ESA: Rosetta: Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

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ESA: Rosetta: Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

Postby bystander » Fri Oct 11, 2013 7:03 pm

Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up
ESA Space Science | Rosetta | 2013 Oct 11

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Rosetta's twelve-year journey in space (Credit: ESA)
Image
Rosetta mission 2014-2015 milestones (Credit: ESA/AOES Medialab)
Image
Rosetta’s Philae lander on comet nucleus (Credit: ESA/AOES Medialab)
ESA’s comet-chasing mission Rosetta will wake up in 100 days’ time from deep-space hibernation to reach the destination it has been cruising towards for a decade.

Comets are the primitive building blocks of the Solar System and the likely source of much of Earth’s water, perhaps even delivering to Earth the ingredients that helped life evolve.

By studying the nature of a comet close up with an orbiter and lander, Rosetta will show us more about the role of comets in the evolution of the Solar System.

Rosetta was launched on 2 March 2004, and through a complex series of flybys – three times past Earth and once past Mars – set course to its destination: comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. It also flew by and imaged two asteroids, Steins on 5 September 2008 and Lutetia on 10 July 2010.

In July 2011 Rosetta was put into deep-space hibernation for the coldest, most distant leg of the journey as it travelled some 800 million kilometres from the Sun, close to the orbit of Jupiter. The spacecraft was oriented so that its solar wings faced the Sun to receive as much sunlight as possible, and it was placed into a slow spin to maintain stability.

Now, as both the comet and the spacecraft are on the return journey back into the inner Solar System, the Rosetta team is preparing for the spacecraft to wake up.

Rosetta’s internal alarm clock is set for 10:00 GMT on 20 January 2014.

Once it wakes up, Rosetta will first warm up its navigation instruments and then it must stop spinning to point its main antenna at Earth, to let the ground team know it is still alive.

“We don’t know exactly at what time Rosetta will make first contact with Earth, but we don’t expect it to be before about 17:45 GMT on the same day,” says Fred Jansen, ESA’s Rosetta mission manager.

“We are very excited to have this important milestone in sight, but we will be anxious to assess the health of the spacecraft after Rosetta has spent nearly 10 years in space.”

After wake-up, Rosetta will still be about 9 million km from the comet. As it moves closer, the 11 instruments on the orbiter and 10 on the lander will be turned on and checked.

In early May, Rosetta will be 2 million km from its target, and towards the end of May it will execute a major manoeuvre to line up for rendezvous with the comet in August.

The first images of a distant 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko are expected in May, which will dramatically improve calculations of the comet’s position and orbit.

Closer in, Rosetta will take thousands of images that will provide further details of the comet’s major landmarks, its rotation speed and spin axis orientation.

Rosetta will also make important measurements of the comet’s gravity, mass and shape, and will make an initial assessment of its gaseous, dust-laden atmosphere, or coma.

Rosetta will also probe the plasma environment and analyse how it interacts with the Sun’s outer atmosphere, the solar wind.

After extensive mapping of the comet’s surface during August and September, a landing site for the 100 kg Philae probe will be chosen. It will be the first time that landing on a comet has ever been attempted.

Given the almost negligible gravity of the comet’s 4 km-wide nucleus, Philae will ‘dock’ with it using ice screws and harpoons to stop it from rebounding back into space.

Philae will send back a panorama of its surroundings and very high-resolution pictures of the surface and will perform on-the-spot analysis of the composition of the ices and organic material. A drill will take samples from 20–30 cm below the surface, feeding them to the onboard laboratory for analysis.

“The focus of the mission then moves towards what we call the ‘escort’ phase, whereby Rosetta will stay alongside the comet as it moves closer to the Sun,” notes Fred.

The comet will reach its closest distance to the Sun on 13 August 2015 at about 185 million km, roughly between the orbits of Earth and Mars.

As the comet hurtles through the inner Solar System at around 100 000 km/h, the relative speed between orbiter and comet will remain equivalent to walking pace. During this ‘escort’ phase the orbiter will continue to analyse dust and gas samples while monitoring the ever-changing conditions on the surface as the comet warms up and its ices sublimate.

