Submissions: 2019 November

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
gpassera
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by gpassera » Wed Nov 13, 2019 8:32 am

SH2-136 Ghost Nebula
www.giuseppepassera.com

Copyright: Giuseppe Passera
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markh@tds.net
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by markh@tds.net » Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:13 pm

Abell 2151 Galaxy Cluster

Copyright Mark Hanson
Abell2151SmallA.jpg
Description by Sakib Rasool

Abell 2151 is a mighty cluster of galaxies with a surplus of beautiful interacting galaxies. Interestingly its distribution is quite chaotic and lacks the typical central elliptical galaxy that is a common feature of most galaxy clusters. However the brightest galaxy is the elliptical NGC 6041.

In the grand scheme of the universe, Abell 2151 (also known as the Hercules Galaxy Cluster) is located 500 million light years away and covers an area of 6 million light years with about 200 galaxies. It is part of the Hercules Supercluster, which is part of an even larger extragalactic structure simply known as the Great Wall. This has a huge span of 500 million light years and was discovered in the 1980's by Margaret Geller and John Huchra.

One aspect of Abell 2151 that is immediately apparent is the abundance of peculiar and interacting galaxies. In fact, there are so many that a record number of four were included in the Arp Atlas, the most for any galaxy cluster. These include Arp 71 (NGC 6045), Arp 122 (NGC 6040), Arp 172 (IC 1178/81) and Arp 272 (NGC 6050/IC 1179).

NGC 6040 is an interesting pair of galaxies interacting with each other and in the process of being absorbed into the galaxy cluster, its neutral hydrogen gas has been removed through ram pressure stripping, a phenomenon that has been observed in other galaxy clusters. NGC 6050 and IC 1179 represent a titanic collision between two behemoths that have been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, which appears to show a third member in this system.

Arguably the most distinguished member of Abell 2151 is IC 1182, a strange chaotic wreck of a galaxy that was somehow overlooked by Halton Arp. Although it is tempting to perceive the elongated blue structure as a jet launched from its core, it is in fact a tidal tail with a weaker second one near the opposing side. Another famous example of tidal tails being misconstrued as jets are the ones associated with the southern galaxy NGC 1097. In IC 1182, the longer tidal tail has a length of 205,000 light years while the smaller one is 88,000 light years long. It is very llkely its unique morphology is the result of an ongoing merger between two galaxies. Another interesting conclusion drawn from professional studies is that some of the blue knots in the large tidal tail might be in the process of forming tidal dwarf galaxies!

Make sure to take a look at the full resolution image here: https://www.hansonastronomy.com/abell2151

Thank you,
Mark Hanson
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markh@tds.net
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by markh@tds.net » Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:18 pm

Abell 78

Copyright Mark Hanson
Abell78-4small.jpg
Abell78-4CropA.jpg
Called Abell 78, it can be found a few thousand light-years from Earth toward the constellation of Cygnus. In its heyday, it wasn’t all that different from the Sun, only the key difference is, the Sun remains a main-sequence star. Whereas, Abell 78 is dead… it no longer fuses hydrogen into helium—it is now classified as a planetary nebula.

Unlike other nebulae of its kind, Abell 78 belongs to a rare subclass called, you guessed it, born-again planetary nebulae. They have the same nuts and bolts as normal ones. Most important is the white dwarf: the small, but dense, object situated directly in the heart of the nebula. In this instance, the gas surrounding the central star becomes so tightly-packed in certain areas, nuclear fusion starts back up.

“The renewed nuclear activity triggered another, much faster wind, blowing more material away. The interplay between old and new outflows has shaped the cloud’s complex structure, including the radial filaments that can be seen streaming from the collapsing star at the center.”

Telescope: Planewave 24" f6.7 on a Planewave HD Mount Camera: SBIG 16803

Taken at Stellar Winds Observatory, a/k/a Stan Watson Observatory in Animas, NM.

