Found Images: 2020 February

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bystander
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Found Images: 2020 February

Post by bystander » Sat Feb 01, 2020 3:28 pm


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 500K.

Thank you!

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:14 pm

CaVa 1 and K2-2
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=133
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
CaVa1_K2-2.jpg
CaVa 1 is an extremely faint planetary nebula that was discovered by the French amateur astronomers Jean-Paul Cales and Michael Vanhuysse in 2017. K2-2 was originally considered to be a planetary nebula but was later found to be an ionized ISM nebula that mimics a PN.
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:21 pm

NGC 6822 and Patchick 161
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=151
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
ngc6822_Pa161.jpg
Patchick 161 is an extremely faint planetary nebula candidate at the top of the image that was discovered in 2016 by Deep Sky Hunters member Dana Patchick. The bright planetary nebula is NGC 6818.
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:24 pm

MBM 28 and NGC 2633
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
NGC2633IFN-MBM28.jpg
NGC 2633 is the barred spiral galaxy below the elliptical galaxy NGC 2634 near the bottom right corner of the image.
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Ann
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by Ann » Sat Feb 01, 2020 6:57 pm

starsurfer wrote:
Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:24 pm
MBM 28 and NGC 2633
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
NGC2633IFN-MBM28.jpg
NGC 2633 is the barred spiral galaxy below the elliptical galaxy NGC 2634 near the bottom right corner of the image.

NGC 2633 NGC 2634 IC 520.png
IC 529 and UGC 4841.png


Fantastic image full of great galaxies! :D

Look at the attachment at left. In the center of the picture you find orange K-type star HD 74653. To the upper right of this star is white face on spiral galaxy IC 520 with tiny blue companion galaxy UGC 4634 to the lower right of it. To the lower left of the orange star is white-looking elliptical galaxy NGC 2634 accompanied by a thin sliver of a blue dwarf galaxy, NGC 2634A, above it. Below this galaxy pair is barred spiral galaxy NGC 2633. Note that these three galaxies appear to sit between undulating ribbons of cosmic dust.

In the other attachment you can see a bright yellow-orange star, HD 79517, at center right. Above this star is a blue spiral galaxy, IC 529. To the lower left of it is a very lovely and delicate barred spiral galaxy, UGC 4841, which is so faint - 14th magnitude - that my software just barely managed to acknowledge its presence.

I recommend that you look at these lovely galaxies on Iñaki Lizaso's own webpage, where they show up better.

I love the picture! :D

Ann
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ESO: Venus, Jupiter and the Art of Patience (La Silla)

Post by bystander » Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:58 pm

Venus, Jupiter and the Art of Patience
ESO Picture of the Week | 2020 Feb 03
This remarkable photo shows the ESO La Silla observatory in the foreground with the planets Venus and Jupiter low in the sky and the Milky Way drifting behind them. Yet it took Zdenek Bardon, the photographer, three nights to capture this stunning image; astrophotographers are subject to the whims of the weather and this photo was no exception. He had to wait three days for a crystal clear night with no clouds and low humidity to capture Venus, Jupiter and the Milky Way in all their glory.

La Silla is an exceptional location for astronomy because it has relatively low light pollution which allows the stars to appear crystal clear — although lights from human dwellings are visible on the horizon in this image. The site also offers exceptionally low humidity thanks to its elevation of 2400 metres above sea level. High humidity is a problem for both professional astronomers and astrophotographers. Mirrors and lenses risk being filmed over by condensation and some parts of the electromagnetic spectrum are absorbed by the denser water vapour present in high-humidity atmosphere.

On most nights, this observation site does not experience atmospheric disturbances such as clouds and rain, but very unusually Bardon needed to wait two extra nights for this shot. And it was worth the wait! Not only does it show how beautiful the views are in the Atacama desert, it also demonstrates the high-quality viewing conditions that both the 3.6-metre telescope and the New Technology Telescope, run by ESO, enjoy.

The Milky Way appears as the ribbon of stars across the horizon. Venus is the largest spot of light on the left side of the screen and Jupiter is the smaller dot of light below and slightly to the right.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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HEIC: Nature’s Grand Design (NGC 5364)

Post by bystander » Mon Feb 03, 2020 7:04 pm

Nature’s Grand Design
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 Feb 03
This eye-catching galaxy is known as NGC 5364.