“This unique science period will reveal the dynamic evolution of the nucleus as never seen before, allowing us to build up a thorough description of all aspects of the comet, its local environment and revealing how it changes even on a daily basis,” says Matt Taylor, ESA’s Rosetta project scientist.

Rosetta will follow the comet throughout the remainder of 2015, as it heads away from the Sun and activity begins to subside.

“For the first time we will be able to analyse a comet over an extended period of time – it is not just a flyby. This will give us a unique insight into how a comet ‘works’ and ultimately help us to decipher the role of comets in the formation of the Solar System,” adds Matt.
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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby Beyond » Fri Oct 11, 2013 7:19 pm

IF it comes off without a 'hitch', it surpasses greatly, the word astounding!
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby neufer » Tue Dec 10, 2013 4:24 pm

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/eur ... story.html wrote:
European probe on course for comet rendezvous
By Associated Press,

<<BERLIN — When Europe’s Rosetta probe gets roused from its deep space slumber next month, scientists are hoping it will wake up fit and ready for the final stage of its daring mission to land a spacecraft on a comet. There is little room for mistakes as the coming months involve a high-speed chase, a delicate dance around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and finally the precision drop of a lander onto its icy surface — set for Nov. 11. “Imagine trying to parachute onto the tip of a mountain,” said Paolo Ferri, head of mission operations at the European Space Agency. The effort is different from NASA’s Deep Impact probe that fired a projectile into comet Tempel in 2005, hurling a plume of matter into space for scientists to study. That mission was more of a sniper shot compared to the extended rendezvous the European Space Agency is planning for its spacecraft.

Launched in 2004, Rosetta has already spent almost 10 years in space preparing for its big day. The probe had to conduct three fly-bys of Earth and one of Mars, taking advantage of the planets’ gravity to accelerate sufficiently to intercept comet 67P as it orbits the sun at speeds of up to 100,000 kph. The spacecraft has been in hibernation for more than two years now to conserve energy. ESA has been using the time to solve two glitches that could jeopardize the mission: a problem with two of the four ‘reaction wheels’ used to turn the spacecraft, and a small leak of helium that could affect the thrusters which are vital for its final maneuvers. “This is making our life more difficult,” Ferri acknowledges. But engineers have found workarounds. The wakeup call for Rosetta is due to happen at 1000 GMT (5 a.m. EST) on Jan. 20. If all goes according to plan, the probe’s instruments will slowly switch themselves back on, though scientists will have a tense few hours of waiting before they can be sure the spacecraft is in full working order.

The following months will involve a gradual approach of 67P, as Rosetta gently slows down and eventually draws up alongside the comet in what Ferri likened to two planes flying in formation. This will give the mission team time to take plenty of pictures of the comet, which is about four kilometers in diameter, and identify a good landing site. At the moment scientists are divided over whether to pick a site close to the comet’s three active regions — where matter appears to be released into space — or to stay away from them to prevent dust from harming the lander’s sensitive instruments. The lander — called Philae — will drop onto the surface of 67P and latch on using a harpoon, to prevent it from drifting off into space due to the comet’s weak gravity. Using drills, it will dig up samples and analyze them using on-board instruments.

Researchers hope to gain fascinating insights from the results, because comets have remained largely unchanged since the beginning of the universe. “This time capsule’s been locked away for 4.6 billion years,” said ESA’s director of science Mark McCaughrean. One key question scientists hope the mission can help answer is whether comets are responsible for the water on Earth, he said.>>
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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue Dec 10, 2013 6:44 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.


I noticed that the video link in the originating post no longer works, so here is another link.
M
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue Dec 10, 2013 7:33 pm

Rosetta was modeled by ESA scientist using Lego bricks

Click to play embedded YouTube video.



Click to play embedded YouTube video.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Waking up on the 20th of January!

Postby MargaritaMc » Sat Jan 18, 2014 10:52 am

JPL/NASA: To Chase a Comet

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/m/news/news.php?release=2014-015


January 17, 2014

Comets are among the most beautiful and least understood nomads of the night sky. To date, half a dozen of these most heavenly of heavenly bodies have been visited by spacecraft in an attempt to unlock their secrets. All these missions have had one thing in common: the high-speed flyby. Like two ships passing in the night (or one ship and one icy dirtball), they screamed past each other at hyper velocity -- providing valuable insight, but fleeting glimpses, into the life of a comet. That is, until Rosetta.

