Found Images: 2018 October

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Found Images: 2018 October

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 01, 2018 1:53 pm


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 400K.

Thank you!

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HEIC: Celestial Fairy Lights (NGC 1898)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 01, 2018 2:06 pm

Celestial Fairy Lights
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2018 Oct 01
This glittering ball of stars is the globular cluster NGC 1898, which lies towards the centre of the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of our closest cosmic neighbours. The Large Magellanic Cloud is a dwarf galaxy that hosts an extremely rich population of star clusters, making it an ideal laboratory for investigating star formation.

Discovered in November 1834 by British astronomer John Herschel, NGC 1898 has been scrutinised numerous times by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Today we know that globular clusters belong to the oldest known objects in the Universe and that they are relics of the first epochs of galaxy formation. While we already have a pretty good picture on the globular clusters of the Milky Way — still with many unanswered questions — our studies on globular clusters in nearby dwarf galaxies just started. The observations of NGC 1898 will help to determine if their properties are similar to the ones found in the Milky Way, or if they have different features, due to being in a different cosmic environment.

This image was taken by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The WFC3 observes light ranging from near-infrared to near-ultraviolet wavelengths, while the ACS explores the near-infrared to the ultraviolet.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Tue Oct 02, 2018 3:12 pm

Longmore 8 and NGC 5121
http://members.pcug.org.au/~stevec/ESO3 ... 3_RC14.htm
Copyright: Steve Crouch
longmore8.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Tue Oct 02, 2018 3:15 pm

Dumbbell Nebula (M27)
http://astrophotography.aa6g.org/Astrop ... f8300.html
Copyright: Chuck Vaughn
m27.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:46 pm

NGC 7538
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/sh2-278
Copyright: Mark Hanson
NGC7538.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:55 pm

Lagoon Nebula (M8)
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo82.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
photo82fb.jpg
photo82f.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:57 pm

NGC 1760
https://www.martinpughastrophotography. ... n-the-lmc/
Copyright: Martin Pugh
NGC1760.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Fri Oct 05, 2018 4:19 pm


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Ann
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by Ann » Fri Oct 05, 2018 6:23 pm

starsurfer wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:57 pm
NGC 1760
https://www.martinpughastrophotography. ... n-the-lmc/
Copyright: Martin Pugh
NGC1760.jpg
NGC 5471
Source: https://slideplayer.com/slide/9303749/ (probably Hubble)

Couldn't resist posting this bright OB region (a mini-galaxy in itself) right outside the great M101.

I have posted it as a comment on Martin Pugh's picture of NGC 1760 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. NGC 1760 and NGC 5471 are pretty similar.

This picture of NGC 5471 by You-Hua Chu makes NGC 5471 look even more similar to NGC 1760.

Ann
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:47 am

Ann wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 6:23 pm
starsurfer wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:57 pm
NGC 1760
https://www.martinpughastrophotography. ... n-the-lmc/
Copyright: Martin Pugh
NGC1760.jpg
NGC 5471
Source: https://slideplayer.com/slide/9303749/ (probably Hubble)

Couldn't resist posting this bright OB region (a mini-galaxy in itself) right outside the great M101.

I have posted it as a comment on Martin Pugh's picture of NGC 1760 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. NGC 1760 and NGC 5471 are pretty similar.

This picture of NGC 5471 by You-Hua Chu makes NGC 5471 look even more similar to NGC 1760.

Ann
Thanks for posting that, never seen those before. The nebulae in M101 and M33 and LMC are awesome! I've always wondered what an internal view of the planetary nebulae in other galaxies would be?
Last edited by starsurfer on Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:49 am

LDN 982
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
LDN982.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 08, 2018 3:50 pm

Sh2-150 and vdB154
https://www.astrobin.com/317799/
Copyright: Tero Turunen
858eb3a5707f51f707a0b370c694f008.1824x0.jpg
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ESO: Through the Hourglass (CK Vulpeculae)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 08, 2018 4:45 pm

Through the Hourglass
ESO Picture of the Week | 2018 Oct 08
This object is possibly the oldest of its kind ever catalogued: the hourglass-shaped remnant named CK Vulpeculae. Originally thought to be a nova, classifying this unusually shaped object correctly has proven challenging over the years. A number of possible explanations for its origins have been considered and discarded. It is now thought to be the result of two stars colliding — although there is still debate about what type of stars they were.

CK Vulpeculae was first spotted on 20 June 1670 by French monk and astronomer Père Dom Anthelme. When it first appeared it was easily visible with the naked eye; over the subsequent two years the flare varied in brightness and disappeared and reappeared twice, before finally vanishing from view for good.