Unmistakably a spiral, NGC 5364 is also something known as a grand design spiral galaxy — a descriptive name deserved by only one-tenth of spirals. While all spirals have a structure that is broadly similar, there is quite a bit of variation amongst individual galaxies; some have patchy, oddly-shaped arms, some have bars of stars cutting through their core, some are colossal and radiant, and others are dim and diminutive. Grand designs like NGC 5364 are in many ways the archetype of a spiral galaxy. They are characterised by their prominent, well-defined arms, which circle outwards from a clear core.

Despite being classified in this way, NGC 5364 is far from perfect. Its arms are asymmetrical compared to other grand design spirals — this is thought to be due to interactions with a nearby neighbour. This neighbour and NGC 5364 are tugging on one another, warping and moving their stars and gas around and causing this misshapen appearance.

This image was captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by barretosmed » Mon Feb 03, 2020 9:36 pm

HORSEHEAD NEBULA AND FLAME NEBULA


It is approximately 1500 light years from Earth.
The Horsehead Nebula is one of the most famous nebulae in the sky. It is visible as the dark indentation of the red emission nebula in the center of the photograph above. The horse head feature is dark because it is actually a cloud of opaque dust that stands in front of the bright red emission nebula. Like clouds in Earth's atmosphere, this cosmic cloud took on a form recognizable by chance. After many thousands of years, the cloud's internal movements will change its appearance.
The alpha channel h was added, I noticed an improvement of the horse's head details beyond the hydrogen rich areas, losing details in the dark nebulae.


BEST DETAILS:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/upvcya/0/?nc=user

BEST DETAILS IN LRGB:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/4vrikm/C/?nc=user

EQUIPMENT:
APO TS 80MM
ASI 1600mm cooled
ASIAIR
10 X 200 BIN2 G
4 X 200 BIN2 B
15 X 200 BIN2 R
20 X 300 BIN1 L
23 X 300 BIN1 HALPHA

GUIDER: asi 120mm mini and ZWO OAG

LOCATION: JALES - SP - Brazil
DATES: DECEMBER 26 TO 28, 2019

Processing and Capture:
Software: @PIxinsigh, Adobe Photoshop, APT, PHD, Polemaster, SharpCap

Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: Barretosmed@hotmail.com
My_Picture.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Tue Feb 04, 2020 7:16 pm

NGC 2655
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/ngc-2655
Copyright: Mark Hanson
NGC2655.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Tue Feb 04, 2020 7:19 pm

HFG 2
https://astrodrudis.com/hfg2-an-unusual ... ry-nebula/
Copyright: Josep Drudis
hfg2.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Tue Feb 04, 2020 7:22 pm

Dr 30
https://www.astrobin.com/tltsy3/
Copyright: Marcel Drechsler and Andreas Zirke
YvOv4nkSxoFH_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Tue Feb 04, 2020 7:24 pm

WR 134 nebula
https://www.astrobin.com/fuq1ub/H/
Copyright: Alberto Ibañez
YA1itxgEdncx_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by barretosmed » Tue Feb 04, 2020 8:31 pm

MOMENTS......

***Equipment:***
Canon 6D
Rokinon 14mm 2.4
Single frame 30 "
Iso 1600


*** BEST DETAILS: ***
https://www.astrobin.com/full/s559dm/B/


PROCESSING:
Adobe Photoshop, PixInsight.


Pousada Campos Misticos
Munhoz - MG - Brazil
06/30/2019

Email: barretosmed@hotmail.com
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Sat Feb 08, 2020 11:34 am


starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Sun Feb 09, 2020 11:07 am


starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Sun Feb 09, 2020 11:08 am

HFG 1
https://pbase.com/skybox/image/170328289
Copyright: Kevin Quin
170328289.tKZ3R5qY.jpg
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ESO: Jupiter’s Corona

Post by bystander » Mon Feb 10, 2020 4:48 pm

Jupiter’s Corona
ESO Picture of the Week | 2020 Feb 10
Stars are surrounded by something known as a corona — a diffuse aura of plasma that appears to surround them in the sky. For the Sun, we can best see this corona during a solar eclipse, when the Moon passes in front of the Sun and covers our star’s face. The solar corona then appears as a bright ring surrounding the eclipsed Sun. An image of the Sun’s corona as seen during a 1999 eclipse can be seen here.

However, there is also the optical phenomenon of a corona, caused by the diffraction of light from a bright object — such as the Sun, other stars, the Moon, and bright planets — by water drops or ice crystals in the Earth’s atmosphere. This is occurring in this unusual image, where a rare corona of the planet Jupiter can be seen above the Atacama Desert in Chile. The beautiful red and green colours in the sky are due to atmospheric airglow, another light-related optical phenomenon. Airglow is explained in detail in this ESOcast.

