Cassini's Last Hurrah

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saturno2
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Re: Cassini's Last Hurrah

Postby saturno2 » Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:44 pm

rstevenson wrote:And you, saturno2, are a poet.

Rob


Thanks, Rob.
But, I´m only an amateur of Literature

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Cassini Makes its 'Goodbye Kiss' Flyby of Titan

Postby bystander » Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:53 pm

Cassini Makes its 'Goodbye Kiss' Flyby of Titan
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Cassini | 2017 Sep 11
NASA's Cassini spacecraft is headed toward its Sept. 15 plunge into Saturn, following a final, distant flyby of the planet's giant moon Titan.

The spacecraft made its closest approach to Titan today at 12:04 p.m. PDT (3:04 p.m. EDT), at an altitude of 73,974 miles (119,049 kilometers) above the moon's surface. The spacecraft is scheduled to make contact with Earth on Sept. 12 at about 6:19 p.m. PDT (9:19 p.m. EDT). Images and other science data taken during the encounter are expected to begin streaming to Earth soon after. Navigators will analyze the spacecraft's trajectory following this downlink to confirm that Cassini is precisely on course to dive into Saturn at the planned time, location and altitude.

This distant encounter is referred to informally as "the goodbye kiss" by mission engineers, because it provides a gravitational nudge that sends the spacecraft toward its dramatic ending in Saturn's upper atmosphere. The geometry of the flyby causes Cassini to slow down slightly in its orbit around Saturn. This lowers the altitude of its flight over the planet so that the spacecraft goes too deep into Saturn's atmosphere to survive, because friction with the atmosphere will cause Cassini to burn up. ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: Cassini Makes its 'Goodbye Kiss' Flyby of Titan

Postby neufer » Tue Sep 12, 2017 4:23 pm

bystander wrote:Cassini Makes its 'Goodbye Kiss' Flyby of Titan
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Cassini | 2017 Sep 11
This distant encounter is referred to informally as "the goodbye kiss" by mission engineers, because it provides a gravitational nudge that sends the spacecraft toward its dramatic ending in Saturn's upper atmosphere. The geometry of the flyby causes Cassini to slow down slightly in its orbit around Saturn. This lowers the altitude of its flight over the planet so that the spacecraft goes too deep into Saturn's atmosphere to survive, because friction with the atmosphere will cause Cassini to burn up. ...
Art Neuendorffer

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Cassini Makes Its Final Approach to Saturn

Postby bystander » Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:14 pm

Cassini Makes Its Final Approach to Saturn
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Cassini | 2017 Sep 13

NASA's Cassini spacecraft is on final approach to Saturn, following confirmation by mission navigators that it is on course to dive into the planet’s atmosphere on Friday, Sept. 15.

Cassini is ending its 13-year tour of the Saturn system with an intentional plunge into the planet to ensure Saturn's moons – in particular Enceladus, with its subsurface ocean and signs of hydrothermal activity – remain pristine for future exploration. The spacecraft's fateful dive is the final beat in the mission's Grand Finale, 22 weekly dives, which began in late April, through the gap between Saturn and its rings. No spacecraft has ever ventured so close to the planet before.

The mission’s final calculations predict loss of contact with the Cassini spacecraft will take place on Sept. 15 at 7:55 a.m. EDT (4:55 a.m. PDT). Cassini will enter Saturn's atmosphere approximately one minute earlier, at an altitude of about 1,190 miles (1,915 kilometers) above the planet's estimated cloud tops (the altitude where the air pressure is 1-bar, equivalent to sea level on Earth). During its dive into the atmosphere, the spacecraft's speed will be approximately 70,000 miles (113,000 kilometers) per hour. The final plunge will take place on the day side of Saturn, near local noon, with the spacecraft entering the atmosphere around 10 degrees north latitude. ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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MargaritaMc
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Re: Cassini's Last Hurrah

Postby MargaritaMc » Thu Sep 14, 2017 5:32 pm

In case this is useful
http://m.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_S ... of_mission
HOW TO FOLLOW CASSINI’S END OF MISSION

12 September 2017

The international Cassini mission reaches its dramatic finale this Friday by plunging into Saturn’s atmosphere, concluding 13-years of exploration around the ringed planet.