Full Resolution Image can be found here: https://www.hansonastronomy.com/abell-78

Thank you,
Mark Hanson
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pepe30
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by pepe30 » Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:22 pm

Hi,
I attach my attempt to IC 1805 in the Hubble palette

Image
I attach my attempt to IC 1805 in BICOLOR palette (Ha,OIII)
Image
http://astrobook.sk/profile/21/posts/
Peter (pepe30)
Last edited by pepe30 on Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:29 pm, edited 2 times in total.

pepe30
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Posts: 3
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by pepe30 » Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:23 pm

Hi,
I attach my attempt to IC 5070 in the Hubble palette

http://astrobook.sk/profile/21/posts/

Image

Peter
Last edited by pepe30 on Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

pepe30
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by pepe30 » Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:27 pm

Hi,
I attach my attempt to the M63 LRGB, captured in the summer

http://astrobook.sk/profile/21/posts/

Image

Peter

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by Ann » Thu Nov 14, 2019 1:59 am

markh@tds.net wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:13 pm
Abell 2151 Galaxy Cluster

Copyright Mark Hanson

Abell2151SmallA.jpg

Description by Sakib Rasool

Abell 2151 is a mighty cluster of galaxies with a surplus of beautiful interacting galaxies. Interestingly its distribution is quite chaotic and lacks the typical central elliptical galaxy that is a common feature of most galaxy clusters. However the brightest galaxy is the elliptical NGC 6041.

In the grand scheme of the universe, Abell 2151 (also known as the Hercules Galaxy Cluster) is located 500 million light years away and covers an area of 6 million light years with about 200 galaxies. It is part of the Hercules Supercluster, which is part of an even larger extragalactic structure simply known as the Great Wall. This has a huge span of 500 million light years and was discovered in the 1980's by Margaret Geller and John Huchra.

One aspect of Abell 2151 that is immediately apparent is the abundance of peculiar and interacting galaxies. In fact, there are so many that a record number of four were included in the Arp Atlas, the most for any galaxy cluster. These include Arp 71 (NGC 6045), Arp 122 (NGC 6040), Arp 172 (IC 1178/81) and Arp 272 (NGC 6050/IC 1179).

NGC 6040 is an interesting pair of galaxies interacting with each other and in the process of being absorbed into the galaxy cluster, its neutral hydrogen gas has been removed through ram pressure stripping, a phenomenon that has been observed in other galaxy clusters. NGC 6050 and IC 1179 represent a titanic collision between two behemoths that have been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, which appears to show a third member in this system.

Arguably the most distinguished member of Abell 2151 is IC 1182, a strange chaotic wreck of a galaxy that was somehow overlooked by Halton Arp. Although it is tempting to perceive the elongated blue structure as a jet launched from its core, it is in fact a tidal tail with a weaker second one near the opposing side. Another famous example of tidal tails being misconstrued as jets are the ones associated with the southern galaxy NGC 1097. In IC 1182, the longer tidal tail has a length of 205,000 light years while the smaller one is 88,000 light years long. It is very llkely its unique morphology is the result of an ongoing merger between two galaxies. Another interesting conclusion drawn from professional studies is that some of the blue knots in the large tidal tail might be in the process of forming tidal dwarf galaxies!

Make sure to take a look at the full resolution image here: https://www.hansonastronomy.com/abell2151

Thank you,
Mark Hanson

Very nice picture, Mark. I'm always happy to see photos of the fascinating Hercules cluster of galaxies. And I so appreciate the annotated version on your homepage!

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
Ann
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by Ann » Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:07 am

markh@tds.net wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:18 pm
Abell 78

Copyright Mark Hanson

Abell78-4small.jpg

Abell78-4CropA.jpg

Called Abell 78, it can be found a few thousand light-years from Earth toward the constellation of Cygnus. In its heyday, it wasn’t all that different from the Sun, only the key difference is, the Sun remains a main-sequence star. Whereas, Abell 78 is dead… it no longer fuses hydrogen into helium—it is now classified as a planetary nebula.

