Where New Horizons is

The cosmos at our fingertips.
User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4443
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Where New Horizons is

Postby orin stepanek » Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:20 pm

Ever wonder of the progress New horizons is making?
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/mission/whereis_nh.php
Up around Jupiter already!
:) Orin
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4443
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Postby orin stepanek » Wed Mar 07, 2007 4:08 pm

This post fits in with today's APOD 3/07/07. http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070307.html
New Horizons is actually past Jupiter.
Orin
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

harry
G'day G'day G'day G'day
Posts: 2881
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 8:04 am
Location: Sydney Australia

Postby harry » Wed Mar 28, 2007 10:19 am

Hello All

New Horizin
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/mission/mission_timeline.html

Interesting,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,to go where no man has gone before
Harry : Smile and live another day.

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4443
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Postby orin stepanek » Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:18 pm

Horizons is in the neighborhood of Saturn's orbital path at this point in time. I found a site that shows Horizon's countdown clock. If anybody is interested. :) http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newho ... index.html
Orin
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

User avatar
Orca
Science Officer
Posts: 453
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 6:58 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Postby Orca » Fri Jun 27, 2008 3:18 pm

New Horizons is the first probe with an ion engine, right?

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 15722
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Postby bystander » Fri Jun 27, 2008 4:42 pm

New Horizons Web Site http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/index.php

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4443
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Postby orin stepanek » Fri Jun 27, 2008 5:25 pm

Orca wrote:New Horizons is the first probe with an ion engine, right?


http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/spacecraft/overview.php

Shows here [using bystanders link] 16 hydrazine thrusters! whether or not it includes ion engines or not I could not find. I do remember that at launch it was supposed to be on the fastest rocket ever launched.
Orin
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

Doum
Science Officer
Posts: 495
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 5:38 pm

Postby Doum » Sun Jun 29, 2008 10:10 pm

Orca Posted: Fri Jun 27, 2008 3:18 pm Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

New Horizons is the first probe with an ion engine, right?

Hi Orca,

No. I think it was Deep space one that use an ion engine. That engine could stay on for a year at least and they use it to explore asteroids. I dont know where it is now in space. I'll make research about it. Cya.

harry
G'day G'day G'day G'day
Posts: 2881
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 8:04 am
Location: Sydney Australia

Postby harry » Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:13 am

G'day from the land of ozzzz

Where is it?

Reminds me of the locality map "WHERE IS"

New Horizin
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/mission/mission_timeline.html
Last edited by harry on Thu Jul 03, 2008 8:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
Harry : Smile and live another day.

Doum
Science Officer
Posts: 495
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 5:38 pm

Postby Doum » Mon Jun 30, 2008 5:04 pm

There you have info about Deep space one probe and it's ion engine.

http://nmp.nasa.gov/ds1/

harry
G'day G'day G'day G'day
Posts: 2881
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 8:04 am
Location: Sydney Australia

Postby harry » Thu Jul 03, 2008 8:07 am

G'day from the land of ozzzzz


How far can you go before they retire you?


http://nmp.nasa.gov/ds1/
The spacecraft was retired on December 18, 2001.
Harry : Smile and live another day.

User avatar
Orca
Science Officer
Posts: 453
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 6:58 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Postby Orca » Thu Jul 03, 2008 4:48 pm

Doum wrote:There you have info about Deep space one probe and it's ion engine.

http://nmp.nasa.gov/ds1/


Thanks Doum!

I just find the concept of an ion engine fascinating...force equal to that of a piece of paper resting on your hand...tiny acceleration accumulating to great velocity over time. Not to mention the fact that the engine can be used many times while solid propellant engines have their burns planned in advance.



