Voyager I and II

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saturno2
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Sat Dec 14, 2013 4:01 am

Voyager 1 and 2
Distance from the Sun ( now)
Voyager 1 / 18.8 billion of km
Voyager 2 / 15.4 billion of km

saturno2
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Mon Dec 16, 2013 2:35 pm

It is the humanity
further of the humanity
It is the life
in contact with the stars.
The evolution of the technique
applied in two spacecraft
Voyager 1 and 2
that, wich piano
that emitting beautiful musical notes
they radiate
love and intelligence
through sideral space.
Two jewels carry
are gold records
with a sample of the knowledge
of the homo sapiens.
Of the Solar System
in the edges
between the solar wind
and the stars.
Transmiting with low energy
wich colossal athete
of a galactic marathon
Voyager 1 and 2 maintain the expectancy
of an alien encounter
for to know that we are not
so alone
so alone
in the inmensity of the Universe... // By saturno2

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Mon Mar 03, 2014 2:47 am

Distance from the Sun to Voyager 2, now:
15.58 billion kms

saturno2
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Thu Jun 05, 2014 9:37 pm

The pass of Voyager 2 near of Jupiter
was in july 1979.
The work of Voyager 2 is very important
for the study of Jupiter by Juno spacecraft
in 2016.

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Sat Jul 19, 2014 1:07 am

Voyager 2
Distance from the Sun, now
15,76 billion km

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AGU: Voyager might not have reached interstellar space

Postby bystander » Tue Jul 29, 2014 6:09 pm

Voyager spacecraft might not have reached interstellar space
American Geophysical Union | University of Michigan | 2014 July 23

In 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that the Voyager 1 spacecraft had passed into interstellar space, traveling further from Earth than any other manmade object.

But, in the nearly two years since that historic announcement, and despite subsequent observations backing it up, uncertainty about whether Voyager 1 really crossed the threshold continues. There are some scientists who say that the spacecraft is still within the heliosphere – the region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles – and has not yet reached the space between the stars.

Now, two Voyager team scientists have developed a test that they say could prove once and for all if Voyager 1 has crossed the boundary. The new test is outlined in a study accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

The scientists predict that, in the next two years, Voyager 1 will cross the current sheet – the sprawling surface within the heliosphere where the polarity of the sun’s magnetic field changes from plus to minus. The spacecraft will detect a reversal in the magnetic field, proving that it is still within the heliosphere. But, if the magnetic field reversal doesn’t happen in the next year or two as expected, that is confirmation that Voyager 1 has already passed into interstellar space. ...

A test for whether or not Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause - G. Gloeckler, L. A. Fisk
On Whether or Not Voyager 1 has Crossed the Heliopause - L. A. Fisk, G. Gloeckler
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Fri Aug 22, 2014 6:25 pm

Voyager 2
Now
Distance from the Sun 15.81 billion km
Speed relative to the Sun 15.86 Km/sec

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Voyager: 'Tsunami' Still Flies Through Interstellar Space

Postby bystander » Tue Dec 16, 2014 2:14 am

Voyager: 'Tsunami Wave' Still Flies Through Interstellar Space
NASA | JPL Caltech | Voyager | 2014 Dec 15

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
  • The Voyager 1 spacecraft has experienced three shock waves

  • The most recent shock wave, first observed in February 2014, still appears to be going on

  • One wave, previously reported, helped researchers determine that Voyager 1 had entered interstellar space
The "tsunami wave" that NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft began experiencing earlier this year is still propagating outward, according to new results. It is the longest-lasting shock wave that researchers have seen in interstellar space. ...

This is the third shock wave that Voyager 1 has experienced. The first event was in October to November of 2012, and the second wave in April to May of 2013 revealed an even higher plasma density. Voyager 1 detected the most recent event in February, and it is still going on as of November data. The spacecraft has moved outward 250 million miles (400 million kilometers) during the third event. ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Thu Dec 18, 2014 10:14 pm

bystander, thank you for this important note.