Unlike other nebulae of its kind, Abell 78 belongs to a rare subclass called, you guessed it, born-again planetary nebulae. They have the same nuts and bolts as normal ones. Most important is the white dwarf: the small, but dense, object situated directly in the heart of the nebula. In this instance, the gas surrounding the central star becomes so tightly-packed in certain areas, nuclear fusion starts back up.

“The renewed nuclear activity triggered another, much faster wind, blowing more material away. The interplay between old and new outflows has shaped the cloud’s complex structure, including the radial filaments that can be seen streaming from the collapsing star at the center.”

Telescope: Planewave 24" f6.7 on a Planewave HD Mount Camera: SBIG 16803

Taken at Stellar Winds Observatory, a/k/a Stan Watson Observatory in Animas, NM.

Full Resolution Image can be found here: https://www.hansonastronomy.com/abell-78

Thank you,
Mark Hanson
I'm usually not a great fan of planetary nebulas, mostly because I can't figure out what their "true color" is, and different pictures of the same planetaries show different colors in them, so I give up.

But your picture of Abell 78 is fascinating indeed. There is a bright inner structure that bears every sign of being lit up by OIII emission. Outside of this blue-green, sharp and tattered structure is a diffuse red Hα halo and what appears to be a blue reflection nebula. All in all, this really speaks of a fascinating past history of this planetary, which you explain in the caption.

And the color and structure of the nebula is fascinating!

Ann
Color Commentator

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Ann
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by Ann » Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:10 am

pepe30 wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:22 pm
Hi,
I attach my attempt to IC 1805 in the Hubble palette

Image
I attach my attempt to IC 1805 in BICOLOR palette (Ha,OIII)
Image
http://astrobook.sk/profile/21/posts/
Peter (pepe30)
Welcome, Peter! You appear to be new here. I particularly like your beautiful pink and blue version of the Heart Nebula. I also really like your picture of M63, which clearly shows the large, almost colorless halo surrounding this galaxy.

Again, welcome!

Ann
Color Commentator

barretosmed
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by barretosmed » Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:11 am

NGC 6744 Galaxy - A galaxy similar to the Milky Way


BEST DETAILS:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/6lvfz1/0/?nc=user

   NGC 6744 is a spiral galaxy believed to be similar to our Milky Way, however, NGC 6744 is almost twice the diameter of the Milky Way.
   It is about 30 million light years away in the southern constellation of Pavo (the Peacock), and is as bright as 60 billion suns.

  I always wanted to record this wonder of the sky, fortunately this year I managed, were 4 nights to make the most of frames and try to make it.


Equipments:
Apo 150mm triplet
Qhy 16200
During the month of July and August
29 L 500 "
47 RGB 300 "
Munhoz - MG - Brazil

Processing and Capture:
Software: PixInsight, Adoble photoshop, APT, PHD, Polemaster, SharpCap

Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: Barretosmed@hotmail.com
My_Picture.jpg
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cosmicwreckingball
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AKA: Matt Harbison
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by cosmicwreckingball » Thu Nov 14, 2019 5:10 pm

Mercury Transit-

Image


Complete Mercury Transit from Cloudland Canyon State Park in Northern Georgia, Eastern United States.

Image explanation: 10 second video and single images were collected every minute during the 5 hour event. Images captured on a Lunt 80PST Hydrogen Alpa telescope and a Lunt 80 Acrhro with an 1800 Ca-K Blocking Filter. We were lucky to have the ingress and egress visible from our location. Throughout the morning until 11 a.m. we enjoyed clear skies, with intermittent clouds persisting until egress. While editing, many stacks included the clouds streaming into the background so I left them as representative of the day. The transit data is a stack of the best single frames out of 250gb of data!

