Voyager I and II

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MargaritaMc
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby MargaritaMc » Mon Mar 04, 2013 8:28 am

saturno2 wrote:The Voyager Golden Record traveling through interstellar space is as
the old bottles thrown into the sea carrying a message, I don´t know
that port, perharps to infinitely...


The image of the old bottle thrown into the sea is so evocative. The chance of anyone finding it is small, and of doing anything about it even less. But it does happen sometimes..

Here is a nice link about messages in bottles.

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AGU: Voyager 1 has left the solar system

Postby bystander » Wed Mar 20, 2013 5:04 pm

Voyager 1 has left the solar system,
sudden changes in cosmic rays indicate

American Geophysical Union | 2013 Mar 20

Thirty-five years after its launch, Voyager 1 appears to have travelled beyond the influence of the Sun and exited the heliosphere, according to a new study appearing online today.

The heliosphere is a region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles, and which is thought to be enclosed, bubble-like, in the surrounding interstellar medium of gas and dust that pervades the Milky Way galaxy.

On August 25, 2012, NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft measured drastic changes in radiation levels, more than 11 billion miles from the Sun. Anomalous cosmic rays, which are cosmic rays trapped in the outer heliosphere, all but vanished, dropping to less than 1 percent of previous amounts. At the same time, galactic cosmic rays – cosmic radiation from outside of the solar system – spiked to levels not seen since Voyager's launch, with intensities as much as twice previous levels.

The findings have been accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

"Within just a few days, the heliospheric intensity of trapped radiation decreased, and the cosmic ray intensity went up as you would expect if it exited the heliosphere," said Bill Webber, professor emeritus of astronomy at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. He calls this transition boundary the "heliocliff."

In the GRL article, the authors state: "It appears that [Voyager 1] has exited the main solar modulation region, revealing [hydrogen] and [helium] spectra characteristic of those to be expected in the local interstellar medium."

However, Webber notes, scientists are continuing to debate whether Voyager 1 has reached interstellar space or entered a separate, undefined region beyond the solar system.

"It's outside the normal heliosphere, I would say that," Webber said. "We're in a new region. And everything we're measuring is different and exciting."

Recent Voyager 1 data indicate that on August 25, 2012 at a distance of 121.7 AU from the Sun,
sudden and unprecedented intensity changes were observed in anomalous and galactic cosmic rays

    W. R. Webber, F. B. McDonald Geophysical Research Letters (2013) DOI: 10.1002/grl.50383
At Voyager 1 Starting on about August 25, 2012 at a Distance of 121.7 AU from the
Sun, a Sudden Disappearance of Anomalous Cosmic Rays and an Unusually Large
Sudden Increase of Galactic Cosmic Ray H and He Nuclei and Electron Occurred


Scientists Say Voyager 1 Has Left the Solar System, But Has It Really?
Universe Today | Nancy Atkinson | 2013 Mar 20

Bon Voyage! Voyager 1 Exits Our Solar System
Discovery News | Irene Klotz | 2013 Mar 20
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby mjimih » Wed Mar 20, 2013 5:48 pm

http://science.time.com/2013/03/20/huma ... liosphere/

Is there a "galactic wind"? In which case we could postulate that we have entered a transition area, a neutral area for some distance, that is neither influenced by our solar system or the normal most empty regions between star systems or nebula. It could be thick or thin I suppose, where we still have yet to detect the true interstellar realm.

Which has even more cosmic rays in it?, doubling the readings again perhaps? (rhetorical)

What other radiation might be detected after we know we are in the interstellar realm? X-rays?
Aliens will find Earth absolutely amazingly beautiful and fragile to behold. But if they get close enough, they'll see 7,000,000,000 of us and think "Uh oh, that's a lot for such a small planet. Wonder if we should help?"

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby neufer » Wed Mar 20, 2013 8:17 pm

http://www.universetoday.com/100894/ wrote:Scientists Say Voyager 1 Has Left the Solar System, But Has It Really?
by Nancy Atkinson on March 20, 2013

<<“Within just a few days, the heliospheric intensity of trapped radiation decreased, and the cosmic ray intensity went up as you would expect if it exited the heliosphere,” said Webber in an AGU press release. Webber is a professor emeritus of astronomy at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces.

He called this transition boundary the “heliocliff.”

In the GRL article, the authors say, “It appears that [Voyager 1] has exited the main solar modulation region, revealing [hydrogen] and [helium] spectra characteristic of those to be expected in the local interstellar medium.” However, last December in a NASA press conference, the Voyager team said they infered this region is still inside our solar bubble because the direction of the magnetic field lines has not changed. The direction of these magnetic field lines is predicted to change when Voyager breaks through to interstellar space.>>
Art Neuendorffer

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Elvis has NOT left the building

Postby bystander » Wed Mar 20, 2013 8:18 pm

NASA Voyager Status Update on Voyager 1 Location
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Solar System Exploration | 2013 Mar 20

"The Voyager team is aware of reports today that NASA's Voyager 1 has left the solar system," said Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. "It is the consensus of the Voyager science team that Voyager 1 has not yet left the solar system or reached interstellar space. In December 2012, the Voyager science team reported that Voyager 1 is within a new region called 'the magnetic highway' where energetic particles changed dramatically. A change in the direction of the magnetic field is the last critical indicator of reaching interstellar space and that change of direction has not yet been observed."

