Found Images: 2018 November

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:02 am

RCW 106
https://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1607a/
Copyright: ESO
eso1607a.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:04 am

M100
http://astrophotography.aa6g.org/Astrop ... f8300.html
Copyright: Chuck Vaughn
m100.jpg
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ESO: A Rosette for the VLT

Post by bystander » Mon Nov 19, 2018 4:06 pm

A Rosette for the VLT
ESO Picture of the Week | VLT | FORS 2 | 2018 Nov 19
This colourful image shows a part of the Rosette Nebula in the constellation of Monoceros (The Unicorn). It is an emission nebula, composed of clouds of gas that are made to glow by the radiation emanating from stars within. The Rosette Nebula is a fairly typical example of an emission nebula — but typical does not mean boring! Nebulae are some of the most beautiful celestial objects out there, and they frequently show up spectacularly in images taken by astronomical telescopes, as seen here.

In nebulae such as this, gas and dust are combining to produce a new generation of stars. Initially these newly-formed stars are shrouded in the dusty clouds that gave them birth, and cannot be seen in visible light. But after a while they blow away the denser material and their powerful radiation pours out to ionise the surrounding gas, causing it to glow brightly. These elements are all present in this image — the mixture of glowing gas and dark dust has been sculpted into complex patterns on the sky by the stellar radiation, like smoke around a fire.

This particular image was obtained with the FORS 2 instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), sited in the harsh environment of Chile’s Atacama Desert. FORS 2 is an extremely versatile instrument that can produce very high-quality images (like this one!). It is also a spectrograph that can split the light it collects into a rainbow of colours, giving astronomers information about the chemical composition of objects across the Universe.

This image was created as part of the ESO Cosmic Gems programme, an outreach initiative to produce images of interesting, intriguing or visually attractive objects using ESO telescopes, for the purposes of education and public outreach. The programme makes use of telescope time that cannot be used for science observations. All data collected may also be suitable for scientific purposes, and are made available to astronomers through ESO’s science archive.
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HEIC: Different Generations (NGC 1866)

Post by bystander » Mon Nov 19, 2018 4:16 pm

Different Generations
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2018 Nov 19
Star clusters are common structures throughout the Universe, each made up of hundreds of thousands of stars all bound together by gravity. This star-filled image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), shows one of them: NGC 1866.

NGC 1866 is found at the very edges of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy located near to the Milky Way. The cluster was discovered in 1826 by Scottish astronomer James Dunlop, who catalogued thousands of stars and deep-sky objects during his career.

However, NGC 1866 is no ordinary cluster. It is a surprisingly young globular cluster situated close enough to us that its stars can be studied individually — no mean feat given the mammoth distances involved in studying the cosmos! There is still debate over how globular clusters form, but observations such as this have revealed that most of their stars are old and have a low metallicity. In astronomy, ‘metals’ are any elements other than hydrogen and helium; since stars form heavier elements within their core as they carry out nuclear fusion throughout their lifetimes, a low metallicity indicates that a star is very old, as the material from which it formed was not enriched with many heavy elements. It’s possible that the stars within globular clusters are so old that they were actually some of the very first to form after the Big Bang.

In the case of NGC 1866, though, not all stars are the same. Different populations, or generations, of stars are thought to coexist within the cluster. Once the first generation of stars formed, the cluster may have encountered a giant gas cloud that sparked a new wave of star formation and gave rise to a second, younger, generation of stars — explaining why it seems surprisingly youthful.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 20, 2018 10:12 am

Pipe Nebula
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
Pipe.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 20, 2018 10:14 am

Chamaeleon Molecular Cloud
http://www.pbase.com/strongmanmike2002/image/166916286
Copyright: Michael Sidonio
166916286.az5GHjSd.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:06 am

NGC 891 and Abell 347
https://delsaert.com/2017/10/18/ngc891-and-friends/
Copyright: Bart Delsaert
ngc891.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:08 am

NGC 7789
https://www.flickr.com/photos/avdhoeven ... 924444969/
Copyright: Andre van der Hoeven
14966117803_803a4fb65e.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:11 am

