Dawn: Journey to the Asteroid Belt

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bystander
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Dawn: Evidence for Organic Material on Ceres

Postby bystander » Fri Feb 17, 2017 3:36 pm

Dawn Discovers Evidence for Organic Material on Ceres
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Dawn | 2017 Feb 16

NASA's Dawn mission has found evidence for organic material on Ceres, a dwarf planet and the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Scientists using the spacecraft's visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) detected the material in and around a northern-hemisphere crater called Ernutet. Organic molecules are interesting to scientists because they are necessary, though not sufficient, components of life on Earth.

The discovery adds to the growing list of bodies in the solar system where organics have been found. Organic compounds have been found in certain meteorites as well as inferred from telescopic observations of several asteroids. Ceres shares many commonalities with meteorites rich in water and organics -- in particular, a meteorite group called carbonaceous chondrites. This discovery further strengthens the connection between Ceres, these meteorites and their parent bodies. ...

Data presented in the Science paper support the idea that the organic materials are native to Ceres. The carbonates and clays previously identified on Ceres provide evidence for chemical activity in the presence of water and heat. This raises the possibility that the organics were similarly processed in a warm water-rich environment. ...

SwRI scientist studies geology of Ceres to understand origin of organics
Southwest Research Institute | 2017 Feb 16

Dawn spacecraft data suggest organic materials are native to the dwarf planet

organic-concentrations-ceres.jpg

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft recently detected organic-rich areas on Ceres. Scientists evaluated the geology of the regions to conclude that the organics are most likely native to the dwarf planet. Data from the spacecraft suggest that the interior of Ceres is the source of these organic materials, as opposed to arriving via impacting asteroids or comets ...

Ceres is believed to have originated about 4.5 billion years ago at the dawn of our solar system. Studying its organics can help explain the origin, evolution, and distribution of organic species across the solar system. Data from Dawn’s visible and infrared mapping spectrometer show an unusually high concentration of organic matter close to the 50-km diameter Ernutet crater in the northern hemisphere of Ceres. The distribution and characteristics of the organics seem to preclude association with any single crater. The largest concentration appears to drape discontinuously across the southwest floor and rim of Ernutet and onto an older, highly degraded crater. Other organic-rich areas are scattered to the northwest. While other scientists looked at the distribution and spectra of the materials, Marchi focused on the geological settings. ...

Localized aliphatic organic material on the surface of Ceres - M. C. De Sanctis et al
Resolved Spectrophotometric Properties of the Ceres Surface from Dawn Framing Camera Images - S. E. Schröder et al
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neufer
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Re: Dawn: Evidence for Organic Material on Ceres

Postby neufer » Fri Feb 17, 2017 4:02 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceres_(mythology) wrote:
<<In ancient Roman religion, Ceres) was a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships. She was originally the central deity in Rome's so-called plebeian or Aventine Triad, then was paired with her daughter Proserpina in what Romans described as "the Greek rites of Ceres". Her seven-day April festival of Cerealia included the popular Ludi Ceriales (Ceres' games). She was also honoured in the May lustratio of the fields at the Ambarvalia festival, at harvest-time, and during Roman marriages and funeral rites.>>
Art Neuendorffer


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