NASA is participating in the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission, whose goal is to observe one such space-bound icy dirt ball from up close -- for months on end. The spacecraft, festooned with 25 instruments between its lander and orbiter (including three from NASA), is programmed to "wake up" from hibernation on Jan. 20. After a check-out period, it will monitor comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it makes its nosedive into, and then climb out of, the inner solar system. Over 16 months, during which old 67P is expected to transform from a small, frozen world into a roiling mass of ice and dust, complete with surface eruptions, mini-earthquakes, basketball-sized, fluffy ice particles and spewing jets of carbon dioxide and cyanide.

"We are going to be in the cometary catbird seat on this one," said Claudia Alexander, project scientist for U.S. Rosetta from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "To have an extended presence in the neighborhood of a comet as it goes through so many changes should change our perspective on what it is to be a comet."

Since work began on Rosetta back in 1993, scientists and engineers from all over Europe and the United States have been combining their talents to build an orbiter and a lander for this unique expedition. NASA's contribution includes three of the orbiter's instruments (an ultraviolet spectrometer called Alice; the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter; and the Ion and Electron Sensor. NASA is also providing part of the electronics package for an instrument called the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer, which is part of the Swiss-built Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis instrument. NASA is also providing U.S. science investigators for selected non-U.S. instruments and is involved to a greater or lesser degree in seven of the mission's 25 instruments. NASA's Deep Space Network provides support for ESA's Ground Station Network for spacecraft tracking and navigation.

"All the instruments aboard Rosetta and the Philae lander are designed to work synergistically," said Sam Gulkis of JPL, the principal investigator for the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter. "They will all work together to create the most complete picture of a comet to date, telling us how the comet works, what it is made of, and what it can tell us about the origins of the solar system."

The three NASA-supplied instruments are part of the orbiter's scientific payload.
• Rosetta's Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter specializes in the thermal properties. The instrument combines a spectrometer and radiometer, so it can sense temperature and identify chemicals located on or near the comet's surface, and even in the dust and ices jetting out from it. The instrument will also see the gaseous activity through the dusty cloud of material. Rosetta scientists will use it to determine how different materials in the comet change from ice to gas, and to observe how much it changes in temperature as it approaches the sun.

• Like the Microwave for Rosetta Orbiter, the Alice instrument contains a spectrometer. But Alice looks at the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. Alice will analyze gases in the coma and tail and measure the comet's production rates of water and carbon monoxide and dioxide. It will provide information on the surface composition of the nucleus, and make a potentially key measurement of argon, which will be a big clue about what the temperature was in the primordial solar system when the comet's nucleus originally formed (more than 4.6 billion years ago).

• The Rosetta orbiter's Ion and Electron Sensor is part of a suite of five instruments to characterize the plasma environment of the comet -- in particular, its coma, which develops when the comet approaches the sun. The sun's outer atmosphere, the solar wind, interacts with the gas flowing out from the comet, and the instrument will measure the charged particles it comes in contact with as the orbiter approaches the comet's nucleus.

All three instruments are slated to begin science collection by early summer. Along with the pure science they will provide, their data are expected to help Rosetta project management determine where to attempt to land their Philae lander on the comet in November.

"It feels good to be part of a team that is on the cusp of making some space exploration history," said Art Chmielewski, NASA's project manager for US Rosetta, based at JPL. "There are so many exciting elements and big milestones coming up in this mission that it feels like I should buy a ticket and a big box of popcorn. Rosetta is going to be a remarkable ride."

Rosetta is a mission of the European Space Agency, Paris, with contributions from its member states and NASA. Rosetta's Philae lander is provided by a consortium led by the German Aerospace Center, the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, the French National Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL manages the U.S. contribution of the Rosetta mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter was built at JPL and JPL is home to its principal investigator, Samuel Gulkis. The Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, developed the Rosetta orbiter's Ion and Electron Sensor (IES) and is home to its principal investigator, James Burch. The Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colo., developed the Alice instrument and is home to its principal investigator, Alan Stern.