Sh2-115 and Abell 71
https://www.flickr.com/photos/cfaobam/38421280442/
Copyright: Carsten Frenzl
38421280442_6c85aab014.jpg
Sh2-115 is the emission nebula in the centre and Abell 71 is the planetary nebula near the bottom right corner.
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by Ann » Wed Nov 21, 2018 1:32 pm

starsurfer wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:11 am
Sh2-115 and Abell 71
https://www.flickr.com/photos/cfaobam/38421280442/
Copyright: Carsten Frenzl
38421280442_6c85aab014.jpg
Sh2-115 is the emission nebula in the centre and Abell 71 is the planetary nebula near the bottom right corner.
And HD 196178 is the beautiful bright bluish star at 9 o'clock! As prominent at it looks in this image, it is not the source of ionization of Sh2-115 since it is too cool to be able to do that, at spectral class B9. It is still a blue star, though! :D

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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by Ann » Wed Nov 21, 2018 3:27 pm

NGC 5084
http://www.caelumobservatory.com/gallery/n5084.shtml
Copyright: Adam Block

Adam Block has posted a new galaxy image! Yay!

NGC 5084 is classified as an S0 galaxy or a lenticular galaxy, a galaxy that has a disk but no dust or star formation, and NGC 5084 looks pretty much the lenticular part, too. However, Adam Block's image makes it clear that there is dust, although small amounts of it, in the disk. Also there are some young bluish stars in the disk, at about 3 o'clock.

But the colors of NGC 5084 are very red. Its B-V index is 1.110, which is red indeed, since few nearby galaxies have a B-V index higher than 1.000. The U-B index of NGC 5084 is less spectacularly red, testifying to the presence of a few ultraviolet-bright stars.

Please note the remarkably hamburger-shaped background galaxy at about 8 o'clock.

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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Sun Nov 25, 2018 10:57 am

NGC 1325
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/275
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken

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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:01 am

MBM 47
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=126
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
mbm47.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Mon Nov 26, 2018 11:50 am

PK 164+31.1
http://www.cxielo.ch/gallery/v/nebulae/ ... x.jpg.html
Copyright: Martin Rusterholz
pk164.jpg
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HEIC: Tangled — Cosmic Edition (SNR 0454-67.2)

Post by bystander » Mon Nov 26, 2018 3:03 pm

Tangled — Cosmic Edition
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2018 Nov 26
This dark, tangled web is an object named SNR 0454-67.2. It formed in a very violent fashion — it is a supernova remnant, created after a massive star ended its life in a cataclysmic explosion and threw its constituent material out into surrounding space. This created the messy formation we see in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, with threads of red snaking amidst dark, turbulent clouds.

SNR 0454-67.2 is situated in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf spiral galaxy that lies close to the Milky Way. The remnant is likely the result of a Type Ia supernova explosion; this category of supernovae is formed from the death of a white dwarf star, which grows and grows by siphoning material from a stellar companion until it reaches a critical mass and then explodes.

As they always form via a specific mechanism — when the white dwarf hits a particular mass — these explosions always have a well-known luminosity, and are thus used as markers (standard candles) for scientists to obtain and measure distances throughout the Universe.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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Re: HEIC: Tangled — Cosmic Edition (SNR 0454-67.2)

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:47 am

bystander wrote:
Mon Nov 26, 2018 3:03 pm
Tangled — Cosmic Edition
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2018 Nov 26
This dark, tangled web is an object named SNR 0454-67.2. It formed in a very violent fashion — it is a supernova remnant, created after a massive star ended its life in a cataclysmic explosion and threw its constituent material out into surrounding space. This created the messy formation we see in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, with threads of red snaking amidst dark, turbulent clouds.

SNR 0454-67.2 is situated in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf spiral galaxy that lies close to the Milky Way. The remnant is likely the result of a Type Ia supernova explosion; this category of supernovae is formed from the death of a white dwarf star, which grows and grows by siphoning material from a stellar companion until it reaches a critical mass and then explodes.

As they always form via a specific mechanism — when the white dwarf hits a particular mass — these explosions always have a well-known luminosity, and are thus used as markers (standard candles) for scientists to obtain and measure distances throughout the Universe.
There needs to be a Hubble mosaic of the entire LMC! :D

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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:49 am

WDHS 1
http://www.pbase.com/skybox/image/167555554
Copyright: Kevin Quin
167555554.jj8i4SMW.jpg
This planetary nebula is also known as WeDe 1.
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Wed Nov 28, 2018 11:35 am


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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Wed Nov 28, 2018 11:37 am

NGC 300
https://www.flickr.com/photos/97807083@N00/38028693406/
Copyright: Terry Robison
38028693406_621a1e048c.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2018 November

Post by starsurfer » Wed Nov 28, 2018 11:38 am