The JPL site for New Horizons doesn't really discuss the propulsion system, by the way.

henk21cm
Science Officer
Posts: 225
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2008 9:47 pm
Location: The Netherlands

Postby henk21cm » Thu Jul 03, 2008 7:40 pm

Orca wrote:The JPL site for New Horizons doesn't really discuss the propulsion system, by the way.


http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/common/content/ ... nGuide.pdf
Page 23, 2nd paragraph: Propulsion.
Regards,
 Henk
21 cm: the universal wavelength of hydrogen

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4443
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby orin stepanek » Wed Dec 30, 2009 10:52 pm

New Horizons passed the half way mark in distance from the Earth. Soon it will pass the half way point in distance from the sun. In less than 10 months it will pass half way time wise. 8-) I wish it were close enough to start taking pictures now. :)
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 13863
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby neufer » Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:42 pm

orin stepanek wrote:New Horizons passed the half way mark in distance from the Earth.

http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002313/ wrote:
Ted Stryk: Report #2 from New Horizons science team meeting

<<This morning, a major topic was the search for Kuiper belt object (KBO) targets. [New Horizons is planned to encounter at least one and as many as three small Kuiper belt objects following its Pluto encounter, but the ones it will encounter might not have been discovered yet. --ESL] There is only one known KBO currently being considered. It has a radius of about 30 kilometers and is magnitude 25.3. The problem in finding targets is that Pluto is passing through the galactic plane, meaning that the background star fields are extremely dense. Searchers are using the Subaru telescope to look for objects against the dark nebulae that block out many of these stars, but it is difficult to track the objects they find once they are no longer in front of the dark nebulae. Right now they are using Subaru's "Suprime" array of 10 CCDs for their search. By the end of the year, a new camera, "Hyper-Suprime," should be available. It has an array of 116 CCDs, each of which covers the same area as the individual CCDs in the original Suprime. This will help to quickly search much more sky (and take images that are a whopping 2 gigabytes each). Unfortunately they did not provide the specific field of view of these instruments.

Meanwhile, another team is looking for KBO targets and is using the dense star fields to its advantage, using the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensors to look for occultations and then trying to recover any occulting objects. They have already had one success, but it is 14 degrees out of the ecliptic.

The team is also using Suprime to look for Neptune Trojans that
Image
New Horizons can observe when it passes through Neptune's L5 point in 2014.

[No Neptune Trojans] are known because no one has looked for them, but they theoretically should exist. Even if they are found, New Horizons will most likely not be able to resolve them as anything more than one pixel. New Horizons might at least provide phase curve data. It would take a huge stroke of luck to get anything better, since actually targeting one of these objects would mean diverting the trajectory away from Pluto. There was also an attempt to recover the potential Himalia ring, but this was not successful.

There was a paper showing New Horizons' results as it flew down the Jovian magnetotail, the first spacecraft to do so.

Dale Cruikshank attempted to look for evidence of methane on Triton in spectra taken in the 1940s by Gerard Kuiper. Unfortunately, an observing assistant – "Brown" (his first name is not recorded) – apparently obscured the portion of the spectrum where methane would appear with a fingerprint, rendering it useless. Cruikshank pointed out that this is likely why we haven't heard of "Brown." However, recent spectra taken with Akari, a Japanese space telescope operating in the red, clearly shows evidence of methane and of HCN. The HCN is thought to be produced in the atmosphere. Spitzer and Voyager's infrared instrument are not sensitive to the band observed. This band shows reflected sunlight, not thermal emissions. Will Grundy showed spectroscopic work indicating that methane, while present globally on Triton, is concentrated in a spot at about 300 degrees longitude and likely in the mid-to-high southern latitudes. This corresponds to a unique pink spot in Voyager data.

Francesca DeMeo showed recent evidence she has obtained showing ethane to be present on Pluto. Several people presented atmospheric results from occultations, showing that the atmosphere has greatly increased in pressure since the first good occultation observation in 1988. There are two good occultations this year, the first on Valentine's Day and visible from Europe, and the second, on July 4th, will be visible from South America and Africa.>>
Art Neuendorffer

makc
Commodore
Posts: 2019
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2004 5:25 pm

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby makc » Mon Jan 25, 2010 8:56 am

neufer wrote:Unfortunately, an observing assistant – "Brown" (his first name is not recorded) – apparently obscured the portion of the spectrum where methane would appear with a fingerprint, rendering it useless. Cruikshank pointed out that this is likely why we haven't heard of "Brown."
that, or Brown was MIB agent hiding traces of ETI.