This image was taken by Petr Horálek some 100 kilometres south of the Chajnantor Plateau, which is home to the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array (ALMA).
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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HEIC: Open Arms (NGC 2008)

Post by bystander » Mon Feb 10, 2020 5:03 pm

Open Arms
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 Feb 10
The spiral galaxy NGC 2008 sits centre stage, its ghostly spiral arms spreading out towards us, in this image captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

This galaxy is located about 425 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Pictor (The Painter’s Easel). Discovered in 1834 by astronomer John Herschel, NGC 2008 is categorised as a type Sc galaxy in the Hubble sequence, a system used to describe and classify the various morphologies of galaxies. The “S” indicates that NGC 2008 is a spiral, while the “c” means it has a relatively small central bulge and more open spiral arms. Spiral galaxies with larger central bulges tend to have more tightly wrapped arms, and are classified as Sa galaxies, while those in between are classified as type Sb.

Spiral galaxies are ubiquitous across the cosmos, comprising over 70% of all observed galaxies — including our own, the Milky Way. However, their ubiquity does not detract from their beauty. These grand, spiralling collections of billions of stars are among the most wondrous sights that have been captured by telescopes such as Hubble, and are firmly embedded in astronomical iconography.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

barretosmed
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by barretosmed » Mon Feb 10, 2020 9:04 pm

The Rho Ophiuchi complex

The Rho Ophiuchi nebular complex is a gigantic and beautiful cloud of dust and colored cosmic gas, located 460 light years from Earth in the constellation Ophiuchus. It is one of the closest stellar nurseries to the solar system and one of the most photographed objects in the night sky.

BEST DETAILS
https://www.astrobin.com/full/5nb1wt/C/?nc=user

EQUIPMENT:
CANON 6D
Canon EF 200mm L II USM f2.8

13 X 180 "
100 BIAS
15 DARKS

LOCATION: MUNHOZ - MG - BRAZIL

DATES: AUGUST 9, 2019

Processing and capture: Software: PIxinsigh and Adobe Photoshop.

Polar alignment with: Polemaster and SharpCap

Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: barretosmed@hotmail.com
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Tue Feb 11, 2020 1:55 pm

M17
https://www.astrobin.com/417808/
Copyright: Mario Richter
0hUIqFzl182J_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Tue Feb 11, 2020 1:57 pm

IC 1318
https://www.astrobin.com/416890/
Copyright: Sergiy Vakulenko
w_93F0FG8zcH_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Tue Feb 11, 2020 2:00 pm

Trifid Nebula (M20)
https://www.astrobin.com/418584/B/
Copyright: Billy Liang
V0KYoNTYFrpA_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by starsurfer » Tue Feb 11, 2020 2:03 pm

Vela Supernova Remnant
https://www.astrobin.com/417387/
Copyright: Tommy Nawratil
XM1caL00iYDx_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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AAS: The Heart of the Rosette Nebula

Post by bystander » Wed Feb 12, 2020 6:37 pm

The Heart of the Rosette Nebula
AAS NOVA Featured Image | 2020 Feb 10
Susanna Kohler wrote:
apjab2da4f1_hr[1].jpg
You’re looking at a 55’ x 55’ Deep Sky Survey image of the Rosette Nebula (click for the full view), a large, spherical, star-forming region located about 5,200 light-years away. In a recent study led by Koraljka Mužić (University of Lisbon, Portugal), a team of scientists has used the Gemini South telescope in Chile to obtain near-infrared images from deep in the heart of the nebula. Zooming in on a region of less than 25 square light-years (the central cyan-outlined region in the photos above and to the right), Mužić and collaborators have imaged the center of NGC 2244, a young, high-density stellar cluster forming massive stars. In their study, the authors seek to understand how low-mass stars and brown dwarfs form and evolve among their high-mass siblings in these extreme environments.

Looking Deep into the Rosette Nebula’s Heart: The (Sub)stellar
Content of the Massive Young Cluster NGC 2244
~ Koraljka Muzic et al
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Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: Found Images: 2020 February

Post by Ann » Fri Feb 14, 2020 8:46 pm

The Wild Duck Cluster (Messier 11)
Photo: Madhup Rathi from Glen Allen, Virginia
Picture of the Day of Astronomy Magazine

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