Where is the big hole situated ?

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Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby dorusone » Tue Mar 08, 2011 12:10 pm

Hello and greetings from the netherlands,

i did read somewhere that there is a big hole in the universe
where is it situated ?

i am using microsofts worldwide telescope (very good program imho)
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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby hairnet » Wed Mar 09, 2011 11:41 am

I fear something has got lost in translation! I havn't heard of such a thing...
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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby neufer » Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:00 pm

dorusone wrote:
Hello and greetings from the netherlands,

i did read somewhere that there is a big hole in the universe
where is it situated ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WMAP_cold_spot wrote:
<<The CMB Cold Spot or WMAP Cold Spot is a region of the sky seen in microwaves which analysis found to be unusually large and cold relative to the expected properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). The "cold spot" is approximately 70 µK colder than the average CMB temperature (approximately 2.7 K), whereas the root mean square of typical temperature variations is only 18 µK.

The radius of the "cold spot" is about 5°; it is centered at the galactic coordinate lII = 207.8°, bII = −56.3° (equatorial: α = 03h 15m 05s, δ = -19° 35′ 02″. Thus it is in the southern hemisphere of the celestial sphere, in the direction of the constellation Eridanus.

Typically, the largest fluctuations of the primordial CMB temperature occur on angular scales of about 1°. Thus a cold region as large as the "cold spot" appears very unlikely, given generally accepted theoretical models. Various alternative explanations exist, including a so-called Eridanus Supervoid or Great Void. This would be an extremely large region of the universe, roughly 150 Mpc or 500 million light-years across, at redshift Image, containing a density of matter much smaller than the average density at that redshift. Such a void would affect the observed CMB via the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. If a comparable supervoid did exist, it would be one of the largest structures in the observable Universe.

In the first year of data recorded by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) a region of sky in the constellation Eridanus was found to be cooler than the surrounding area. Subsequently, using the data gathered by WMAP over 3 years, the statistical significance of such a large, cool region was estimated. The probability of finding a deviation at least as high in Gaussian simulations was found to be 1.85%. Thus it appears unlikely, but not impossible, that the cold spot was generated by the standard mechanism of quantum fluctuations during cosmological inflation, which in most inflationary models gives rise to Gaussian statistics. The cold spot may also, as suggested in the references above, be a signal of non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations.
Image
The mean ISW imprint 50 supervoids have on the
Cosmic Microwave Background: color scale from -20 to +20 µK.

WMAP Cold Spot

Image
One possible explanation of the cold spot is a huge void between us and the primordial CMB. Voids can produce a cooler region than surrounding sightlines from the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect or Rees-Sciama effect. This effect would be much smaller if dark energy weren't stretching the void as photons went through it.

Rudnick et al. found a dip in NVSS galaxy number counts in the direction of the Cold Spot, suggesting the presence of a supervoid. Since then, some additional works have cast doubt on the supervoid explanation. The correlation between the NVSS dip and the Cold Spot was found to be marginal using a more conservative statistical analysis. Also, a direct survey for galaxies in several one-degree-square fields within the Cold Spot found no evidence for a supervoid. However, the supervoid explanation has not been ruled out entirely; it remains intriguing, since supervoids do seem capable of affecting the CMB measurably.

Although large voids are known in the universe, a void would have to be exceptionally vast to explain the cold spot, perhaps 1000 times larger in volume than expected typical voids. It would be 6 billion–10 billion light-years away and nearly one billion light-years across, and would be perhaps even more improbable to occur in the large scale structure than the WMAP cold spot would be in the primordial CMB.

In late 2007, Cruz et al. argued that the Cold Spot could be due to a cosmic texture, a remnant of a phase transition in the early Universe. This is an exotic explanation, but worth considering since a supervoid would have to be so big to produce the Cold Spot.

A controversial claim by Laura Mersini-Houghton is that it could be the imprint of another universe beyond our own, caused by quantum entanglement between universes before they were separated by cosmic inflation. Laura Mersini-Houghton said, "Standard cosmology cannot explain such a giant cosmic hole" and made the remarkable hypothesis that the WMAP cold spot is "… the unmistakable imprint of another universe beyond the edge of our own." If true this provides the first empirical evidence for a parallel universe (though theoretical models of parallel universes existed previously). It would also support string theory. The team claims there are testable consequences for its theory. If the parallel universe theory is true there will be a similar void in the opposite hemisphere of the Celestial sphere, (which New Scientist reported to be the Southern hemisphere-the results of the New Mexico array study reported as Northern hemisphere).

A sophisticated method of data analysis - Kolmogorov complexity - has derived evidence for a north and a south cold spots in the satellite data: "...among the high randomness regions is the southern non-Gaussian anomaly, the Cold Spot, with a stratification expected for the voids. Existence of its counterpart, a Northern Cold Spot with almost identical randomness properties among other low-temperature regions is revealed."

That these predictions and others were made prior to the measurements see Laura Mersini. However, apart from the Southern Cold Spot, the varied statistical methods in general fail to confirm each other regarding a Northern Cold Spot. The 'K-map' used to detect the Northern Cold Spot was noted to have twice the measure of randomness measured in the standard model - the reason is speculated to be the randomness introduced by voids (unaccounted for voids were speculated to be the reason for the increased randomness above the standard model).

Researchers at the University of Michigan pointed out that the cold spot is mainly anomalous because it stands out compared to the relatively hot ring around it; it is not unusual if one only considers the size and coldness of the spot itself. More technically, its detection and significance depends on using a compensated filter like a Mexican hat wavelet to find it.>>
Last edited by neufer on Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby owlice » Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:04 pm

The circled one reminds me of tri-beads: Image
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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby neufer » Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:37 pm

owlice wrote:The circled one reminds me of tri-beads: Image

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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby BMAONE23 » Wed Mar 09, 2011 4:59 pm

dorusone wrote:Hello and greetings from the netherlands,

i did read somewhere that there is a big hole in the universe
where is it situated ?

i am using microsofts worldwide telescope (very good program imho)

Is this what you are refering to?
http://www.nrao.edu/pr/2007/coldspot/
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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby Chris Peterson » Wed Mar 09, 2011 5:05 pm


I had not considered that particular interpretation of the question. Other possibilities: the black hole at the center of the Milky Way, which has been in the news quite a bit because of recent measurements, or the recently announced super-supermassive black hole, the largest yet observed.
Chris

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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby Beyond » Wed Mar 09, 2011 5:19 pm

Neufer didn't put it this way, but it looks like Shanghai shanghied Gumby and painted him blue. The NERVE of them :!: :!:
haibao-shanghied Gumby.jpg
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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby BMAONE23 » Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:08 pm

Beyond wrote:Neufer didn't put it this way, but it looks like Shanghai shanghied Gumby and painted him blue. The NERVE of them :!: :!:
haibao-shanghied Gumby.jpg

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Re: Where is the big hole situated ?

Postby jybroner » Sun Mar 13, 2011 10:27 am

I guess it's not a hole.
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