More information about Rosetta is available online at:
http://www.esa.int/rosetta and http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov



M
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby neufer » Sun Jan 19, 2014 5:37 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Mon Jan 20, 2014 11:05 am

There is a live stream at this ESA site:

http://www.livestream.com/eurospaceagency
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby neufer » Mon Jan 20, 2014 8:41 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Mon Jan 20, 2014 9:32 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.

The background story in the video ... Now..

Bear hugs – and relief
http://www.theguardian.com/science/across-the-universe/2014/jan/20/rosetta-comet-chasing-spacecraft-wakes-up-esa-live-blog
There was a moment of silence, then the place erupted with a deafening cheer. Almost two hundred journalists, scientists and engineers were throwing their arms in the air, bear-hugging their nearest neighbours whether they knew them or not.
ESA’s billion-Euro comet chaser Rosetta has woken up after 31 months in hibernation, and spoken to Earth. The signal appeared on a computer screen as a tremulous green spike but it meant the world – maybe even the solar system.
“Now it’s up to us to do the work we’ve promised to do,” said an emotional Matt Taylor, ESA’s project scientist for the mission, to the assembled crowd.
Just 10 minutes before he’d been facing an uncertain future career. If the spacecraft had not woken up, there would be no science to do and the role of project scientist would be redundant. If the signal had come in on time in would have been great. The fact that it came in half an hour late, only made it sweeter in the end.
Although you would not have known at the time. Taylor hid his nerves well, even joking about the wait on Twitter but when the clock passed 19:00CET, making the signal at least 15 minutes late. Then things began to change. People started rocking on their heels, clutching their arms around themselves, and the banter that had helped pass the time so far dried up. Taylor himself sat down, and seemed to withdraw. Then suddenly, everything was good again.
“I told you it would work,” he says to me with a grin to acknowledge his previous nerves.


There is a great photo of the spontaneous cheers that erupted at ESA, posted on their
Facebook page but I can't hotlink it.

Here is the ESA video page, which has more of the video from which neufer gave a clip.
http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos

Margarita
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby neufer » Tue Jan 21, 2014 3:25 am

MargaritaMc wrote:
http://www.theguardian.com/science/acro ... -live-blog wrote:Bear hugs – and relief

[Matt Taylor, ESA’s project scientist] had been facing an uncertain future career. If the spacecraft had not woken up, there would be no science to do and the role of project scientist would be redundant. If the signal had come in on time in would have been great. The fact that it came in half an hour late, only made it sweeter in the end.

Although you would not have known at the time. Taylor hid his nerves well, even joking about the wait on Twitter but when the clock passed 19:00CET, making the signal at least 15 minutes late. Then things began to change. People started rocking on their heels, clutching their arms around themselves, and the banter that had helped pass the time so far dried up. Taylor himself sat down, and seemed to withdraw. Then suddenly, everything was good again. “I told you it would work,” he says to me with a grin to acknowledge his previous nerves.
http://www.seinfeldscripts.com/TheHotTub.htm wrote:
    The Hot Tub
Jerry Seinfeld: [Jean-Paul] overslept and missed the whole race. Isn't that amazing?

George: I'll tell you what happened. I bet he got the AM/PM mixed-up.

Jerry: My money's on the snooze. I bet he hit the snooze for an extra 5 and it never came back on.
................................................
Jerry: (pause) So what happened? The snooze alarm, wasn't it?

Jean-Paul: Man, it wasn't the snooze. Most people think it was the snooze, but no, no snooze.

Jerry: AM/PM.

Jean-Paul: Man, it wasn't the AM/PM. It was the volume.

Jerry: Ah...the volume.

Jean-Paul: Yes, the volume. There was a separate knob for the radio alarm.

Jerry: Ah, separate knob.

Jean-Paul: Yes, separate knob. Why separate knob?! Why separate knob?! (frustrated)

Jerry: Some people like to have the radio alarm a little louder than the radio.
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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Fri Jan 24, 2014 9:48 pm

I've been wondering what acronym makes up the name of ALICE, the - NASA provided - miniature UV Imaging Spectrograph that's on board Rosetta.

