebula near the bottom.

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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby Melina » Sun Nov 12, 2017 6:14 pm

The largest sunspot of the 20th century, drawn by Hisako Koyama (小山ヒサ子) on April 5, 1947
http://www.kahaku.go.jp/research/db/sci ... index.html
Copyright: Hisako Koyama/National Museum of Nature and Science

more information in english: https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/s ... un-science

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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby Ann » Sun Nov 12, 2017 6:48 pm

starsurfer wrote:NGC 3125
http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1629a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
potw1629a.jpg


Fascinating image, Geck, and a wonderful galaxy.

It seems to be that there are truly huge numbers of red giants in NGC 3125. There appears to be as many red giants as blue giants or blue clusters outside the tremendous Hα nebulas of this galaxy.

Great picture!

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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby geckzilla » Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:37 am

Ann wrote:
starsurfer wrote:NGC 3125
http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1629a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
potw1629a.jpg


Fascinating image, Geck, and a wonderful galaxy.

It seems to be that there are truly huge numbers of red giants in NGC 3125. There appears to be as many red giants as blue giants or blue clusters outside the tremendous Hα nebulas of this galaxy.

Great picture!

Thanks, though I can't really take credit. That's ESA's work. They always redo images.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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Re: Found images: 2017 November

Postby starsurfer » Mon Nov 13, 2017 8:24 am

vdB1
http://astro-kooperation.com/?attachment_id=1934
Copyright: Stefan Heutz, Wolfgang Ries and Michael Breite
vdB1.jpg
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ESO: A Gigantic Cosmic Bubble (COSMOS-Gr30)

Postby bystander » Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:28 pm

A Gigantic Cosmic Bubble
ESO Picture of the Week | 2017 Nov 13

Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Credit: ESO/T. Contini (IRAP, Toulouse), B. Epinat (LAM, Marseille)
Measuring more than 300 000 light-years across, three times the diameter of the Milky Way, this colourful bubble of ionised gas is the biggest to ever have been discovered. The enormous bubble contains 10 individual galaxies and is situated in a particularly dense region of a galaxy group called COSMOS-Gr30, 6.5 billion light-years away from Earth. Targeted due to its high density of galaxies, this group is extremely varied — some galaxies are actively forming stars while others are passive; some are bright while others are dim; some are massive and others are tiny.

This record-breaking bubble was discovered and studied in detail thanks to the incredible sensitivity of the MUSE instrument, mounted on ESO’s Very Large Telescope. Operating in visible wavelengths, MUSE combines the capabilities of an imaging device with the measuring capacity of a spectrograph, creating a unique and powerful tool that can shed light on cosmological objects that would otherwise remain in the dark.

MUSE’s powerful eye on the sky has allowed astronomers to understand that this large pocket of gas is not pristine, but was expelled from galaxies either during violent interactions or by superwinds driven by active black holes and supernovae. They also studied how this magnificent bubble became ionised. It is believed that the gas in the upper area (shown in blue) was ionised by intense electromagnetic radiation from newborn stars and shock waves stemming from galactic activity. Astronomers suspect that the violent red active galactic nucleus towards the lower left of the image could have ripped the electrons from their atoms.

Ionised gas structure of 100 kpc in an over-dense region of the galaxy group COSMOS-Gr30 at z ~ 0.7 - Benoît Epinat et al
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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HEIC: Cosmic Search for a Missing Limb (NGC 4625)

Postby bystander » Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:52 pm

Cosmic Search for a Missing Limb
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2017 Nov 13

This new Picture of the Week, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the dwarf galaxy NGC 4625, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). The image, acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), reveals the single spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two?

Astronomers looked at NGC 4625 in different wavelengths in the hope of solving this cosmic mystery. Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disc of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot — hence mainly visible in the ultraviolet — stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy. These young stars are only around one billion years old, about 10 times younger than the stars seen in the optical centre. At first astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy called NGC 4618.

They speculated that NGC 4618 may be the culprit “harassing” NGC 4625, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim: The gas in the outermost regions of the dwarf galaxy NGC 4618 has been strongly affected by NGC 4625.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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