My entry level telescope.

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babaonet
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My entry level telescope.

Post by babaonet » Sat Aug 13, 2011 11:24 am

Dear friends, i am happy to say that i have recently brought an entry level 90X refractor telescope. But unfortunately, its not of a very good quality. Besides, I am not sure whether I can watch the planets. The technical detail of the telescope is given below. Kindly put your valuable comments.
Diameter : 50mm
Focal length : 360mm
Eyepiec1 : H6mm
Eyepiec2 : H20mm
Extra 1.5X erecting eyepiec

starman
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by starman » Thu Aug 18, 2011 5:22 pm

Hi,
Sorry - it looks as though you've bought what is essentially a toy telescope. These things are as ubiquitous as horse doodoos and just as smelly. You would be far better off returning it (if possible) and spending the money on a pair of binoculars. 10 x 50 would be good, and it would be nice to have something like a camera tripod to mount them on (you may already have one!).
Only ever buy a telescope / accessories from a proper astronomical equipment supplier. A lady friend of mine got her husband one of 'your' telescopes for christmas last year, and it is completely useless. It's such a shame that the shysters who make these 'telescopes' often put well-meaning people such as yourself off astronomy.

zerro1
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by zerro1 » Thu Aug 18, 2011 10:17 pm

for planetary viewing, you're going to desire something with a bit more reach than a 360 focal length scope. what's going to be enough to satisfy your desire to observe? Binoculars were suggested, and I think that's a good place to start. I have an 8" meade Schmidt-Cass that has a Focal length of 2000mm on a tracking mount. It's not bad for viewing, slow optics(f/10), but I think the best view I've had was looking through a Large 16 inch Dobsonian Telescope(fast optics) at the Table Mountain Star Party. I highly suggest that you seek out a star party locally, or one of the local astronomy clubs, and attend one of their outings. That way, you'll have the oportunity to see what various telescopes and eye pieces can do for your viewing. You'll have a better feel for what you want to shop for!

babaonet
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by babaonet » Sat Aug 20, 2011 7:03 am

Right. Yesterday I got the chance to test my telescope and I realized that its nothing but just a toy. I thank good that I had not spend much money for it. Now I am planning to purchase a better one. Orion 76mm reflector telescope.

bactame
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by bactame » Thu Sep 15, 2011 6:51 am

Buying a telescope should be preceded by the understanding of what will be seen once you commit to a purchase. Stars are points of light and only points of light. A telescope allows you to see many more of them and that is all. The only star that isn't a point of light is the sun and generally never use a telescope to see the sun. In fact even the moon can be a blinding experience with modern telescopes.

If you persist and since the prices on optical equipment are getting very attractive in these times of a recession of personal income, then realize that a camera will enhance your objective of seeing the 'stars' of interest because a camera can explore nebula and other transitory astronomical objects. The camera is important because it lets you collect light in a way that the eyeball just can't accomplish. Besides binoculars and telescopes there are spotting scopes which bird lovers and hunting enthusiasts employ.

Finally there is the problem of portability to consider and it is a big problem because it provides an excuse not to use your equipment.

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Chris Peterson
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by Chris Peterson » Thu Sep 15, 2011 1:33 pm

bactame wrote:Buying a telescope should be preceded by the understanding of what will be seen once you commit to a purchase. Stars are points of light and only points of light. A telescope allows you to see many more of them and that is all. The only star that isn't a point of light is the sun and generally never use a telescope to see the sun. In fact even the moon can be a blinding experience with modern telescopes.
A telescope also allows you to see the color of stars that would otherwise be unapparent to the naked eye. The Sun can be safely viewed using a telescope if the proper filter is used on the aperture. The Moon is never brighter through a telescope than it is with the naked eye; it seems so bright because it is larger, and because you are dark adapted, but it is never unsafe to use a telescope on the Moon.
Chris

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neufer
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by neufer » Thu Sep 15, 2011 1:38 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
... it is never unsafe to use a telescope on the Moon.
A spacesuit is recommended, however.
Art Neuendorffer

babaonet
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by babaonet » Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:07 am

zerro1 wrote:for planetary viewing, you're going to desire something with a bit more reach than a 360 focal length scope. what's going to be enough to satisfy your desire to observe? Binoculars were suggested, and I think that's a good place to start. I have an 8" meade Schmidt-Cass that has a Focal length of 2000mm on a tracking mount. It's not bad for viewing, slow optics(f/10), but I think the best view I've had was looking through a Large 16 inch Dobsonian Telescope(fast optics) at the Table Mountain Star Party. I highly suggest that you seek out a star party locally, or one of the local astronomy clubs, and attend one of their outings. That way, you'll have the oportunity to see what various telescopes and eye pieces can do for your viewing. You'll have a better feel for what you want to shop for!
What about Orion SkyScanner 100 mm reflector telescope? Can I expect to see all the major planet and some messiers objects?