I was utterly enchanted to read this at http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/us-instruments/alice-overview
ALICE will help us determine where comet C-G came from, what it is made of, and how its nucleus, coma, and tails interact. (Unlike the names of other U.S. instruments, “ ALICE” is not an acronym; it is simply a name that the instrument’s principal investigator, Alan Stern, likes).


Margarita

PS
Rosetta will need little explanation, but I was puzzled about Philae

The probe is named after the Rosetta Stone, as it is hoped the mission will help form an idea of how the Solar System looked before planets formed. The lander is named after the Nile island Philae where an obelisk was found that helped decipher the Rosetta Stone.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby neufer » Fri Jan 24, 2014 10:35 pm

MargaritaMc wrote:
Rosetta will need little explanation, but I was puzzled about Philae

The probe is named after the Rosetta Stone, as it is hoped the mission will help form an idea of how the Solar System looked before planets formed. The lander is named after the Nile island Philae where an obelisk was found that helped decipher the Rosetta Stone.

They couldn't have named a instrument "The Great Belzoni" :?:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Belzoni wrote:
<<Giovanni Battista Belzoni (5 November 1778 – 3 December 1823), sometimes known as The Great Belzoni, was a prolific Italian explorer and pioneer archaeologist of Egyptian antiquities.

Belzoni was born in Padua. His father was a barber who sired fourteen children. His family was from Rome and when Belzoni was 16 he went to work there, claiming that he "studied hydraulics." He intended taking monastic vows, but in 1798 the occupation of the city by French troops drove him from Rome and changed his proposed career. In 1800 he moved to the Netherlands where he earned a living as a barber.

In 1803 he fled to England to avoid being sent to jail. There he married an Englishwoman, Sarah Bane (1783–1860). Belzoni was a tall man at 6 feet 7 inches (2.01 m) tall and they both joined a travelling circus. They were for some time compelled to find subsistence by performing exhibitions of feats of strength and agility as a strongman at fairs and on the streets of London. In 1804 he appears engaged at the circus at Astley's amphitheatre at a variety of performances. Belzoni had an interest in phantasmagoria and experimented with the use of magic lanterns in his shows.

In 1812 he left England and after a tour of performances in Spain, Portugal and Sicily, he went to Malta in 1815 where he met Ismael Gibraltar, an emissary of Muhammad Ali, who at the time was undertaking a programme of agrarian land reclamation and important irrigation works. Belzoni wanted to show Muhammad Ali a hydraulic machine of his own invention for raising the waters of the Nile. Though the experiment with this engine was successful, the project was not approved by the pasha. Belzoni, now without a job, was resolved to continue his travels. On the recommendation of the orientalist, J. L. Burckhardt, he was sent by Henry Salt, the British consul to Egypt, to the Ramesseum at Thebes, from where he removed with great skill the colossal bust of Ramesses II, commonly called "the Young Memnon". Shipped by Belzoni to England, this piece is still on prominent display at the British Museum. This weighed over 7 tons. It took him 17 days and 130 men to tow it to the river. He used levers to lift it onto rollers. Then he had his men distributed equally with 4 ropes drag it on the rollers. On the first day (27 July) he only covered a few yards, the second he covered 50 yards deliberately breaking the bases of 2 columns to clear the way for his burden. After 150 yards, it sank into the sand, and a detour of 300 yards on firmer ground was necessary. From there, it got a little easier, and, on 12 August, he finally made it to the river where he was able to load it on a boat for shipment to the British Museum in London.

He also expanded his investigations to the great temple of Edfu, visited Elephantine and Philae, cleared the great temple at Abu Simbel of sand (1817), made excavations at Karnak, and opened up the sepulchre of Seti I (still sometimes known as "Belzoni's Tomb"). He was the first to penetrate into the second pyramid of Giza, and the first European in modern times to visit the oasis of Bahariya. He also identified the ruins of Berenice on the Red Sea.

During the 1820s William John Bankes acquired the obelisk found at Philae and had Giovanni Belzoni transport it to his estate at Kingston Lacy in Dorset, England where it can still be seen in the gardens.

