TR: Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System

Find out the latest thinking about our universe.
User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 17668
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

TR: Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System

Post by bystander » Fri Mar 12, 2010 11:17 pm

Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System
Technology Review: Physics arXiv Blog - 2010 March 12
A new set of star velocity data indicates that Gliese 710 has an 86 percent chance of ploughing into the Solar System within the next 1.5 million years.
http://arxiv.org/abs/1003.2160

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15428
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Orange ja glad 'a Gliese 710

Post by neufer » Fri Mar 12, 2010 11:41 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_710 wrote:
<<Gliese 710 is an orange dwarf star (K7 spectral class) in the constellation Serpens Cauda, with visual magnitude 9.66 and a mass of 0.4–0.6 solar masses. It is about 63.0 light years from Earth, but is notable because its proper motion, distance, and radial velocity indicate that it will approach within 1.1 light years (70,000 AU) from Earth within 1.4 million years, based on the latest Hipparcos data. At closest approach it will be a first-magnitude star about as bright as Antares. The proper motion of this star is very small for its distance, meaning it is traveling nearly directly in our line of sight; compare for example with Arcturus.

In a time interval of ±10 million years from the present, Gliese 710 is the star whose combination of mass and close approach distance will cause the greatest gravitational perturbation of our solar system. Specifically, it has the potential to perturb the Oort cloud enough to send a shower of comets into the inner solar system, possibly causing an impact event. However, recent dynamic models by García-Sánchez, et al. indicate that the net increase in cratering rate due to the passage of Gliese 710 will be no more than 5%. They estimate that the closest approach will happen in 1,360,000 years when the star will approach within 0.337 ± 0.177 pc (1.1 ly) of the Sun.

The star with the second greatest perturbational effect in the past or future 10 million years was Algol, a triple star system that passed no closer than 9.8 light years, 7.3 million years ago, but with a considerably larger total mass of 5.8 solar masses. Algol (also known as the Demon Star) was traditionally considered the unluckiest star in the sky, which is reflected in its name (Al-ghol means 'the ghoul' in Arabic)>>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algol wrote:
<<Algol is 92.8 light years from Earth; however, about 7.3 million years ago it passed within 9.8 light years and its apparent magnitude was approximately −2.5, considerably brighter than Sirius is today. Because the total mass of the system is 5.8 solar masses, and despite the fairly large distance at closest approach, this may have been enough to perturb the solar system's Oort cloud slightly and to increase the number of comets entering the inner solar system. However, the actual increase in net cratering rate is believed to have been quite small.>>
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
owlice
Guardian of the Codes
Posts: 8347
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2004 4:18 pm
Location: Washington, DC

Re: TR: Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System

Post by owlice » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:16 am

:: starts packing her bags ::
A closed mouth gathers no foot.

makc
Commodore
Posts: 2019
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2004 5:25 pm

Re: TR: Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System

Post by makc » Tue Apr 13, 2010 7:52 am

owlice wrote:her bags
oh yeah. too bad I cant catch each and every post.

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15428
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: Orange ja glad 'a Gliese 710

Post by neufer » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:04 pm

neufer wrote:
Fri Mar 12, 2010 11:41 pm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_710 wrote: <<Gliese 710 is an orange dwarf star (K7 spectral class) in the constellation Serpens Cauda, with visual magnitude 9.66 and a mass of 0.4–0.6 solar masses. It is about 63.0 light years from Earth, but is notable because its proper motion, distance, and radial velocity indicate that it will approach within 1.1 light years (70,000 AU) from Earth within 1.4 million years, based on the latest Hipparcos data. At closest approach it will be a first-magnitude star about as bright as Antares. The proper motion of this star is very small for its distance, meaning it is traveling nearly directly in our line of sight; compare for example with Arcturus.

In a time interval of ±10 million years from the present, Gliese 710 is the star whose combination of mass and close approach distance will cause the greatest gravitational perturbation of our solar system. Specifically, it has the potential to perturb the Oort cloud enough to send a shower of comets into the inner solar system, possibly causing an impact event. However, recent dynamic models by García-Sánchez, et al. indicate that the net increase in cratering rate due to the passage of Gliese 710 will be no more than 5%. They estimate that the closest approach will happen in 1,360,000 years when the star will approach within 0.337 ± 0.177 pc (1.1 ly) of the Sun.>>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_710 wrote:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
<<Gliese 710 or HIP 89825 is a orange 0.6 M star in the constellation Serpens Cauda whose main popular interest is its future significant close encounter with the Sun. According to Filip Berski and Piotr Dybczyński, this event will be "the strongest disrupting encounter in the future and history of the solar system". Earlier dynamic models indicated that the net increase in cratering rate due to the passage of Gliese 710 would be no more than 5%. They had originally estimated that the closest approach would happen in 1,360,000 years when the star will approach within 0.337 ± 0.177 parsecs of the Sun. Gaia DR2 now finds the minimum perihelion distance is 0.0676±0.0157 parsecs or 13900±3200 AU about 1.281 million years from now: being about 20 times closer than the current distance of Proxima Centauri. It will then reach a similar brightness to the brightest planets, perhaps reaching an apparent visual magnitude of about −2.7 (brighter than Mars at opposition). Maximum total proper motion will peak around one arc minute per year, whose apparent motion will be readily noticeable over a human lifespan.

