Found Images: 2018 September

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 18, 2018 1:15 pm

Abell 194
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/249
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken

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Ann
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by Ann » Wed Sep 19, 2018 1:46 am

NGC 125 and NGC 127
http://www.caelumobservatory.com/gallery/n125.shtml
Copyright: Adam Block
I know that this isn't a brand new image, but it is amazing. Look at the incredible stellar streams of these interacting galaxies! Look at the remarkable "boxy" bulge of NGC 128, indicating a very prominent bar structure. Look at the amazingly red and pink starburst in small galaxy NGC 127, even though there are few signs of ongoing star formation in the other galaxies. And look at the fantastic tidal "bubble" of NGC 125!

This is such a remarkable galactic zoo!

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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 19, 2018 9:08 am

G65.3+5.7
https://digitalstars.wordpress.com/2017 ... -g65-35-7/
Copyright: Charlie Bracken
g65-3.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 19, 2018 9:19 am

Sh2-91
http://buckeyestargazer.net/Pages/Nebulae/Sh2_91.php
Copyright: Joel Short
Sh2_91.jpg
This is the southern part of the supernova remnant G65.3+5.7 and the bright red "star" is a planetary nebula with the interesting name of Campbell's Hydrogen Star.
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 19, 2018 9:23 am

Crescent Nebula (NGC 6888) and Soap Bubble Nebula (PN G75.5+1.7)
http://www.starrywonders.com/crescentbubblesmall.html
Copyright: Steve Cannistra
crescentbubble.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Sat Sep 22, 2018 1:38 pm

M5
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... M5Prim.htm
Copyright: Frank Sackenheim, Stefan Binnewies and Josef Pöpsel
M5.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 23, 2018 11:08 am

NGC 6872 and IC 4970
http://www.karelteuwen.be/photo_page.ph ... 5&album=18
Copyright: Karel Teuwen
NGC6872.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 24, 2018 2:06 pm


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ESO: Leviathan of the Atacama

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 24, 2018 4:44 pm

Leviathan of the Atacama
ESO Picture of the Week | 2018 Sep 24
Chile’s Atacama Desert comprises over 100 000 square kilometres of arid, barren terrain. However, for astronomers working at the largest ground-based astronomical project in existence, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), some of the most important measurements occur on the scale of just a few millimetres.

The ALMA Operations Support Facility (OSF) sits at an altitude of 2900 metres above sea level in the Andes. From here, astronomers, technicians, and engineers can control each of ALMA’s individual 66 antennas, which are located over 2000 metres higher, at 5000 metres elevation, up on the Chajnantor plateau. Getting the antennas up to this plateau presents quite an engineering challenge.

Enter Otto and Lore! These huge orange beasts — one of which is seen here — were specifically designed and built in Germany to carry the 100-tonne antennas from the OSF to Chajnantor (a distance of some 28 kilometres). When they arrive, the leviathan transporters position each antenna with millimetre precision. This incredibly exact positioning is crucial to the array’s scientific operations, and enables ALMA to produce some of the world’s sharpest images of the Universe.

You can see Otto and Lore in action in ESOcast 56: Gentle Giants in the Desert.
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HEIC: Warped and Distorted

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 24, 2018 4:50 pm

Warped and Distorted
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2018 Sep 24
This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image contains a veritable mix of different galaxies, some of which belong to the same larger structure: At the middle of the frame sits the galaxy cluster SDSS J1050+0017.

The gigantic mass of this cluster creates the fascinating phenomenon of strong gravitational lensing. The gravity of the cluster bends light coming from behind it in a similar way to how the base of a wine glass bends light. The effects of this lensing can be clearly seen as curved streaks forming a circular shape around the centre of the frame. Astronomers can use these distorted galaxies to calculate the mass of the cluster — including the mass of the dark matter within it — and to peer deeper into the Universe as otherwise possible. Gravitational lensing does not only distorts the views of galaxies, it also enlarge their appearance on the sky and magnifies their light.

