LIGO-Virgo Network Catches Another Neutron Star Collision

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bystander
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LIGO-Virgo Network Catches Another Neutron Star Collision

Post by bystander » Tue Jan 07, 2020 6:16 pm

LIGO-Virgo Network Catches Another Neutron Star Collision
LIGO | California Institute of Technology | 2020 Jan 06
On April 25, 2019, the LIGO Livingston Observatory picked up what appeared to be gravitational ripples from a collision of two neutron stars. LIGO Livingston is part of a gravitational-wave network that includes LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory), funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the European Virgo detector. Now, a new study confirms that this event was indeed likely the result of a merger of two neutron stars. This would be only the second time this type of event has ever been observed in gravitational waves.

The first such observation, which took place in August of 2017, made history for being the first time that both gravitational waves and light were detected from the same cosmic event. The April 25 merger, by contrast, did not result in any light being detected. However, through an analysis of the gravitational-wave data alone, researchers have learned that the collision produced an object with an unusually high mass. ...

The April 2019 event was first identified in data from the LIGO Livingston detector alone. The LIGO Hanford detector was temporarily offline at the time, and, at a distance of more than 500 million light-years, the event was too faint to be visible in Virgo's data. Using the Livingston data, combined with information derived from Virgo’s data, the team narrowed the location of the event to a patch of sky more than 8,200 square degrees in size, or about 20 percent of the sky. For comparison, the August 2017 event was narrowed to a region of just 16 square degrees, or 0.04 percent of the sky. ...

GW190425: Observation of a Compact Binary Coalescence with Total Mass ∼3.4 M
  • LIGO Scientific Collaboration, VIRGO Collaboration

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Ann
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Re: LIGO-Virgo Network Catches Another Neutron Star Collision

Post by Ann » Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:39 pm

bystander wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 6:16 pm
LIGO-Virgo Network Catches Another Neutron Star Collision
LIGO | California Institute of Technology | 2020 Jan 06
On April 25, 2019, the LIGO Livingston Observatory picked up what appeared to be gravitational ripples from a collision of two neutron stars. LIGO Livingston is part of a gravitational-wave network that includes LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory), funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the European Virgo detector. Now, a new study confirms that this event was indeed likely the result of a merger of two neutron stars. This would be only the second time this type of event has ever been observed in gravitational waves.

The first such observation, which took place in August of 2017, made history for being the first time that both gravitational waves and light were detected from the same cosmic event. The April 25 merger, by contrast, did not result in any light being detected. However, through an analysis of the gravitational-wave data alone, researchers have learned that the collision produced an object with an unusually high mass. ...

The April 2019 event was first identified in data from the LIGO Livingston detector alone. The LIGO Hanford detector was temporarily offline at the time, and, at a distance of more than 500 million light-years, the event was too faint to be visible in Virgo's data. Using the Livingston data, combined with information derived from Virgo’s data, the team narrowed the location of the event to a patch of sky more than 8,200 square degrees in size, or about 20 percent of the sky. For comparison, the August 2017 event was narrowed to a region of just 16 square degrees, or 0.04 percent of the sky. ...

GW190425: Observation of a Compact Binary Coalescence with Total Mass ∼3.4 M
  • LIGO Scientific Collaboration, VIRGO Collaboration

viewtopic.php?t=39611
viewtopic.php?t=39395
Don't have much to say about the colliding neutron stars, but have you noticed that at this moment, as I'm writing this, bystander has 19191 posts?

Soon he will have 20,000 posts. What a mainstay and champion of Starship Asterisk* he is! But I like the number 19191.

Ann
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neufer
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Re: LIGO-Virgo Network Catches Another Neutron Star Collision

Post by neufer » Wed Jan 08, 2020 6:16 pm

Ann wrote:
Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:39 pm

as I'm writing this, bystander has 19191 posts?

