Found Images: 2020 March

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ESO: The Milky Way above the ELT Site

Post by bystander » Mon Mar 16, 2020 4:21 pm

The Milky Way above the ELT Site
ESO Picture of the Week | 2020 Mar 16
This picture of the week showcases the night sky over the construction site for the Extremely Large Telescope. A beautiful array of stars and the hazy band of the Milky Way are clearly visible above the site. In order to see the Milky Way so distinctly, one must be in an area with low light pollution, such as the Chilean mountain Cerro Armazones, when there is little or no moonlight.

The ELT will be “the world’s biggest eye on the sky” when it begins operating in late 2025. With a 39-metre primary mirror, the ELT will search the sky in the optical and near-infrared wavelength regions for new exoplanets, specifically Earth-like planets in orbit around other stars. The ELT will also be able to perform a kind of “stellar archaeology,” answering fundamental questions about how planets, primordial stars, primordial galaxies and black holes form and evolve.

Perhaps the most exciting goal of the ELT is the possibility of making a direct measurement of the acceleration with which the Universe is expanding. Astrophysicists have known that the Universe is expanding for decades, meaning that the distances between galaxies are increasing. We now think this expansion is accelerating and to directly measure this acceleration would vastly increase humanity’s understanding of our Universe. ...
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HEIC: Cotton Wool Galaxy (NGC 4237)

Post by bystander » Mon Mar 16, 2020 4:30 pm

Cotton Wool Galaxy
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 Mar 16
This Picture of the Week, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the galaxy NGC 4237. Located about 60 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair), NGC 4237 is classified as a flocculent spiral galaxy. This means that its spiral arms are not clearly distinguishable from each other, as in grand design spiral galaxies, but are instead patchy and discontinuous. This gives the galaxy a fluffy appearance, somewhat resembling cotton wool.

Astronomers studying NGC 4237 were actually more interested in its galactic bulge — its bright central region. By learning more about these bulges, we can explore how spiral galaxies have evolved, and study the growth of the supermassive black holes that lurk at the centres of most spirals. There are indications that the mass of the black hole at the centre of a galaxy is related to the mass of its bulge.

However, this connection is still uncertain, and why these two components should be so strongly correlated is still a mystery — one that astronomers hope to solve by studying galaxies in the nearby Universe, such as NGC 4237.
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Wed Mar 18, 2020 6:58 pm

NGC 6820 and NGC 6823
http://www.lievenpersoons.com/astrophot ... c6823.html
Copyright: Lieven Persoons
NGC6820.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Wed Mar 18, 2020 7:00 pm

G82.2+5.3
http://buckeyestargazer.net/Pages/Nebulae/DWB156.php
Copyright: Joel Short
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Wed Mar 18, 2020 7:02 pm

NGC 7789
https://www.astrobin.com/zi6dg9/0/
Copyright: Sergiy Vakulenko
4nFLMn64Nj2l_1824x0_cT9s_z8m.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Sat Mar 21, 2020 3:53 pm


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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by barretosmed » Sat Mar 21, 2020 6:43 pm

The rose of space: I present the rosette nebula in HLRGB


The petals of this cosmic rose are actually a nursery of stars.
What characterizes this image is the sculpture drawn by the globules of dark dust.
The stars emit ultraviolet radiation that ionizes the surrounding hydrogen cloud, which gives the image a red color.


More details:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/qxvoqm/B/?nc=user


EQUIPMENT:
APO TS 80MM
15 X 300 BIN1 HALPHA
15 X 200 BIN2 G
15 X 200 BIN2 B
20 X 200 BIN2 R
23 X 300 BIN1 L

LOCATION: JALES - SP
DATES: DECEMBER 23 - 27, 2019

Processing and capture:
Software: PIxinsigh, Adobe Photoshop, APT, PHD, Polemaster, SharpCap

Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: barretosmed@hotmail.com
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Sun Mar 22, 2020 2:33 pm

LDN 1602
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
LDN1602.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Sun Mar 22, 2020 2:36 pm

LDN 673
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... .php?id=19
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
ldn673.jpg
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ESO: The Cosmos in Motion (ALMA)

Post by bystander » Mon Mar 23, 2020 2:18 pm

The Cosmos in Motion
ESO Picture of the Week | 2020 Mar 23
The entire Universe is constantly on the move, from individual atoms all the way up to massive galaxy clusters. This is beautifully showcased in an image such as this, taken from the Chajnantor plateau some 5000 metres up in the Chilean Atacama Desert. This extremely arid and remote environment is home to the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the largest telescope array in existence.