It's a wild looking photo, but should be pretty accurate to the data collected. Northern orientation is close to correct in the photo; top of the photo being North and the Ingress taking place on the Eastern Limb of the Sun and Egress on the Western Limb.
Matt Harbison
President Emeritus, Barnard Astronomical Society of Chattanooga
Cameras, Binoculars, Dobs, Cats, and Refractors. Whatever it takes!

iro
Asternaut
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by iro » Thu Nov 14, 2019 6:02 pm

Ann wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2019 5:10 am

Great picture, Ireneusz! :D

Ann
Thanks Ann for your comment. I'm glad you like the picture :)

bzpc
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by bzpc » Thu Nov 14, 2019 7:03 pm

The smaller big brother.
The smaller big brother.

My most recent photo is the well-known Triangulum Galaxy, also known as the Messier 33 Catalog. It is a nearby (about 3 million light-years) spiral galaxy, the third largest star city in the Local Group after the Andromeda and the Milky Way. Huuu, what is a Local Group? Galaxies are not just randomly scattered throughout the universe. They are gravitationally bound to each other and form smaller, larger sets in the universe around us. The Andromeda Galaxy, Our Milky Way System, and the M33 Triangulum Galaxy are the 3 major major galaxies of the Local Group. They are surrounded by more than 30 attendant galaxies and together they form the Local Galaxy cluster. The Local group is part of the Virgo Super Set. Let's go back to the M33. It was discovered and cataloged by Charles Messier in 1764, although there are sources that Giovanni Batista Hodierna recorded it well before 1654. The galaxy's arms have highly visible ionized Hydrogen clouds, where active star formation is still occurring, many of which are cataloged under a separate number. In terms of size, it is half our Milky Way, with a distance of 3 million light-years, according to the latest measurements. During the processing of the photo, a galaxy that also looked like a spiral was clearly visible in the upper right. This is not a companion to the M33, I tried to search for it, but I didn't get much outside of the catalog number. He's galaxy PGC 5694, so that's not a fun name, but it is. You can see the Triangulum under a dark sky with a binocular, but a larger binocular is recommended for detailed observation.

litobrit
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by litobrit » Fri Nov 15, 2019 5:29 am

Hello,
The two Magellanic Clouds in a single image.
4 Tiles and 15 hours LRGBHaOIII with a Nikon 200 and a ASA20 from Chilescope.
Acquisition Jean-Baptiste Auroux https://millenniumphoton.com and Bernard Michaud https://www.astrobin.com/users/litobrit/
Processing Bernard Michaud.
The full is here https://www.astrobin.com/full/phig1x/B/?nc=user

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Ann
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by Ann » Fri Nov 15, 2019 8:51 am

litobrit wrote:
Fri Nov 15, 2019 5:29 am
Hello,
The two Magellanic Clouds in a single image.
4 Tiles and 15 hours LRGBHaOIII with a Nikon 200 and a ASA20 from Chilescope.
Acquisition Jean-Baptiste Auroux https://millenniumphoton.com and Bernard Michaud https://www.astrobin.com/users/litobrit/
Processing Bernard Michaud.
The full is here https://www.astrobin.com/full/phig1x/B/?nc=user
That's a great image and a fantastic opportunity to really compare the two galaxies! I so appreciate that we can see all of LMC, because the outer parts of it are often cut off. SMC also seems to show off all its parts in all their glory!

Tell me, though. Is SMC a little too big and a little too bright compared with LMC in this picture?

Ann
Color Commentator

Leonardo-Ciuffolotti
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by Leonardo-Ciuffolotti » Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:03 am

Rho Ophiuchi & Antares nebula complex, from Tivoli Astrofarm Namibia.
Samyang 135mm, EOS 50D, Ioptron Skytracker Pro.
Many nebulae have their own names. Rho Ophiuchi and Antares nebula complex has none. Could we call it "The Painter's Palette"? :-)

https://www.astrobin.com/akf6mp/

litobrit
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by litobrit » Sat Nov 16, 2019 6:33 am

