Super Massive Black Hole(s)

Ask questions, find resources, browse the virtual shelves.

Super Massive Black Hole(s)

Postby ErnieM » Mon Sep 05, 2011 2:49 pm

What happens when a black hole gets close to another black hole? Is there such a phenomenon as multiple black holes system? If black holes eventually eat each other, then one can imagine a single super massive black hole with two opposite super long and expansive jet streams. Is it inconceivable to imagine that this is the shape and geometry of our expanding "universe" (and others as there could be more than one) and we presumably "live" in one of the Picard horn shaped jet stream?
ErnieM
Asternaut

Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 7:58 am
ErnieM
Science Officer
 
Posts: 142
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 1:58 pm

Re: Super Massive Black Hole(s)

Postby Chris Peterson » Mon Sep 05, 2011 3:17 pm

ErnieM wrote:What happens when a black hole gets close to another black hole? Is there such a phenomenon as multiple black holes system? If black holes eventually eat each other, then one can imagine a single super massive black hole with two opposite super long and expansive jet streams. Is it inconceivable to imagine that this is the shape and geometry of our expanding "universe" (and others as there could be more than one) and we presumably "live" in one of the Picard horn shaped jet stream?

viewtopic.php?f=30&t=25143#p156860
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com
User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
 
Posts: 9227
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Colorado, USA

Re: Super Massive Black Hole(s)

Postby ErnieM » Mon Mar 25, 2013 5:36 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
ErnieM wrote:What happens when a black hole gets close to another black hole? Is there such a phenomenon as multiple black holes system? If black holes eventually eat each other, then one can imagine a single super massive black hole with two opposite super long and expansive jet streams. Is it inconceivable to imagine that this is the shape and geometry of our expanding "universe" (and others as there could be more than one) and we presumably "live" in one of the Picard horn shaped jet stream?

viewtopic.php?f=30&t=25143#p156860


Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Many thanks to all that contributed to shining some light to my original query.

Here is an update from Space Rip - Published on Sep 26, 2012. I got my answers, and more, from this video.

"Meet the new record-holder for the LARGEST BLACK HOLE IN THE UNIVERSE (so far) in this EXPANDED and UPDATED version (in 1080p) of our most popular Cosmic Journeys episode.

Our Milky Way may harbor millions of black holes... the ultra dense remnants of dead stars. But now, in the universe far beyond our galaxy, there's evidence of something far more ominous. A breed of black holes that has reached incomprehensible size and destructive power. Just how large, and violent, and strange can they get?

A new era in astronomy has revealed a universe long hidden to us. High-tech instruments sent into space have been tuned to sense high-energy forms of light -- x-rays and gamma rays -- that are invisible to our eyes and do not penetrate our atmosphere. On the ground, precision telescopes are equipped with technologies that allow them to cancel out the blurring effects of the atmosphere. They are peering into the far reaches of the universe, and into distant caldrons of light and energy. In some distant galaxies, astronomers are now finding evidence that space and time are being shattered by eruptions so vast they boggle the mind.

We are just beginning to understand the impact these outbursts have had on the universe: On the shapes of galaxies, the spread of elements that make up stars and planets, and ultimately the very existence of Earth. The discovery of what causes these eruptions has led to a new understanding of cosmic history. Back in 1995, the Hubble space telescope was enlisted to begin filling in the details of that history. Astronomers selected tiny regions in the sky, between the stars. For days at a time, they focused Hubble's gaze on remote regions of the universe.

These hubble Deep Field images offered incredibly clear views of the cosmos in its infancy. What drew astronomers' attention were the tiniest galaxies, covering only a few pixels on Hubble's detector. Most of them do not have the grand spiral or elliptical shapes of large galaxies we see close to us today.

Instead, they are irregular, scrappy collections of stars. The Hubble Deep Field confirmed a long-standing idea that the universe must have evolved in a series of building blocks, with small galaxies gradually merging and assembling into larger ones.
"
ErnieM
Science Officer
 
Posts: 142
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 1:58 pm


Return to The Library: Information Desk and Educational Resources

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], CommonCrawl [Bot] and 3 guests