Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

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Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby bystander » Sun Aug 26, 2012 12:30 am

Family Statement Regarding the Death of Neil Armstrong
We are heartbroken to share the news that Neil Armstrong has passed away following complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures.

Neil was our loving husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend.

Neil Armstrong was also a reluctant American hero who always believed he was just doing his job. He served his Nation proudly, as a navy fighter pilot, test pilot, and astronaut. He also found success back home in his native Ohio in business and academia, and became a community leader in Cincinnati.

He remained an advocate of aviation and exploration throughout his life and never lost his boyhood wonder of these pursuits.

As much as Neil cherished his privacy, he always appreciated the expressions of good will from people around the world and from all walks of life.

While we mourn the loss of a very good man, we also celebrate his remarkable life and hope that it serves as an example to young people around the world to work hard to make their dreams come true, to be willing to explore and push the limits, and to selflessly serve a cause greater than themselves.

For those who may ask what they can do to honor Neil, we have a simple request. Honor his example of service, accomplishment and modesty, and the next time you walk outside on a clear night and see the moon smiling down at you, think of Neil Armstrong and give him a wink.

I don't imagine you will dispute the fact that at present the stupid people
are in an absolutely overwhelming majority all the world over.
— Henrik Ibsen
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby Moonlady » Sun Aug 26, 2012 7:59 am

Good bye Neil! I'll wink at you yes
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 Aug 5 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby owlice » Sun Aug 26, 2012 12:27 pm


The Eagle has landed... for the last time.

Oh, it's hard to know he's gone! NASA has a nice page with lots of links on it here.
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby pollen1960@gmail.com » Sun Aug 26, 2012 3:55 pm

Mankind will take take many more steps ,but.... will & can not forget your first step. _ Dr Parag
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby Rothkko » Sun Aug 26, 2012 11:19 pm

The last interview... 'One day someone will fly back to the Moon' // "Un día alguien volará de nuevo a la Luna"
http://thebottomline.cpaaustralia.com.au/
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Pushing the Envelope

Postby neufer » Mon Sep 03, 2012 4:18 pm

http://www.geek.com/articles/geek-ceter ... s-2012093/ wrote:
<<Neil Armstrong was a very intelligent man, and carried out the roles of aerospace engineer and pilot before becoming an astronaut. But his intelligence didn’t just extend to his career, he also knew enough about money to make sure his family and friends were taken care of whatever happened to him in his very dangerous job.

As you’d expect, Neil Armstrong and his fellow astronauts couldn’t get life insurance for their trip to the moon. No insurance company would ever take that gamble when these guys were attempting something that had never been done before. Or at least, any that did wanted a ridiculous amount of money up front.

But that didn’t stop the crew of Apollo 11 taking out a different form of life insurance. No insurance company was involved, however, Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins instead sat there signing autographs during quarantine in the month before launch.

In that time hundreds of autographs were signed by the three. Those autographs were all done on envelopes, which were then handed to a friend who delivered them to the post office for postmarking on specific, important days.

The end result was a load of very valuable envelopes, all carrying the autographs of the astronauts and postmarks on dates such as July 20, 1969. If Apollo 11 had never made it back those envelopes could have been sold for huge sums of money and the astronauts’ families catered for financially. As it turns out, the three returned with the value in those envelopes assured by their historic mission.

If you’re wondering how much such an envelope would fetch, apparently they were selling at auction for $30,000 some 20 years ago. That’s sure to have increased significantly if any were to turn up at auction today.>>
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby emc » Wed Sep 05, 2012 9:53 pm

Neil Armstrong… first person to set foot on the Moon… how cool is that!? I don’t think it can be topped. Even the first person on Mars albeit magnificent would be a bit less inspiring.
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby owlice » Wed Sep 05, 2012 10:06 pm

From the APOD email box:

    The Saudi Society of Culture and Arts has established a photographic exhibition by the photographer Hassan Mabrook on 29/08/2012. Through this exhibition, we are proud to honor the greatest astronomical figure Mr Neil Armstrong through messages of thanks and appreciation from people interested in astronomy in Saudi Arabia [to] his family and NASA.

    armstrongtribute.jpg
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby neufer » Thu Sep 06, 2012 12:12 am



emc wrote:
Neil Armstrong… first person to set foot on the Moon… how cool is that!? I don’t think it can be topped. Even the first person on Mars albeit magnificent would be a bit less inspiring.