Hubble has viewed gravitational lensing many times, and produced truly stunning images. Astronomers even set up a dedicated programme to study different galaxy clusters which show a great number of lensed galaxies: The Frontier Fields programme. This way some of the most distant galaxies in the Universe were found. With each additional cluster being observed some more distant galaxies are added to this list, slowly completing our picture of how galaxies looked and evolved in the early Universe.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: HEIC: Warped and Distorted

Post by Ann » Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:07 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 4:50 pm
Warped and Distorted
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2018 Sep 24
This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image contains a veritable mix of different galaxies, some of which belong to the same larger structure: At the middle of the frame sits the galaxy cluster SDSS J1050+0017.

The gigantic mass of this cluster creates the fascinating phenomenon of strong gravitational lensing. The gravity of the cluster bends light coming from behind it in a similar way to how the base of a wine glass bends light. The effects of this lensing can be clearly seen as curved streaks forming a circular shape around the centre of the frame. Astronomers can use these distorted galaxies to calculate the mass of the cluster — including the mass of the dark matter within it — and to peer deeper into the Universe as otherwise possible. Gravitational lensing does not only distorts the views of galaxies, it also enlarge their appearance on the sky and magnifies their light.

Hubble has viewed gravitational lensing many times, and produced truly stunning images. Astronomers even set up a dedicated programme to study different galaxy clusters which show a great number of lensed galaxies: The Frontier Fields programme. This way some of the most distant galaxies in the Universe were found. With each additional cluster being observed some more distant galaxies are added to this list, slowly completing our picture of how galaxies looked and evolved in the early Universe.
I love these rich cluster and lensed galaxies images!!!

Geck, the spacetelescope.org page credits you. You have told us before that sometimes they credit you even if you have had little or nothing to do with the image, but perhaps, in this case, you know something about it? For example, do you know what filters were used for it?

I note that the blue features in the image are often sharply blue or blue-green. For example, at middle right, there is what looks like a sharply turquoise edge-on galaxy seemingly falling straight into a sedate-looking yellow disk galaxy, which is itself located to the right of a very similar sedate-looking yellow disk galaxy. That turquoise interloper looks weird. Perhaps it is a background object? Or a foreground object?

Many of the galaxies in the picture are in fact sharply blue, and others sport bright little blue sites of star formation in their yellow arms or disks. I suppose blue represents redshifted ultraviolet light. Knowing what filters were used for the image would be helpful. So if you can help, Geck, I would be grateful!

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Re: HEIC: Warped and Distorted

Post by geckzilla » Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:19 pm

Ann wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:07 pm
Knowing what filters were used for the image would be helpful. So if you can help, Geck, I would be grateful!
Sure, the same filters I used were probably used for ESA's version. Two near-infrared (F160W, F110W) a visible orange (F606W), and a visible blue / near UV (F390W)

Note that the F160W is assigned to red, the F110W and F606W are assigned to cyan, and the F390W is assigned to blue. I recall these are quite hard to get color balanced because they are so red, hence the color assignment for each filter might seem like it doesn't make sense.

You can see more info here:
https://flic.kr/p/PJTDQy
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Re: HEIC: Warped and Distorted

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:25 pm

Ann wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:07 pm

... Geck, the spacetelescope.org page credits you. You have told us before that sometimes they credit you even if you have had little or nothing to do with the image, but perhaps, in this case, you know something about it? For example, do you know what filters were used for it? ...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/geckzilla/31334138924/
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: HEIC: Warped and Distorted

Post by Ann » Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:39 pm

geckzilla wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:19 pm
Ann wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:07 pm
Knowing what filters were used for the image would be helpful. So if you can help, Geck, I would be grateful!
Sure, the same filters I used were probably used for ESA's version. Two near-infrared (F160W, F110W) a visible orange (F606W), and a visible blue / near UV (F390W)

Note that the F160W is assigned to red, the F110W and F606W are assigned to cyan, and the F390W is assigned to blue. I recall these are quite hard to get color balanced because they are so red, hence the color assignment for each filter might seem like it doesn't make sense.

You can see more info here:
https://flic.kr/p/PJTDQy
Thanks, Geck (and bystander)!

Can you explain something to me? Why are F110W and F160W infrared filters, when F390W and F606W are visible light filters? It sounds as if F110W and F160W should detect shorter wavelengths than F390W and F606W, but in reality it is the other way round. What is the logic behind that?