Hello Ann.
Yes SMC is a bit too bright ant too large compared to LMC. It is justice to the harm suffered by SMC. ;)
And acquisition of the 4 tiles have not been made same way.
It's only for esthetic purpose. It's not a scientific picture.
Bernard

nlefaudeux

Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by nlefaudeux » Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:25 pm

here are some of my images of the 2019 eclipse recorded in Chile from Cerro Tololo. i have chosen to let the images in their local orientation, ie south up, like it was observed in Chile

the full size images and animations are on my website:
https://hdr-astrophotography.com/
and youtube video of the arrival of the moon shadow
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_B6smC8ZzY

solar corona
https://hdr-astrophotography.com/
Copyright: Nicolas Lefaudeux corona close up
https://hdr-astrophotography.com/
Copyright: Nicolas Lefaudeux earthshine moon
https://hdr-astrophotography.com/
Copyright: Nicolas Lefaudeux double diamond at beginning of totality
https://hdr-astrophotography.com/
Copyright: Nicolas Lefaudeux
https://hdrastrophotography.files.wordp ... nim_c2.gif
apod-anim_c2[1].gif
comparison with 2017 eclipse corona
https://hdr-astrophotography.com/
Copyright: Nicolas Lefaudeux and eventually youtube video of the moon shadow on the landscape
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
moon shadow
https://hdr-astrophotography.com/
Copyright: Nicolas Lefaudeux Nicolas Lefaudeux
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avdhoeven
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by avdhoeven » Sat Nov 16, 2019 2:58 pm

Here is the continuation of my large summer-2018 project.

Image
Little Veil Nebula by Andre van der Hoeven, on Flickr

I had imaged this region for about 13 nights altogether between July and October 2018. You can call me crazy, using so many nights for just one object, in a region where clear nights are rare :) But I really wanted to see if I could catch this beautiful Supernova remnant, and I'm glad it succeeded :)
The overview image shows the constellation of Cygnus and shows where the remnant is found. It's often also called the 'Little Veil Nebula' although it's quite a bit larger in the sky than it's name-share the Veil nebula (seen on the lower left).

Recently Pixinsight was supplied with the new Starnet++ module, which you can use to completely separate the stars from the background. I used this software to enhance the very weak nebulosity and was astonished to see how much more could be drawn from the background compared to the processing I did last year. All other processing was performed using Astropixelprocessor and photoshop.

Supernova remnants (SNR) are formed when a large star ends its life in a supernova explosion. About 300 of these remnants are currently known in our galaxy. One of the most famous remnants, the Veil Nebula, is located in the constellation of Cygnus. Although this is the most famous one in this constellation, it’s not the only SNR. Cygnus contains several obscure SNR’s, among which SNR 65.3+5.7 (also known as SNR 65.2+5.7).
SNR G65.3+5.7 was discovered by Gull et al. (1977) during an OIII survey of the Milky Way. Some parts of this SNR were already catalogued by Stewart Sharpless in his SH2 catalog as SH2-91, SH2-94 and SH2-96, but they were not recognized as being part of a bigger structure at that time. The idea that they could be part of a larger SNR was postulated by Sidney van den Bergh in 1960, but it took until 1977 for this to be confirmed.

This is one of the larger SNR in the sky spanning a region of roughly 4.0x3.3 degrees. Mavromatakis et al. (2002) determined the age of the SNR to be 20.000-25.000 years and the distance about 2.600 – 3.200 lightyears. The shell has a diameter of roughly 230 lightyears! This SNR is a predominantly OIII shell with also some H-alpha signal.

This supernova shell is quite weak and there are hardly any high-resolution images of this region. In the internet maybe 5-10 deep images of this shell can be found and, in most cases, they don’t cover the entire shell or the resolution is quite low because it was done by using photo lenses at short focal lengths. That’s why I decided to see if I could try to image the entire shell using my equipment, a TMB92 refractor in combination with a QSI583ws ccd camera. Because of its large size I needed to make a 3x3 mosaic to cover the whole region.