During the twentieth century, astronomers came to understand that most novae could be explained by the runaway explosive behaviour and interactions between two close stars in a binary system. The features seen around CK Vulpeculae didn’t seem to fit this model particularly well,however, puzzling astronomers for many years.

The central part of the remnant has now been studied in detail using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). This striking image shows the best view of the object to date, and traces the cosmic dust and emission within and around CK Vulpeculae to reveal its intricate structure. CK Vulpeculae harbours a warped dusty disc at its centre and gaseous jets which indicate some central system propelling material outwards. These new observations are the first to bring this system into focus, suggesting a solution to a 348 year-old mystery.

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HEIC: Rings upon Rings (Messier 95)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 08, 2018 4:58 pm

Rings upon Rings (Messier 95)
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2018 Oct 08
This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals a spiral galaxy named Messier 95 (also known as M95 or NGC 3351). Located about 35 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (The Lion), this swirling spiral was discovered by astronomer Pierre Méchain in 1781, and catalogued by French astronomer Charles Messier just four days later. Messier was primarily a comet hunter, and was often left frustrated by objects in the sky that resembled comets but turned out not to be. To help other astronomers avoid confusing these objects in the future, he created his famous catalogue of Messier objects.

Most definitely not a comet, Messier 95 is actually a barred spiral galaxy. The galaxy has a bar cutting through its centre, surrounded by an inner ring currently forming new stars. Also our own Milky Way is a barred spiral.

As well as hosting this stellar nursery, Messier 95 is a known host of the dramatic and explosive final stages in the lives of massive stars: supernovae. In March 2012 a spectacular supernova named SN 2012aw was observed in the outer regions of one of Messier 95’s spiral arms. Once the light from the supernova had faded, astronomers were able to compare observations of the region before and after the explosion to find out which star had “disappeared” — the progenitor star. In this case, the star was an especially huge red supergiant up to 26 times more massive than the Sun.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:20 pm

Rho Ophiuchi Nebula (IC 4604)
http://www.pbase.com/tango33/image/160830033
Copyright: Kfir Simon
160830033.i2qDabSC.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:23 pm

Crescent Nebula (NGC 6888)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/manueljas ... 986839001/
Copyright: Manuel Jimenez
37186151601_7a5ed15e3c.jpg
Caution: may contain a soap bubble shaped planetary nebula. :D
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:26 pm

Soap Bubble Nebula (PN G75.5+1.7)
http://www.astronomersdoitinthedark.com ... =145&p=593
Copyright: Scott Rosen
SoapBubble.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:30 pm

Sh2-114
https://www.astrobin.com/321205/0/
Copyright: Rick Stevenson
WSiXps4P3Hrf_1824x0_DtcOZyZl.jpg
Somewhere in this image is the planetary nebula Kronberger 26.
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HEIC: On the Hunt for Newborn Stars

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:16 pm

On the Hunt for Newborn Stars
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2018 Oct 15
This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), shows a patch of space filled with galaxies of all shapes, colours, and sizes. WFC3 is able to view many such galaxies at an unprecedented resolution — high enough to locate and study regions of star formation in a bid to understand how new stars spring to life throughout the cosmos.

Stars are born within giant clouds of gas. These massive clouds, or stellar nurseries, grow unstable and begin to collapse under gravity, becoming the seeds that will grow into new stars. By analysing the luminosity, size, and formation rate of different stellar nurseries, scientists hope to learn more about the processes that can lead to the formation of a newborn star. Studying nurseries within different galaxies will provide information about star formation at different points in time and space throughout the Universe.

Just below centre in this image is a formation of galaxies akin to a smiling face! Two yellow-hued blobs hang atop a sweeping arc of light, forming a celestial object known as SDSSJ0952+3434. The lower, arc-shaped galaxy has the characteristic shape of a galaxy that has been gravitationally lensed — its light has passed near to a massive object en route to us, causing it to become distorted and stretched out of shape.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:28 pm

Gum 41
https://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1413a/
Copyright: ESO
eso1413a.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:30 pm

Dark Doodad
http://www.pbase.com/strongmanmike2002/image/167371385
Copyright: Michael Sidonio
167371385.PDG4jqvL.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:37 pm

CG 11
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=121
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
cg11.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:40 pm

vdB141
http://www.cxielo.ch/gallery/v/nebulae/ ... 1.jpg.html
Copyright: Martin Rusterholz
vdb141.jpg
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