LBNL: A New Filter to Better Map the Dark Universe

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LBNL: A New Filter to Better Map the Dark Universe

Post by bystander » Wed May 08, 2019 7:25 pm

A New Filter to Better Map the Dark Universe
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | 2019 May 08

New method developed by Berkeley Lab researchers cuts through galaxies’ messy emissions, provides clearer window into dark matter, dark energy

CMB-map-lensing-illustration-crop-sm.jpg
Just as a wine glass distorts an image showing temperature fluctuations in the
cosmic microwave background in this photo illustration, large objects like galaxy
clusters and galaxies can similarly distort this light to produce lensing effects.
(Credit: Emmanuel Schaan and Simone Ferraro/Berkeley Lab)

The earliest known light in our universe, known as the cosmic microwave background, was emitted about 380,000 years after the Big Bang. The patterning of this relic light holds many important clues to the development and distribution of large-scale structures such as galaxies and galaxy clusters.

Distortions in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), caused by a phenomenon known as lensing, can further illuminate the structure of the universe and can even tell us things about the mysterious, unseen universe – including dark energy, which makes up about 68 percent of the universe and accounts for its accelerating expansion, and dark matter, which accounts for about 27 percent of the universe.

Set a stemmed wine glass on a surface, and you can see how lensing effects can simultaneously magnify, squeeze, and stretch the view of the surface beneath it. In lensing of the CMB, gravity effects from large objects like galaxies and galaxy clusters bend the CMB light in different ways. These lensing effects can be subtle (known as weak lensing) for distant and small galaxies, and computer programs can identify them because they disrupt the regular CMB patterning.

There are some known issues with the accuracy of lensing measurements, though, and particularly with temperature-based measurements of the CMB and associated lensing effects. While lensing can be a powerful tool for studying the invisible universe, and could even potentially help us sort out the properties of ghostly subatomic particles like neutrinos, the universe is an inherently messy place. ...

Foreground-Immune Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing with Shear-Only Reconstruction ~ Emmanuel Schaan, Simone Ferraro
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