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 13863
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby neufer » Mon Feb 15, 2010 3:54 pm

neufer wrote:
http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002313/ wrote:
Ted Stryk: Report #2 from New Horizons science team meeting

    Memorable quotes for Airplane! (1980)
    .........................................................
    Rumack: Can you fly this plane, and land it?

    Ted Stryker: Surely you can't be serious.

    Rumack: I am serious... and don't call me Shirley
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 15722
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby bystander » Fri Feb 26, 2010 4:53 pm

New Horizons: The Approach Begins (2010 Feb 25)
Another milestone passed! Today NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is 15.96 astronomical units (about 2.39 billion kilometers, or 1.48 billion miles) from the Sun – putting it halfway between Earth’s location on launch day in January 2006, and Pluto’s place during New Horizons’ encounter with the planet in July 2015.

“From here on out, we’re on approach to an encounter with the Pluto system,” says New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern, from the Southwest Research Institute. “The second half of the journey begins.”

This is rare territory; New Horizons is just the fifth probe, after Pioneers 10 - 11 and Voyagers 1 – 2, to traverse interplanetary space so far from the Sun. And it’s the first to travel so far to reach a new planet for exploration.

Humming along at more than 16 kilometers per second – more than 36,600 miles per hour - the spacecraft will next cross a planetary boundary in March 2011, when it passes the orbit of Uranus.

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 13863
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby neufer » Fri Feb 26, 2010 6:05 pm

bystander wrote:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/news_center/news/20100225.php wrote:New Horizons is just the fifth probe, after Pioneers 10 - 11 and Voyagers 1 – 2, to traverse interplanetary space so far from the Sun. And it’s the first to travel so far to reach a new planet for exploration.

Make that Dwarf planet.
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 12911
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby Chris Peterson » Fri Feb 26, 2010 8:06 pm

neufer wrote:Make that Dwarf planet.

It would require a truly bizarre sort of logic to conclude that a "dwarf planet" isn't also a "planet".

In the context of the original passage, "dwarf planet" would be a poor choice, since the comparison was being made between the distance that New Horizons has traveled in its goal to reach a particular planet, and the distance that other probes traveled to reach different planets.

This provides an excellent example of just why "planet" is more useful without a rigorous definition. If planet actually meant only what the IAU has defined it as (which, of course, it doesn't), it would require a cumbersome sentence to say what was said simply- and completely clearly- in the referenced passage.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 13863
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby neufer » Fri Feb 26, 2010 8:54 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
neufer wrote:Make that Dwarf planet.

It would require a truly bizarre sort of logic to conclude that a "dwarf planet" isn't also a "planet".

In the context of the original passage, "dwarf planet" would be a poor choice, since the comparison was being made between the distance that New Horizons has traveled in its goal to reach a particular planet, and the distance that other probes traveled to reach different planets.

This provides an excellent example of just why "planet" is more useful without a rigorous definition. If planet actually meant only what the IAU has defined it as (which, of course, it doesn't), it would require a cumbersome sentence to say what was said simply- and completely clearly- in the referenced passage.

See:
http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/vie ... 28#p116628
http://bb.nightskylive.net/asterisk/vie ... 65#p116665
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4443
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby orin stepanek » Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:53 pm

I'll always think of Pluto as a planet. I think of other so called dwarfs as planets as well; Eris, Sedna, and others. 8-)
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 13863
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby neufer » Sat Feb 27, 2010 2:25 pm

orin stepanek wrote:I'll always think of Pluto as a planet.
I think of other so called dwarfs as planets as well; Eris, Sedna, and others. 8-)

Are you Ceres?
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4443
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: Where new Horizons is

Postby orin stepanek » Sat Feb 27, 2010 3:25 pm

Why not Ceres? :mrgreen: Seriously! :wink: I'm Ceres about Makemake also; but what a name! 8-)
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!


Return to “The Asterisk Café: Discuss Anything Astronomy Related”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot], neufer and 0 guests