Gliese 710 currently is 63.8 light-years (19.6 parsecs) from Earth in the constellation Serpens and has a below naked-eye visual magnitude of 9.69. Stellar classification of K7 Vk, which means it is a small main sequence star mostly generating energy through the thermonuclear fusion of hydrogen at its core. (The suffix 'k' indicates that the spectrum shows absorption lines from interstellar matter.) Stellar mass is about 60% of the Sun's mass with an estimated 67% of the Sun's radius. It is suspected to be a variable star that may vary in magnitude from 9.65–9.69. As of 2017, no planets have been detected orbiting this star.

Gliese 710 has the potential to perturb the hypothetical Oort cloud in the outer Solar System, exerting enough force to send showers of comets into the inner Solar System for millions of years, triggering visibility of about ten naked-eye comets per year, and possibly causing an impact event. There is even a 1/10,000 chance of the star penetrating into the region (d < 1,000 AU) where the influence of the passing star on Kuiper belt objects is significant.>>
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
Nitpicker
Inverse Square
Posts: 2528
Joined: Fri Sep 20, 2013 2:39 am
Location: S27 E153

Re: TR: Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System

Post by Nitpicker » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:19 pm

I am determined to ride this one out.

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 9122
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: TR: Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System

Post by Ann » Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:11 pm

In a time interval of ±10 million years from the present, Gliese 710 is the star whose combination of mass and close approach distance will cause the greatest gravitational perturbation of our solar system.
So it may already have happened 10 million years ago?

Why didn't anyone wake me up when it happened?

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15428
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: TR: Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System

Post by neufer » Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:22 pm

Ann wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:11 pm
In a time interval of ±10 million years from the present, Gliese 710 is the star whose combination of mass and close approach distance will cause the greatest gravitational perturbation of our solar system.
So it may already have happened 10 million years ago?

Why didn't anyone wake me up when it happened?
  • Well... you just looked so peaceful.
Art Neuendorffer

BDanielMayfield
Don't bring me down
Posts: 1790
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2012 11:24 am
AKA: Bruce
Location: East Idaho

Re: Orange ja glad 'a Gliese 710

Post by BDanielMayfield » Tue Jun 05, 2018 7:15 pm

neufer wrote:
Fri Mar 12, 2010 11:41 pm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_710 wrote: <<Gliese 710 or HIP 89825 is a orange 0.6 M star in the constellation Serpens Cauda whose main popular interest is its future significant close encounter with the Sun. According to Filip Berski and Piotr Dybczyński, this event will be "the strongest disrupting encounter in the future and history of the solar system". Earlier dynamic models indicated that the net increase in cratering rate due to the passage of Gliese 710 would be no more than 5%. They had originally estimated that the closest approach would happen in 1,360,000 years when the star will approach within 0.337 ± 0.177 parsecs of the Sun. Gaia DR2 now finds the minimum perihelion distance is 0.0676±0.0157 parsecs or 13900±3200 AU about 1.281 million years from now: being about 20 times closer than the current distance of Proxima Centauri. It will then reach a similar brightness to the brightest planets, perhaps reaching an apparent visual magnitude of about −2.7 (brighter than Mars at opposition). Maximum total proper motion will peak around one arc minute per year, whose apparent motion will be readily noticeable over a human lifespan.

Gliese 710 currently is 63.8 light-years (19.6 parsecs) from Earth in the constellation Serpens and has a below naked-eye visual magnitude of 9.69. Stellar classification of K7 Vk, which means it is a small main sequence star mostly generating energy through the thermonuclear fusion of hydrogen at its core. (The suffix 'k' indicates that the spectrum shows absorption lines from interstellar matter.) Stellar mass is about 60% of the Sun's mass with an estimated 67% of the Sun's radius. It is suspected to be a variable star that may vary in magnitude from 9.65–9.69. As of 2017, no planets have been detected orbiting this star.

Gliese 710 has the potential to perturb the hypothetical Oort cloud in the outer Solar System, exerting enough force to send showers of comets into the inner Solar System for millions of years, triggering visibility of about ten naked-eye comets per year, and possibly causing an impact event. There is even a 1/10,000 chance of the star penetrating into the region (d < 1,000 AU) where the influence of the passing star on Kuiper belt objects is significant.>>
Nitpicker wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:19 pm
I am determined to ride this one out.
Me too.

Actually, this goes to show how safe our planet is from stellar incursions. The vast distances between star systems,
Martha Stuart wrote:It's a good thing!
"Happy are the peaceable ... "

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15428
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: Orange ja glad 'a Gliese 710

Post by neufer » Tue Jun 05, 2018 9:13 pm

BDanielMayfield wrote:
Tue Jun 05, 2018 7:15 pm
Nitpicker wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:19 pm

I am determined to ride this one out.
Me too.

Actually, this goes to show how safe our planet is from stellar incursions. The vast distances between star systems,
Martha Stuart wrote:
It's a good thing!
I, personally, would feel a lot safer if we had one of those Space Forces.
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
rstevenson
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
Posts: 2553
Joined: Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:24 pm
Location: Dartmouth, NS, Canada

Re: TR: Orange Dwarf Star Set to Smash into The Solar System

Post by rstevenson » Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:16 pm

I'll make a note of the date in my iPhone, with a reminder set to alert me at, say, 10,000 years in advance. By then I ought to co-exist with the device, so I'll be sure to get the wake-up call.

Rob