By the way, I noted the strangely green lensed galaxy too. I might have commented on it, except that green isn't a color that makes me very excited or interested... :wink:

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Re: HEIC: Warped and Distorted

Post by geckzilla » Mon Sep 24, 2018 7:44 pm

Ann wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:39 pm
Can you explain something to me? Why are F110W and F160W infrared filters, when F390W and F606W are visible light filters? It sounds as if F110W and F160W should detect shorter wavelengths than F390W and F606W, but in reality it is the other way round. What is the logic behind that?
Apparently the addition of the infrared instruments to HST were kind of an afterthought, but for some reason they (mostly) constrained the naming convention to three digits. You can think of F110W and F160W as having invisible zeroes on the end before the W. For JWST the same naming convention is retained, even though they're all >1000nm filters.
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by barretosmed » Tue Sep 25, 2018 2:53 am

MOON 91.4%

BEST DETAILS
https://www.astrobin.com/full/368207/0/?nc=user

It's not a mosaic.

Equipments:
Esprit 150 mm triplet
Thus 1600mm
Filter L
September 22, 2018
Sao Paulo-SP-Brazil

Copyright: FERNANDO OLIVEIRA DE MENEZES

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Ann
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Re: HEIC: Warped and Distorted

Post by Ann » Tue Sep 25, 2018 2:57 am

geckzilla wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 7:44 pm
Ann wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:39 pm
Can you explain something to me? Why are F110W and F160W infrared filters, when F390W and F606W are visible light filters? It sounds as if F110W and F160W should detect shorter wavelengths than F390W and F606W, but in reality it is the other way round. What is the logic behind that?
Apparently the addition of the infrared instruments to HST were kind of an afterthought, but for some reason they (mostly) constrained the naming convention to three digits. You can think of F110W and F160W as having invisible zeroes on the end before the W. For JWST the same naming convention is retained, even though they're all >1000nm filters.
Thanks, Geck!

And by the way, thanks for pointing out the other two lensed versions of the green weirdo of a galaxy on your Flickr page.

Ann
Last edited by Ann on Tue Sep 25, 2018 5:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by barretosmed » Tue Sep 25, 2018 2:59 am

Moon 91.4% - MY BEST LUNAR ATE TODAY
The same image posted earlier now highlighting the colors

The Moon is usually seen in subtle shades of gray or yellow
The different colors are recognized to correspond to real differences in the chemical composition of the lunar surface.
The blue tones reveal areas rich in ilmenite, which contains iron, titanium and oxygen, mainly titanium, while the orange and purple colors show relatively poor titanium and iron regions.

It is not a mosaic

Best access details:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/368208/0/?nc=user

Colorless version using camera mono
https://www.astrobin.com/full/368207/0/?nc=user

Processing and capture:
Sharpcap, AS3 !, Registax 6, Photoshop, Lightrron, Fitswork4

Equipments
Esprit 150mm triplet
1600mc
Filter L
9/22/2018
Sao Paulo-SP - Brazil
Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 25, 2018 11:14 am

NGC 206
http://astro-koop.de/?attachment_id=2004
Copyright: Stefan Heutz, Wolfgang Ries and Michael Breite
NGC206.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:05 pm

PuWe 1
https://www.astrobin.com/320392/F/
Copyright: Chris Sullivan
KsjSFMe5xiGV_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:10 pm

NGC 300
https://www.astrobin.com/320390/B/
Copyright: Geoff Smith
099cce64200e1ba8fa98bad6c76dd0be.1824x0.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:21 pm

NGC 7497
https://www.flickr.com/photos/130138181 ... 540347861/
Copyright: Yves Van den Broek
38540347861_dc84b8882a.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Sat Sep 29, 2018 1:54 pm

M87
http://www.karelteuwen.be/photo_page.ph ... 7&album=18
Copyright: Karel Teuwen
M87.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 30, 2018 10:58 am

IC 4954-5
http://afesan.es/Deepspace/slides/IC%20 ... la%29.html
Copyright: Antonio Sánchez
IC4954.jpg
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