There will be much much better coverage, hopefully
including a large crowd of Martian Rovers to greet him/her.
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby jcstewart » Thu Sep 06, 2012 7:09 pm

Moonrise and Sunset, St Andrews
http://www.facebook.com/newlinks.standrews
Copyright: John Stewart


A blue moon over St Andrews in the week Neil Armstrong died. Armstrong was a keen golfer. I met him on the Links three years ago, when he told me he had visited St Andrews "many times".
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby Rothkko » Sat Sep 15, 2012 12:52 pm

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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby neufer » Thu Jan 03, 2013 4:53 pm

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/01/ ... K020130103 wrote:
Armstrong's moon speech not so improvised, brother tells BBC
By Irene Klotz

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., Jan 3 (Reuters) - <<Astronaut Neil Armstrong may not have been speaking entirely off the cuff when he delivered the most iconic quote in the history of manned space flight. Armstrong wrote out the sentence, "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind," before blasting off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, with Apollo astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins in July 1969, his brother now says, according to the transcripts of a documentary recently aired on BBC Two. Because of a radio communications glitch, millions of people watching on television as Armstrong became the first human being to step onto the surface of the moon never heard him utter the word "a" before man.

Armstrong, who died in August at the age of 82, had always maintained he composed the words after touching down on the moon on July 20, 1969, while he waited to leave the Eagle lunar lander. But Armstrong's younger brother Dean, speaking in an interview for the documentary, "Neil Armstrong - First Man on the Moon" aired on Sunday, said that was not entirely accurate. "Dean told me that Neil shared the words with him shortly before he left for the Cape, so maybe a couple weeks before the mission," producer Chris Riley told Reuters. An Armstrong family spokesman did not reply to a request from Reuters for comment.

"I find the timing of Dean Armstrong's revelation to be curious," said Robert Pearlman, owner and curator of CollectSpace.com, a space history website. "Why wait until after his brother died? He was interviewed for Neil's authorized biography in 2002 and apparently never mentioned this story, despite Neil giving permission to his family and friends to speak openly," Pearlman said.

Andrew Chaikin, author of "A Man on the Moon," which served as a template for an HBO miniseries produced by Tom Hanks, said Armstrong was asked many times over the years when he came up with the quote and always replied that it was spoken spontaneously. "He had said that many times publicly before I wrote my book, so I never asked him when he made up the quote," Chaikin said.

In the documentary, Dean Armstrong said he and his brother were up one night shortly before Neil left for Florida playing the board game, Risk, Riley said. Dean said Neil slipped him a piece of paper with the sentence "One small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind," written out and asked Dean what he thought of it, Riley said. Dean replied, "Fabulous," a transcript of the documentary shows. Riley, who was commissioned to produce the documentary after Armstrong's death, said he doesn't see it as raising any real questions about the astronaut's integrity. "Anybody making that historic step onto another world as a human being would have appreciated the significance of it, as Neil did, and would have given it some thought beforehand. It wasn't something that just sort of came to him as he headed down the ladder. But I don't think he fully decided what to say until maybe after landing," Riley said.>>
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby neufer » Thu Jun 13, 2013 6:12 pm

http://www.universetoday.com/102908/the ... cott-1966/ wrote:
Image
The Epitome of Cool: Neil Armstrong and David Scott, 1966
by Nancy Atkinson on June 13, 2013

<<So, you’ve just endured a harrowing experience where your orbiting spacecraft has gone wildly out of control. You somehow — while undergoing the incredible, vertigo-inducing G-forces of your spinning spacecraft — figure out a plan, undock your spacecraft from another spacecraft and abort your original mission.

Six and a half orbits and ten hours and 44 minutes after you’ve thunderously launched into space, you violently re-enter Earth’s atmosphere and splash down in a pitching ocean. Obviously, you have to throw up, and so does your crewmate. But there’s just one air sickness bag.

But by the time the rescue crew has arrived you’ve donned your sunglasses and look as cool as a cucumber.

That’s Neil Armstrong and Dave Scott’s experience during the Gemini 8 mission.>>
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Re: Armstrong, Neil (1930 - 2012 Aug 25)

Postby Chappy » Tue Sep 23, 2014 10:39 pm

neufer wrote:
http://www.universetoday.com/102908/the ... cott-1966/ wrote:
Image
The Epitome of Cool: Neil Armstrong and David Scott, 1966
by Nancy Atkinson on June 13, 2013

<<So, you’ve just endured a harrowing experience where your orbiting spacecraft has gone wildly out of control. You somehow — while undergoing the incredible, vertigo-inducing G-forces of your spinning spacecraft — figure out a plan, undock your spacecraft from another spacecraft and abort your original mission.

Six and a half orbits and ten hours and 44 minutes after you’ve thunderously launched into space, you violently re-enter Earth’s atmosphere and splash down in a pitching ocean. Obviously, you have to throw up, and so does your crewmate. But there’s just one air sickness bag.

But by the time the rescue crew has arrived you’ve donned your sunglasses and look as cool as a cucumber.

That’s Neil Armstrong and Dave Scott’s experience during the Gemini 8 mission.>>


I know I'm late coming to this thread, but I can't resist...these guys INVENTED cool!
R.I.P Mr. Armstrong, this World will never forget you
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