CXC: Einstein's Relativity, Critical for GPS, Seen in Distant Stars

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CXC: Einstein's Relativity, Critical for GPS, Seen in Distant Stars

Post by bystander » Thu Oct 22, 2020 8:06 pm

Einstein's Theory of Relativity, Critical for GPS, Seen in Distant Stars
NASA | MSFC | Chandra X-ray Observatory | 2020 Oct 22
What do Albert Einstein, the Global Positioning System (GPS), and a pair of stars 200,000 trillion miles from Earth have in common?

The answer is an effect from Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity called the “gravitational redshift,” where light is shifted to redder colors because of gravity. Using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have discovered the phenomenon in two stars orbiting each other in our galaxy about 29,000 light-years (200,000 trillion miles) away from Earth. While these stars are very distant, gravitational redshifts have tangible impacts on modern life, as scientists and engineers must take them into account to enable accurate positions for GPS.

While scientists have found incontrovertible evidence of gravitational redshifts in our solar system, it has been challenging to observe them in more distant objects across space. The new Chandra results provide convincing evidence for gravitational redshift effects at play in a new cosmic setting.

The intriguing system known as 4U 1916-053 contains two stars in a remarkably close orbit. One is the core of a star that has had its outer layers stripped away, leaving a star that is much denser than the Sun. The other is a neutron star, an even denser object created when a massive star collapses in a supernova explosion. The neutron star (grey) is shown in this artist’s impression at the center of a disk of hot gas pulled away from its companion (white star on left). ...

How does this connect with General Relativity and GPS? As predicted by Einstein's theory, clocks under the force of gravity run at a slower rate than clocks viewed from a distant region experiencing weaker gravity. This means that clocks on Earth observed from orbiting satellites run at a slower rate. To have the high precision needed for GPS, this effect needs to be taken into account or there will be small differences in time that would add up quickly, calculating inaccurate positions. ...

A Redshifted Inner Disk Atmosphere and Transient Absorbers
in the Ultracompact Neutron Star X-Ray Binary 4U 1916–053
~ Nicolas Trueba et al
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