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neufer
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by neufer » Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:02 pm

babaonet wrote:
What about Orion SkyScanner 100 mm reflector telescope? Can I expect to see all the major planet and some messiers objects?
Some questions:

1) How much are you willing to spend?
2) Do you live in (or near) a location with dark skies?
3) If not, would you consider using an online telescope?
4) Are you ever really going to be satisfied with images that are no more than pale shadows of what you can now see in APOD images, in books, online, etc. ?
http://www.universetoday.com/ wrote:
Question: What’s the Best Beginner Telescope?
by Fraser Cain on September 19, 2011

<<We get this question the time. People want to get into astronomy, and they want to get their first telescope. So, to all you experienced astronomers reading Universe Today, what do you suggest people consider for their first starting telescope? We’ve heard lots of horror stories about bad quality department store telescopes, so where should people go? How much should they expect to spend? Who are some good telescope manufacturers? What should people avoid?

My first answer is always to suggest that people use a planisphere and their own eyes in the beginning, learning the constellations. Then graduating to binoculars if they’re still enjoying the hobby before even considering a telescope purchase.>>
Art Neuendorffer

babaonet
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by babaonet » Tue Sep 20, 2011 4:14 pm

Dear Neufer, I m sorry but I did not get the appropriate answer of my question in your answer. I know in the very beginning one should introduce himself with the constellations with naked eyes. I myself have been watching most of the constellations and planets for more than 3 years. But now I m getting bore and want to buy a telescope. Orion SkyScanner 100 mm reflector telescope is ranging from $99.95 to $180.00. And I expected to see the Jupiter with its red spot and at least 4 moons.

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owlice
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by owlice » Tue Sep 20, 2011 4:54 pm

If you have an astronomy club near you, please join that, or at least go to some of its open telescope events. That will help acquaint you with different telescopes and what their abilities are. Generally, people who offer the public opportunities to look at the sky through their telescopes LOVE to talk about their equipment. You will be much better informed by doing that than by just reading what people have to say, because your eyes will help guide you.
A closed mouth gathers no foot.

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neufer
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by neufer » Tue Sep 20, 2011 4:54 pm

babaonet wrote:Dear Neufer, I m sorry but I did not get the appropriate answer of my question in your answer. I know in the very beginning one should introduce himself with the constellations with naked eyes. I myself have been watching most of the constellations and planets for more than 3 years. But now I m getting bore and want to buy a telescope. Orion SkyScanner 100 mm reflector telescope is ranging from $99.95 to $180.00. And I expected to see the Jupiter with its red spot and at least 4 moons.
I expect that you will indeed see Jupiter and at least 4 moons...perhaps even a red spot.

I also expect that the Orion SkyScanner 100 mm reflector telescope will soon be deep in your closet when you get bored with seeing that.

The number of things to discover in astronomy are virtually limitless.

The number of things to discover with an Orion SkyScanner 100 mm reflector telescope you can probably count with your fingers.
Art Neuendorffer

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Chris Peterson
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by Chris Peterson » Tue Sep 20, 2011 7:13 pm

babaonet wrote:Dear Neufer, I m sorry but I did not get the appropriate answer of my question in your answer. I know in the very beginning one should introduce himself with the constellations with naked eyes. I myself have been watching most of the constellations and planets for more than 3 years. But now I m getting bore and want to buy a telescope. Orion SkyScanner 100 mm reflector telescope is ranging from $99.95 to $180.00. And I expected to see the Jupiter with its red spot and at least 4 moons.
I'll second Owlice's suggestion to find an astronomy club. However, while many cheap telescopes are junk that will end up in your closet, Orion is a reputable company, and anything you get will be good value for the money.
Chris

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geckzilla
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by geckzilla » Tue Oct 11, 2011 3:13 pm

Hey now, my cheap telescope ended up in the trash because I broke it somehow (I was what, 8?). Don't let it end up in the closet! Just hand it to the nearest child.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

starman
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Re: My entry level telescope.

Post by starman » Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:48 pm

It may now be too late but I'd say that a 100mm reflector is just on the border of being some good. You would be better going for a minimum of 150mm for newtonians. It also depends on what you want to observe. Me, I observe only variable stars (quite often faint ones, 16th magnitude and suchlike). So I need aperture. I don't need a driven, or even equatorial, mount. I won't be doing photography, CCD imaging or anything like that. So I can put all my financial eggs (such as they are!) into the aperture basket. I use a 36cm (14-and-a-bit inches) newtonian. If you want to observe (say) planets then definition is more of an issue, and you might go for a refractor, though they tend to be more expensive.
I presume at the moment you just want to see the pretty and interesting stuff in the sky. So though you don't need a huge telescope right now - but you do need something that won't leave you disappointed. If you don't plan on doing CCD imaging or anything fancy then you don't need to spend money on an equatorial stand. I'd say go for a 150mm or so Dobsonian. The Dobsonian mount is quick, easy, low-maintenance - and inexpensive.
But please remember - ALWAYS use a proper astronomical supplier, not a high-street camera shop or anything like that.
Bonne chance!