As so many nights were already necessary to cover the region in OIII I didn’t succeed in grabbing the H-alpha data, but on the internet I found the MDWsurvey (mdwskysurvey.org) initiated by David Mittelman (†), Dennis di Cicco, and Sean Walker (MDW). This is a marvelous project with the goal to image the entire northern sky in H-alpha at a resolution of 3.17”/pixel. I contacted them and told them of my effort to grab imagery of this SNR and they were very kind to provide me with the H-alpha imagery of this region, so that the entire SNR could be brought into view in reasonable high resolution.

This bicolor image shows a combination of about 53h of OIII data (made by myself) and 20 hours of Ha-data (made by the MDW survey) in a single image. In this way the full span of the shell can be seen in all its glory.

Image info:

H-alpha (astrodon 3nm, mdwskysurvey.org):
Telescope: Astro-physics AP130mm starfire
Camera: Fli Proline 16803
5 frames of 12x1200s each

OIII (astrodon 3nm):
Telescope: TMB92SS
Camera: QSI583ws
9 frames, 158 x 1200s total

Wu Zhuoqun
Asternaut
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Aug 08, 2019 1:47 am

Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by Wu Zhuoqun » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:10 pm

Ocean and island in IC 2944

Image

Details: https://www.astrobin.com/36zjm5/?nc=user

Copyright: Zhuoqun Wu

FilippoB

Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by FilippoB » Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:01 pm

Image

Carballada
Asternaut
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by Carballada » Mon Nov 18, 2019 8:52 am

Gamma Cassiopeiae Nebula (IC63)

Image
Gamma Cassiopeiae Nebula (IC63) by Jose Carballada, on Flickr

Only this Ic63 nebula, without the Gamma Cassiopiae star that always appears on captures.
It’s not on the frame but still it's possible feel the strong presence of this big star (at the up-right side of the picture) as a blue light going to the nebula.
Complex nebula to capture (only mag. 10), also with this dominant variable star close who makes so difficult obtain all details and nuances.

It's a 48 hours integration time with a RC10 telescope, narrow band filters in SHO palette and rgb stars with a CMOS camera on a amateur observatory.

All technical detailed information of the capture at Astrobin, Flickr and my blog.

https://www.astrobin.com/xtncj2/
https://flic.kr/p/2hLB1vp
http://http://astro.carballada.com/gamm ... bula-ic63/

tommasostella
Asternaut
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by tommasostella » Mon Nov 18, 2019 11:47 pm

NGC 281 Pacman nebula in HO Palette with OSC camera

Copyright: Tommaso Stella

The photo is the result of an experiment in false colors similar to what you get with the Hubble palette.
Acquiring was carried out with the L-Enhance filter and in post-production the Halpha was assigned
to the green channel and the sum of OIII and Hbeta (cyan and blue) assigned to the Blue channel.
Unfortunately, lacking the information on the SII, it was not possible to obtain a perfect result but,
from an aesthetic point of view, I believe that the image is nice.
Acquiring took place on 1 and 4 October 2019 in Maruggio (Taranto-Italy).

Technical data

Lights: 78x300s @ 200 Gain (-5°C), 49 Dark, 54 Flat

User avatar
Ann
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Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by Ann » Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:58 am

avdhoeven wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 2:58 pm
Here is the continuation of my large summer-2018 project.

Image
Little Veil Nebula by Andre van der Hoeven, on Flickr

I had imaged this region for about 13 nights altogether between July and October 2018. You can call me crazy, using so many nights for just one object, in a region where clear nights are rare :) But I really wanted to see if I could catch this beautiful Supernova remnant, and I'm glad it succeeded :)
The overview image shows the constellation of Cygnus and shows where the remnant is found. It's often also called the 'Little Veil Nebula' although it's quite a bit larger in the sky than it's name-share the Veil nebula (seen on the lower left).

Recently Pixinsight was supplied with the new Starnet++ module, which you can use to completely separate the stars from the background. I used this software to enhance the very weak nebulosity and was astonished to see how much more could be drawn from the background compared to the processing I did last year. All other processing was performed using Astropixelprocessor and photoshop.