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Sun Aug 16, 2015 12:48 am

Voyager 2
Roundtrip light time from Earth
29 hh 58 mm 08 ss

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JPL: Voyager 1 Helps Solve Interstellar Medium Mystery

Postby bystander » Fri Oct 30, 2015 5:22 pm

Voyager 1 Helps Solve Interstellar Medium Mystery
NASA | JPL-Caltech | 2015 Oct 29

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft made history in 2012 by entering interstellar space, leaving the planets and the solar wind behind. But observations from the pioneering probe were puzzling with regard to the magnetic field around it, as they differed from what scientists derived from observations by other spacecraft.

A new study offers fresh insights into this mystery. Writing in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, Nathan Schwadron of the University of New Hampshire, Durham, and colleagues reanalyzed magnetic field data from Voyager 1 and found that the direction of the magnetic field has been slowly turning ever since the spacecraft crossed into interstellar space. They believe this is an effect of the nearby boundary of the solar wind, a stream of charged particles that comes from the sun.

"This study provides very strong evidence that Voyager 1 is in a region where the magnetic field is being deflected by the solar wind," said Schwadron, lead author of the study.

Researchers predict that in 10 years Voyager 1 will reach a more "pristine" region of the interstellar medium where the solar wind does not significantly influence the magnetic field.

Voyager 1's crossing into interstellar space meant it had left the heliosphere -- the bubble of solar wind surrounding our sun and the planets. Observations from Voyager's instruments found that the particle density was 40 times greater outside this boundary than inside, confirming that it had indeed left the heliosphere.

But so far, Voyager 1's observation of the direction of the local interstellar magnetic field is more than 40 degrees off from what other spacecraft have determined. The new study suggests this discrepancy exists because Voyager 1 is in a more distorted magnetic field just outside the heliopause, which is the boundary between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. ...

Study Solves Mysteries of Voyager 1's Journey into Interstellar Space
University of New Hampshire | Earth, Oceans, and Space | 2015 Oct 29

Triangulation of the Interstellar Magnetic Field - N. A. Schwadron et al

viewtopic.php?p=249393#p249393
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Thu Nov 26, 2015 9:50 pm

Voyager 1 Now
Distance from Sun
19.9 billion of Km
Distance from Earth
18 h 35 m 12,5 s ( Light hours )

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Sun Mar 06, 2016 10:14 pm

Distance from the Sun, Now
Voyager 1 20,089,475,000 km
Voyager2 16,540,995,000 km

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35 Years On, Voyager's Legacy Continues at Saturn

Postby bystander » Thu Aug 25, 2016 7:25 pm

35 Years On, Voyager's Legacy Continues at Saturn
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Voyager | 2016 Aug 24


Saturn, with its alluring rings and numerous moons, has long fascinated stargazers and scientists. After an initial flyby of Pioneer 11 in 1979, humanity got a second, much closer look at this complex planetary system in the early 1980s through the eyes of NASA's twin Voyager spacecraft.

Voyager 2 made its closest approach to Saturn 35 years ago -- on Aug. 25, 1981. What the Voyagers revealed at the planet was so phenomenal that, just one year later, a joint American and European working group began discussing a mission that would carry on Voyager's legacy at Saturn. That mission -- named Cassini -- has been studying the Saturn system since 2004. Cassini has followed up on many of Voyager's discoveries, and has deepened our understanding of what some might call a "mini solar system."

"Saturn, like all of the planets the Voyagers visited, was full of exciting discoveries and surprises," said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist at Caltech in Pasadena, California. "By giving us unprecedented views of the Saturn system, Voyager gave us plenty of reasons to go back for a closer look." ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

saturno2
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Sat Nov 26, 2016 10:37 pm

Voyager 2 mission was very very important
in the investigation of Jupiter, Saturn,
Uranus and Neptune planets.


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