In 1823 Belzoni set out for West Africa, intending to travel to Timbuktu. Having been refused permission to pass through Morocco, he chose the Guinea Coast route. He reached the Kingdom of Benin, but was seized with dysentery at a village called Gwato, and died there. According to the celebrated traveller Richard Francis Burton he was murdered and robbed. In 1829 his widow published his drawings of the royal tombs at Thebes.>>
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ROSETTA SETS SIGHTS ON DESTINATION COMET

Postby MargaritaMc » Fri Mar 28, 2014 8:18 am

ESA: ROSETTA SETS SIGHTS ON DESTINATION COMET


Wide angle view of comet: narrow angle image area (below) is marked by the square


Narrow-angle view of comet 67P/CG taken on 21 March.
Credits: ESA © 2014 MPS for OSIRIS-Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA.

(Margarita's note: In the constellation Orphiuchus. The globular star cluster is M107)
*


27 March 2014
ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft has caught a first glimpse of its destination comet since waking up from deep-space hibernation on 20 January.

These two ‘first light’ images were taken on 20 and 21 March by the OSIRIS wide-angle camera and narrow-angle camera, as part of six weeks of activities dedicated to preparing the spacecraft’s science instruments for close-up study of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.
...

Rosetta is currently around 5 million kilometres from the comet, and at this distance it is still too far away to resolve – its light is seen in less than a pixel and required a series of 60–300 second exposures taken with the wide-angle and narrow-angle camera. The data then travelled 37 minutes through space to reach Earth, with the download taking about an hour per image.
...
Between May and August the 4 km-wide comet will gradually ‘grow’ in Rosetta’s field of view from appearing to have a diameter of less than one camera pixel to well over 2000 pixels – equivalent to a resolution of around 2 m per pixel – allowing the first surface features to be resolved.

More info at the ESA website:
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Rosetta_sets_sights_on_destination_comet


Margarita

*
This info is from the Rosetta blog post of 27 March, 2014
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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ROSETTA SETS SIGHTS ON DESTINATION COMET

Postby MargaritaMc » Fri Mar 28, 2014 8:18 am

ESA: ROSETTA SETS SIGHTS ON DESTINATION COMET


Wide angle view of comet: narrow angle image area (below) is marked by the square


Narrow-angle view of comet 67P/CG taken on 21 March.
Credits: ESA © 2014 MPS for OSIRIS-Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA.

(Margarita's note: In the constellation Orphiuchus. The globular star cluster is M107)
*


27 March 2014
ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft has caught a first glimpse of its destination comet since waking up from deep-space hibernation on 20 January.

These two ‘first light’ images were taken on 20 and 21 March by the OSIRIS wide-angle camera and narrow-angle camera, as part of six weeks of activities dedicated to preparing the spacecraft’s science instruments for close-up study of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.
...

Rosetta is currently around 5 million kilometres from the comet, and at this distance it is still too far away to resolve – its light is seen in less than a pixel and required a series of 60–300 second exposures taken with the wide-angle and narrow-angle camera. The data then travelled 37 minutes through space to reach Earth, with the download taking about an hour per image.
...
Between May and August the 4 km-wide comet will gradually ‘grow’ in Rosetta’s field of view from appearing to have a diameter of less than one camera pixel to well over 2000 pixels – equivalent to a resolution of around 2 m per pixel – allowing the first surface features to be resolved.

More info at the ESA website:
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Rosetta_sets_sights_on_destination_comet


Margarita

*
This info is from the Rosetta blog post of 27 March, 2014
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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A TWEETER’S GUIDE TO PHILAE’S INSTRUMENTS

Postby MargaritaMc » Wed Apr 30, 2014 10:48 am

"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta Tour around Scandinavia

Postby MargaritaMc » Wed May 14, 2014 8:36 pm

excerpt from the Rosetta tour blog
http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/05/13/rosetta-tour-into-week-2/
ESA's Space Trucker Rosita Suenson shares her experience from the road as the Rosetta Tour heads into week 2 of 4 on its journey around Scandinavia:

Being on the road is a different experience from anything I've done before. Arriving to Oslo last week and seeing the truck for the first time was great! The truck is impressive and I am sure, by its pure look, people get curious trying to find out what this is about.