Supernova remnants (SNR) are formed when a large star ends its life in a supernova explosion. About 300 of these remnants are currently known in our galaxy. One of the most famous remnants, the Veil Nebula, is located in the constellation of Cygnus. Although this is the most famous one in this constellation, it’s not the only SNR. Cygnus contains several obscure SNR’s, among which SNR 65.3+5.7 (also known as SNR 65.2+5.7).
SNR G65.3+5.7 was discovered by Gull et al. (1977) during an OIII survey of the Milky Way. Some parts of this SNR were already catalogued by Stewart Sharpless in his SH2 catalog as SH2-91, SH2-94 and SH2-96, but they were not recognized as being part of a bigger structure at that time. The idea that they could be part of a larger SNR was postulated by Sidney van den Bergh in 1960, but it took until 1977 for this to be confirmed.

This is one of the larger SNR in the sky spanning a region of roughly 4.0x3.3 degrees. Mavromatakis et al. (2002) determined the age of the SNR to be 20.000-25.000 years and the distance about 2.600 – 3.200 lightyears. The shell has a diameter of roughly 230 lightyears! This SNR is a predominantly OIII shell with also some H-alpha signal.

This supernova shell is quite weak and there are hardly any high-resolution images of this region. In the internet maybe 5-10 deep images of this shell can be found and, in most cases, they don’t cover the entire shell or the resolution is quite low because it was done by using photo lenses at short focal lengths. That’s why I decided to see if I could try to image the entire shell using my equipment, a TMB92 refractor in combination with a QSI583ws ccd camera. Because of its large size I needed to make a 3x3 mosaic to cover the whole region.

As so many nights were already necessary to cover the region in OIII I didn’t succeed in grabbing the H-alpha data, but on the internet I found the MDWsurvey (mdwskysurvey.org) initiated by David Mittelman (†), Dennis di Cicco, and Sean Walker (MDW). This is a marvelous project with the goal to image the entire northern sky in H-alpha at a resolution of 3.17”/pixel. I contacted them and told them of my effort to grab imagery of this SNR and they were very kind to provide me with the H-alpha imagery of this region, so that the entire SNR could be brought into view in reasonable high resolution.

This bicolor image shows a combination of about 53h of OIII data (made by myself) and 20 hours of Ha-data (made by the MDW survey) in a single image. In this way the full span of the shell can be seen in all its glory.

Image info:

H-alpha (astrodon 3nm, mdwskysurvey.org):
Telescope: Astro-physics AP130mm starfire
Camera: Fli Proline 16803
5 frames of 12x1200s each

OIII (astrodon 3nm):
Telescope: TMB92SS
Camera: QSI583ws
9 frames, 158 x 1200s total
I'm not the right person to comment on your image, Andre, since neither bicolor images nor supernova remnants are really my forte. But I am so impressed that you spent so much time on a single object to make the very most of it. I really applaud you! :clap:

Tell me, though. In the caption you wrote the following:
The overview image shows the constellation of Cygnus and shows where the remnant is found.
Where is the overview image? I can't find it.

Ann
Color Commentator

coatesg
Asternaut
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Submissions: 2019 November

Post by coatesg » Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:15 am

h and chi Persei - The Double Cluster

The Double Cluster (comprising NGC 869 and NGC 884) is a beautiful pairing in the constellation in Perseus, located only a few hundred light years apart. The clusters have a combined visual magnitude of 3.7 and 3.8 and are visible to the naked eye as a fuzzy patch between Perseus and Cassiopeia.

Skywatcher Esprit ED80
SBIG STF8300M + Baader filters
MI-250 mount
RGB (125m:115m:115m - all in 300s subs., with additional 25x15sec in each channel for bright star cores)

Taken remotely from E-EYE in Spain:
* Image capture: Graeme Coates & Paul Tribe
* Processing: Graeme Coates

Bonus points for spotting the small fuzz of a galaxy in the field ;-)

Image