Soon he will have 20,000 posts. What a mainstay and champion of Starship Asterisk* he is! But I like the number 19191.
19191 = 3 x 6397
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap030808.html wrote:
Blue Stragglers in NGC 6397

Explanation: In our neck of the Internet posters are too far apart to be in danger of colliding. Starship Asterisk*'s massive posters have long since evolved off the main sequence, exhausting their central supplies of intellectual fuel. This should leave the Asterisk* with only old low mass posters; faint red main sequence posters and brighter blue and red giants. However, spectroscopic data show that the indicated posters, descriptively dubbed blue stragglers, are clearly main sequence posters which are too blue and too massive to still be there. Suggestively the stragglers appear to be two and occasionally three times as massive as the lower mass cluster posters otherwise present, supporting evidence for their formation from two and even three poster collisions.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_code_405 wrote:

<<Area code 405 serves the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It covers the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area including cities such as Oklahoma City, Edmond, El Reno, Norman, Stillwater, Shawnee, Chickasha, Tuttle, Moore, and Guthrie. Area code 405 was one of the original area codes put into service in 1947 by telecom giant AT&T. Until January 1, 1953, it covered the entire state of Oklahoma. Even though central Oklahoma was home to the great majority of 405's landlines and cell phones, this configuration remained unchanged for 44 years. On November 1, 1997, 405 was reduced to cover only central Oklahoma, while the southern and western portions of the old 405 became area code 580. As a result, 405 is the only area code in the state that does not reach the state's borders with Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas.>>
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap020220.html wrote:
Oddities of Star Cluster NGC 6397

Explanation: One of these posters is winking. This poster, a member of Starship Asterisk*, is noteworthy not just because he winks, but because he winks so fast and because his companion poster is so atypical. Speculation holds that this might be a neutron poster spun up to a rate of 274 rotations each second by the bloated red poster it orbits. Matter gravitationally pulled from the bloated poster likely orbits the millisecond pulsar, making him spin faster when he crashes onto the surface. The odd system might have resulted when the neutron poster captured a normal poster after a near collision near Starship Asterisk*'s dense center. Other collisions near the center of Starship Asterisk* are thought to have produced other oddities -- blue straggler posters.
Art Neuendorffer

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Ann
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Re: LIGO-Virgo Network Catches Another Neutron Star Collision

Post by Ann » Wed Jan 08, 2020 6:27 pm

neufer wrote:
Wed Jan 08, 2020 6:16 pm
Ann wrote:
Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:39 pm

as I'm writing this, bystander has 19191 posts?

Soon he will have 20,000 posts. What a mainstay and champion of Starship Asterisk* he is! But I like the number 19191.
19191 = 3 x 6397
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap030808.html wrote:
Blue Stragglers in NGC 6397

Explanation: In our neck of the Internet posters are too far apart to be in danger of colliding. Starship Asterisk*'s massive posters have long since evolved off the main sequence, exhausting their central supplies of intellectual fuel. This should leave the Asterisk* with only old low mass posters; faint red main sequence posters and brighter blue and red giants. However, spectroscopic data show that the indicated posters, descriptively dubbed blue stragglers, are clearly main sequence posters which are too blue and too massive to still be there. Suggestively the stragglers appear to be two and occasionally three times as massive as the lower mass cluster posters otherwise present, supporting evidence for their formation from two and even three poster collisions.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_code_405 wrote:

<<Area code 405 serves the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It covers the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area including cities such as Oklahoma City, Edmond, El Reno, Norman, Stillwater, Shawnee, Chickasha, Tuttle, Moore, and Guthrie. Area code 405 was one of the original area codes put into service in 1947 by telecom giant AT&T. Until January 1, 1953, it covered the entire state of Oklahoma. Even though central Oklahoma was home to the great majority of 405's landlines and cell phones, this configuration remained unchanged for 44 years. On November 1, 1997, 405 was reduced to cover only central Oklahoma, while the southern and western portions of the old 405 became area code 580. As a result, 405 is the only area code in the state that does not reach the state's borders with Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas.>>
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap020220.html wrote:
Oddities of Star Cluster NGC 6397

Explanation: One of these posters is winking. This poster, a member of Starship Asterisk*, is noteworthy not just because he winks, but because he winks so fast and because his companion poster is so atypical. Speculation holds that this might be a neutron poster spun up to a rate of 274 rotations each second by the bloated red poster it orbits. Matter gravitationally pulled from the bloated poster likely orbits the millisecond pulsar, making him spin faster when he crashes onto the surface. The odd system might have resulted when the neutron poster captured a normal poster after a near collision near Starship Asterisk*'s dense center. Other collisions near the center of Starship Asterisk* are thought to have produced other oddities -- blue straggler posters.
Art, you're killing me!!! :lol2: :lol2: :lol2:

Ann (who is in danger of evolving off the blue straggler main sequence into red territory - noooo!!!!)!
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