After a few "cooking your own comet" activities together with Jari and Marianne, I hopped on the truck with driver Kari to continue our journey to Borlänge in Sweden. It was a very long drive, believe me, there is a LOT of forest in Scandinavia!

... We're now in Denmark for a few days, and then back to Sweden. Full Schedule
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby bystander » Thu May 15, 2014 9:21 pm

ESA: Rosetta's Target Comet Is Becoming Active

MPS: Rosetta's Target Comet Is Becoming Active

The comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, target of ESA’s Rosetta mission, has begun to develop a dust coma. This can be seen in a series of images taken by OSIRIS, the spacecraft’s scientific imaging system, between March 27th and May 4th. In the images from the end of April, the dust that the comet is already emitting is clearly visible as an evolving coma and reaches approximately 1300 kilometers into space. Scientists from the OSIRIS team presented these new findings in a meeting at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS).
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Mon May 19, 2014 1:56 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.


Rosetta puts on the brakes

European Space Agency, ESA

Uploaded on 16 May 2014


Rosetta is about to put on the brakes to ensure that it is on target for comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

This video explains the crucial orbit correction manoeuvres that are required to slow down Rosetta's speed, relative to the comet, from 750 metres per second to just one metre per second between 21 May and 5 August. By then, nine thruster burns (including one test burn in early May) will have reduced the distance between them from one million kms to just under 200 kms.

We also see the first images of the comet from the spacecraft's OSIRIS camera (Optical, Spectroscopic and Infrared Remote Imaging System), taken between 24 March and 4 May 2014. As the spacecraft gets closer to the comet, further images will improve the orbital corrections and provide more details about the comet's shape, size and rotation.

"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Mon May 19, 2014 2:20 pm


How the Rosetta Spacecraft Will Land on a Comet (Infographic)
by Karl Tate, Infographics Artist | January 17, 2014
http://www.space.com/24333-rosetta-spacecraft-comet-landing-explained-infographic.html

... Rosetta took a winding path through the solar system, performing slingshot maneuvers past the Earth and Mars to use those planets’ gravity for a speed boost. The probe examined two asteroids – Steins and Lutetia – before closing in on its primary prey, the comet known as 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue Jun 24, 2014 4:43 pm

There will be a Google+ hangout about Rosetta this coming Thursday, 26th June, from 12:30pm to 1:30 pm GMT

https://plus.google.com/app/basic/events/c9al7u9d08ggp1acn492tcjpldc
ESAHangout: How do we journey to a comet?
Join us to talk about Rosetta's journey to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Our host Daniel Scuka will be joined by:
Fred Jansen - Rosetta Mission Manager
Andrea Accomazzo - Rosetta Flight Director
Padma Yanamandra-Fisher - Coordinator of Amateur Observations for 67P/C-G

Send us your questions in the comments - or on Twitter using #AskRosetta

"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:45 pm

FOUR DONE, SIX TO GO: BURNING DOWN TO COMET RENDEZVOUS

It’s burn week in space again, and Wednesday, 2 July, marks the start of a fresh set of four orbit correction manoeuvres (OCMs), referred to as the ‘Far Approach Trajectory’ burns. These will be somewhat smaller than those previous but will be conducted weekly, rather than fortnightly.

First, a quick recap to bring you up to date.

On 7 May, Rosetta began a series of ten OCMs designed to reduce its speed with respect to comet 67P/C-G by about 775 m/s. The first, producing just 20 m/s delta-v (‘change in velocity’), was done as a small test burn, as it was the first use of the spacecraft’s propulsion system after waking from hibernation on 20 January. The system worked fine!
read more at

http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/07/01/four-complete-six-to-go-burning-down-to-comet-rendezvous/


"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:59 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.


Uploaded on 26 Jun 2014

In this ESAHangout experts joined us talk about Rosetta's journey to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Our host Daniel Scuka was joined by:
Fred Jansen - Rosetta Mission Manager
Andrea Accomazzo - Rosetta Flight Director
Padma Yanamandra-Fisher - Coordinator of Amateur Observations for 67P/C-G
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby bystander » Tue Jul 01, 2014 5:25 pm

Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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Re: ESA: Rosetta: 100 days to wake-up

Postby MargaritaMc » Wed Jul 16, 2014 2:59 pm

"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS


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