Hubble Observes the Farthest Active Inbound Comet Yet Seen

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Hubble Observes the Farthest Active Inbound Comet Yet Seen

Postby bystander » Thu Sep 28, 2017 7:14 pm

Hubble Observes the Farthest Active Inbound Comet Yet Seen
NASA | STScI | HubbleSite | 2017 Sep 28

The Comet that Came in from the Cold

STSCI-H-p1740a-f-1000x1000.jpg

A solitary frozen traveler has been journeying for millions of years toward the heart of our planetary system. The wayward vagabond, a city-sized snowball of ice and dust called a comet, was gravitationally kicked out of the Oort Cloud, its frigid home at the outskirts of the solar system. This region is a vast comet storehouse, composed of icy leftover building blocks from the construction of the planets 4.6 billion years ago.

The comet is so small, faint, and far away that it eluded detection. Finally, in May 2017, astronomers using the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) in Hawaii spotted the solitary intruder at a whopping 1.5 billion miles away - between the orbits of Saturn and Uranus. The Hubble Space Telescope was enlisted to take close-up views of the comet, called C/2017 K2 PANSTARRS (K2).

The comet is record-breaking because it is already becoming active under the feeble glow of the distant Sun. Astronomers have never seen an active inbound comet this far out, where sunlight is merely 1/225th its brightness as seen from Earth. Temperatures, correspondingly, are at a minus 440 degrees Fahrenheit. Even at such bone-chilling temperatures, a mix of ancient ices on the surface - oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide - is beginning to sublimate and shed as dust. This material balloons into a vast 80,000-mile-wide halo of dust, called a coma, enveloping the solid nucleus.

Astronomers will continue to study K2 as it travels into the inner solar system, making its closest approach to the Sun in 2022.
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Re: Hubble Observes the Farthest Active Inbound Comet Yet Seen

Postby neufer » Fri Sep 29, 2017 2:44 pm

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UCLA: Primitive Comet Observed 1.5 Billion Miles from the Sun

Postby bystander » Fri Oct 06, 2017 3:35 pm

Team Observes Primitive Comet 1.5 Billion Miles from the Sun
University of California, Los Angeles | 2017 Oct 05

A team of astronomers led by UCLA professor David Jewitt has identified a “special comet” 1.5 billion miles from the sun. No other comet heading toward our sun has ever been seen at such a great distance.

Jewitt said the discovery will enable scientists to monitor the developing activity of a comet over an extraordinary range of distances.

C/2017 K2 (PANSTARRS), or K2 for short, is currently beyond Saturn’s orbit, and it has been traveling for millions of years from its home in the frigid outer reaches of the solar system, where the temperature is approximately 440 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. It was photographed by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, and the researchers’ observations were reported in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

K2’s orbit indicates it came from the Oort Cloud, a very large spherical region thought to contain hundreds of billions of comets. ...

The comet will make its closest approach to the sun in 2022, when it will pass just beyond Mars’ orbit.

A Comet Active Beyond the Crystallization Zone - David Jewitt et al
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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