The blurred object is a specialised transporter, caught in the act of carefully carrying one of ALMA’s 66 high-precision antennas to a specific position on the plateau. By arranging the antennas in more extended configurations, astronomers can obtain far more highly spatially resolved images (meaning that the image is more detailed), while more compact configurations give better sensitivity for sources which spread over more of the sky.

There’s movement going on above, too. Smooth stretches of cloud sweep across the pristine Chilean sky under the watch of Earth’s constant lunar companion. Given its tranquil, lantern-like appearance, it is easy to forget that the Moon is constantly hurtling round the Earth at breakneck speed. Further out, the visible pinpoints of starlight and the fuzzy shapes of galaxies may seem eternal, but of course they too are constantly moving and interacting. The many clear nights that Chajnantor has to offer provide ALMA with the perfect vantage point from which to see this flurry of cosmic activity.
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HEIC: Single Arm Galaxy (NGC 4618)

Post by bystander » Mon Mar 23, 2020 2:31 pm

Single Arm Galaxy
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 Mar 23
NGC 4618 was discovered on 9 April 1787 by the German-British astronomer, Wilhelm Herschel, who also discovered Uranus in 1781. Only a year before discovering NGC 4618, Herschel theorised that the “foggy” objects astronomers were seeing in the night sky were likely to be large star clusters located much further away then the individual stars he could easily discern.

Since Herschel proposed his theory, astronomers have come to understand that what he was seeing was a galaxy. NGC 4618, classified as a barred spiral galaxy, has the special distinction amongst other spiral galaxies of only having one arm rotating around the centre of the galaxy.

Located about 21 million light-years from our galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4618 has a diameter of about one third that of the Milky Way. Together with its neighbour, NGC 4625, it forms an interacting galaxy pair, which means that the two galaxies are close enough to influence each other gravitationally. These interactions may result in the two (or more) galaxies merging together to form a new formation, such as a ring galaxy.
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Re: HEIC: Single Arm Galaxy (NGC 4618)

Post by Ann » Mon Mar 23, 2020 6:15 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 2:31 pm
Single Arm Galaxy
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 Mar 23
NGC 4618 was discovered on 9 April 1787 by the German-British astronomer, Wilhelm Herschel, who also discovered Uranus in 1781. Only a year before discovering NGC 4618, Herschel theorised that the “foggy” objects astronomers were seeing in the night sky were likely to be large star clusters located much further away then the individual stars he could easily discern.

Since Herschel proposed his theory, astronomers have come to understand that what he was seeing was a galaxy. NGC 4618, classified as a barred spiral galaxy, has the special distinction amongst other spiral galaxies of only having one arm rotating around the centre of the galaxy.

Located about 21 million light-years from our galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4618 has a diameter of about one third that of the Milky Way. Together with its neighbour, NGC 4625, it forms an interacting galaxy pair, which means that the two galaxies are close enough to influence each other gravitationally. These interactions may result in the two (or more) galaxies merging together to form a new formation, such as a ring galaxy.
















The "main optical bodies" of NGC 4618 and NGC 4625 are almost mirror images of one another. Both are one-armed spirals. But NGC 4625, unlike NGC 4618, has a vast outlying set of ultraviolet spiral arms.

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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:48 am

NGC 246
https://www.astrobin.com/b4a6xn/
Copyright: Chris Sullivan
rqBqpdgcLJp5_1824x0_PRKu0lSV.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:51 am

NGC 1514
https://www.flickr.com/photos/146686921 ... 005712596/
Copyright: Franz Klauser
49187964043_07f3d9aae3.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:53 am

NGC 1360
https://www.astrobin.com/twd2u5/
Copyright: Alex Woronow
Ochz3dMk16nN_1824x0_Icvml5OZ.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:55 am

MWP 1 and Alv 1
https://www.astrobin.com/j511gt/
Copyright: Douglas J. Struble
uDh5lpKNOFgO_1824x0_kWXURFLk.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Tue Mar 24, 2020 11:06 am

Abell 7
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/362
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken

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AAS: Evidence for Planets in Disks?