Here’s when to follow events broadcast by NASA via https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive this week (dates and times below are given in GMT/CEST; all times subject to change).

You can also watch the live stream on this page:
(Note that other broadcasts will play here outside of the below times)

13 Sept
17:00 GMT / 19:00 CEST: News conference with a detailed preview of final mission activities (also streaming at https://www.youtube.com/nasajpl)

14 Sept
20:00-22:00 GMT / 22:00-23:00 CEST: Speaker programme as part of NASA Social event at JPL

15 Sept
~03:00 GMT / ~05:00 CEST: Final images expected to begin appearing online in Cassini raw image gallery
11:00-12:30 GMT / 13:00-14:30 CEST: Live commentary, covering end of mission (loss of signal expected on Earth ~11:55 GMT/13:55 CEST)
13:30 GMT/15:30 CEST: Post-mission news conference
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Case
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E-book offers Top 100 Cassini images

Postby Case » Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:41 am

NASA has released a new e-book highlighting intriguing images and key scientific discoveries from its Cassini mission. "The Saturn System: Through the Eyes of Cassini" reveals the top 100 images from the mission to Saturn that explored the ringed planet and its spectacular moons.

https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/resources/7777/?category=graphics

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Case on Cassini's "Casey" Kasem

Postby neufer » Fri Sep 15, 2017 12:34 pm

Case wrote:
NASA has released a new e-book highlighting intriguing images and key scientific discoveries from its Cassini mission. "The Saturn System: Through the Eyes of Cassini" reveals the top 100 images from the mission to Saturn that explored the ringed planet and its spectacular moons.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casey_Kasem wrote:
:arrow: Kemal Amin "Casey" Kasem (April 27, 1932 – June 15, 2014) was an American disc jockey, music historian, radio personality, voice actor, and actor, known for being the host of several music radio countdown programs, most notably American Top 40, from 1970 until his retirement in 2009, and for providing the voice of Norville "Shaggy" Rogers in the Scooby-Doo franchise from 1969 to 1997, and again from 2002 until 2009.
Art Neuendorffer

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Cassini Ends Its Historic Exploration of Saturn

Postby bystander » Fri Sep 15, 2017 2:57 pm

Cassini Ends Its Historic Exploration of Saturn
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Cassini | 2017 Sep 15

3121_PIA21889_Enceladus_FigA_color.jpg

A thrilling epoch in the exploration of our solar system came to a close today, as NASA's Cassini spacecraft made a fateful plunge into the atmosphere of Saturn, ending its 13-year tour of the ringed planet. ...

Telemetry received during the plunge indicates that, as expected, Cassini entered Saturn’s atmosphere with its thrusters firing to maintain stability, as it sent back a unique final set of science observations. Loss of contact with the Cassini spacecraft occurred at 7:55 a.m. EDT (4:55 a.m. PDT), with the signal received by NASA’s Deep Space Network antenna complex in Canberra, Australia. ...

Cassini's plunge brings to a close a series of 22 weekly "Grand Finale" dives between Saturn and its rings, a feat never before attempted by any spacecraft. ...

As planned, data from eight of Cassini's science instruments was beamed back to Earth. Mission scientists will examine the spacecraft's final observations in the coming weeks for new insights about Saturn, including hints about the planet's formation and evolution, and processes occurring in its atmosphere. ...

While the Cassini spacecraft is gone, its enormous collection of data about Saturn – the giant planet, its magnetosphere, rings and moons – will continue to yield new discoveries for decades to come. ...

Cassini Concludes Pioneering Mission at Saturn
ESA | Space Science | Science & Technology | Cassini-Huygens | 2017 Sep 15
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Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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MargaritaMc
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Re: Cassini's Last Hurrah

Postby MargaritaMc » Fri Sep 15, 2017 5:55 pm

http://www.nature.com/news/cassini-crashes-into-saturn-but-could-still-deliver-big-discoveries-1.22619

And from an email

September 15, 2017


Dear Friends and Colleagues,

After 18 years, here is my final Captain's Log.

http://ciclops.org

Carolyn Porco
Cassini Imaging Team leader
Director, CICLOPS, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO
Visiting Scholar, UC Berkeley, CA
Fellow, California Academy of Sciences

"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS


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