Post by bystander » Wed Mar 25, 2020 4:58 pm

Evidence for Planets in Disks?
AAS NOVA Featured Image | 2020 Mar 23
Susanna Kohler wrote:
BDACCE9D-C3EA-400A-B349-CF5AED93AB4F[1].jpeg

Are baby planets responsible for the gaps and rings we’ve spotted in the disks that surround distant, young stars? A new study led by Christophe Pinte (Monash University, Australia; Univ. Grenoble Alpes, France) has found evidence supporting this theory in the images of eight circumstellar disks observed in the Disk Substructures at High Angular Resolution (DSHARP) project. DSHARP uses the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to explore the gas distributed within the disks around young stars. In the image ... the left-most panel shows the 1.3-millimeter dust continuum images of five complex circumstellar disks. The panels to the right show gas measurements for each disk in different velocity channels, revealing “velocity kinks” — deviations from the normal Keplerian velocity expected from unperturbed, orbiting gas. According to Pinte and collaborators, the kinks signatures of planets that perturb the gas flow in their vicinity.

Nine Localized Deviations from Keplerian Rotation in the DSHARP Circumstellar Disks:
Kinematic Evidence for Protoplanets Carving the Gaps
~ C. Pinte et al
viewtopic.php?p=283407#p283407
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Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by Ann » Sun Mar 29, 2020 10:24 am

Stay Home Message on the Matterhorn Mountain Under the Stars
https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/03/27/ ... -mountain/
Photo: Valentin Flauraud/AP

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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Sun Mar 29, 2020 5:15 pm

NGC 5078 and NGC 5101
http://www.astro-austral.cl/imagenes/ga ... 1/info.htm
Copyright: José Joaquin Pérez
ngc5078.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Mon Mar 30, 2020 11:40 am

M73
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... rs/M73.htm
Copyright: R. Sparenberg, S. Binnewies and V. Robering
M73.jpg
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ESO: A Celestial Rocket

Post by bystander » Mon Mar 30, 2020 3:54 pm

A Celestial Rocket
ESO Picture of the Week | 2020 Mar 30
This Picture of the Week captures the Milky Way streaking across the skies above the Chilean Atacama Desert. Dark wisps of interstellar dust form a turbulent mix with the bright glow of hot gas and billions of stars, creating a scene reminiscent of the thick smoke trail of a rocket after launch.

In contrast to the tempestuous sight above, a tower at ESO’s Paranal Observatory stands serenely beneath the evening sky. Paranal is home to the Very Large Telescope (VLT), a ground-breaking observatory composed of four Unit Telescopes and four movable Auxiliary Telescopes. The telescopes can be used in different combinations to form an interferometer, combining the light they collect and allowing astronomers to study the Universe in spectacular resolution.

The VLT has achieved many scientific firsts over the years, including tracking individual stars orbiting the centre of the Milky Way at unprecedented speeds. This indicated the presence of a powerful gravitational field, providing evidence that a supermassive black hole — named Sagittarius A* — lurks there.
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HEIC: Feeding Time (NGC 4651)

Post by bystander » Mon Mar 30, 2020 3:59 pm

Feeding Time
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 Mar 30
This remarkable spiral galaxy, known as NGC 4651, may look serene and peaceful as it swirls in the vast, silent emptiness of space, but don’t be fooled — it keeps a violent secret. It is believed that this galaxy consumed another smaller galaxy to become the large and beautiful spiral that we observe today.

Although only a telescope like the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which captured this image, could give us a picture this clear, NGC 4651 can also be observed with an amateur telescope — so if you have a telescope at home and a star-gazing eye, look out for this glittering carnivorous spiral.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: HEIC: Feeding Time (NGC 4651)

Post by Ann » Mon Mar 30, 2020 8:04 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon Mar 30, 2020 3:59 pm
Feeding Time
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 Mar 30
This remarkable spiral galaxy, known as NGC 4651, may look serene and peaceful as it swirls in the vast, silent emptiness of space, but don’t be fooled — it keeps a violent secret. It is believed that this galaxy consumed another smaller galaxy to become the large and beautiful spiral that we observe today.

Although only a telescope like the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which captured this image, could give us a picture this clear, NGC 4651 can also be observed with an amateur telescope — so if you have a telescope at home and a star-gazing eye, look out for this glittering carnivorous spiral.

















R Jay GaBany's images show the jets of NGC 4651. The orientation of the Hubble image is not the same as the orientation of GaBany's image. Judging from GaBany's image, however, the jet of NGC 4651 appears to emerge from a location very close to the foreground star seen at 8 o'clock in the Hubble image.

Another great image of NGC 4651 is this one by Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Coelum.


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Re: Found Images: 2020 March

Post by starsurfer » Tue Mar 31, 2020 10:59 am

M38
https://www.astrobin.com/0kw50j/
Copyright: Tommy Nawratil
rA2CF4BLJfqP_1824x0_kWXURFLk.jpg
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