Voyager 1 Has Apparently Left the Solar System [CORRECTED]
Slate Blogs | Bad Astronomy | 2013 Mar 20

ScienceShot: Has Voyager 1 Left the Solar System?
Science NOW | Sid Perkins | 2013 Mar 20

The articles referenced at viewtopic.php?p=195604#p195604 have all been updated and some titles changed.

AGU: Voyager 1 has entered a new region of space, sudden changes in cosmic rays indicate
UT: Scientists Say Voyager 1 Has Left the Solar System, But Has It Really?
DN: Voyager 1 Hits New Solar System Exit Zone

To learn more about the current status of the Voyager mission, viewtopic.php?p=188821#p188821

Voyager: Looking Backward and Forward
Centauri Dreams | Paul Gilster | 2013 Mar 21
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:22 am

Seems that Voyager 1 has left behind the heliopause.
For NASA, the heliopause is the limit of the Solar System.
Then, Voyager 1 would already be in interstellar space.
It´s an important event, as the first astronaut on the Moon in 1969

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xkcd: Voyager 1

Postby bystander » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:31 am

Image
2013 March 22


Image

Randall Munroe (xkcd) wrote:
So far Voyager 1 has 'left the Solar System' by passing through the termination shock three times, the heliopause twice, and once each through the heliosheath, heliosphere, heliodrome, auroral discontinuity, Heaviside layer, trans-Neptunian panic zone, magnetogap, US Census Bureau Solar System statistical boundary, Kuiper gauntlet, Oort void, and crystal sphere holding the fixed stars.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: xkcd: Voyager 1

Postby Ann » Fri Mar 22, 2013 6:46 am

bystander wrote:
Image
2013 March 22


Image

Randall Munroe (xkcd) wrote:
So far Voyager 1 has 'left the Solar System' by passing through the termination shock three times, the heliopause twice, and once each through the heliosheath, heliosphere, heliodrome, auroral discontinuity, Heaviside layer, trans-Neptunian panic zone, magnetogap, US Census Bureau Solar System statistical boundary, Kuiper gauntlet, Oort void, and crystal sphere holding the fixed stars.


:lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2:

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Thu Apr 11, 2013 12:25 am

Voyager 2
Now
Distance from the Sun 15.16 billion of km
Speed aprox. 14.53 km / sec ( Relative to the Sun)

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby MargaritaMc » Sun Apr 28, 2013 7:23 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.

June 2012 video

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/faq.html
Question: In your opinion, what were the most important discoveries of the Voyager space probes?
 
Answer: There are so many. Voyager is probably the most scientifically productive mission ever. It was only the second mission to visit Jupiter and Saturn and the only one to visit Uranus and Neptune. Voyager 1 and 2 obtained the first detailed profiles of the atmospheres of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune and improved our understanding of the characteristics of the atmosphere of Jupiter. The Voyager spacecraft revealed the enormous amount of detail in the rings of Saturn, discovered the rings of Jupiter and provided the first detailed images of the rings of Uranus and Neptune. Voyager imaged Earth's moon and discovered twenty-three new moons at the outer planets. Voyager made significant improvements in the measurements of the magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn and provided the first measurements of the magnetospheres at Uranus and Neptune. The significance of the Voyager is the vast amount of new knowledge about our outer solar system it provided and the interest in further exploration it generated. That interest has resulted in the Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Cassini mission to Saturn as well as the discovery of three new satellites at Saturn using Earth-based instruments.

Discovery of active volcanism on Io, a satellite of Jupiter, was probably the greatest surprise. It was the first time active volcanoes had been seen on another body in the solar system. It appears that activity on Io affects the entire Jovian system.


Not exactly news, but I hadn't seen this video before, and I thought the assessment of the Voyagers is interesting

Margarita
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Where is saturno2?

Postby MargaritaMc » Sat Jun 01, 2013 7:58 am

Does anyone have any non- forum contact with Asterisk member saturno2, who usually posts regularly, especially on this thread?
I wrote him a private message ten days ago and it is still in my out box. He usually responds within a day or two and I'm just a little concerned.
But he is probably on holiday.

Margarita
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: Where is saturno2?

Postby saturno2 » Wed Jun 05, 2013 5:31 pm

MargaritaMc wrote:Does anyone have any non- forum contact with Asterisk member saturno2, who usually posts regularly, especially on this thread?
I wrote him a private message ten days ago and it is still in my out box. He usually responds within a day or two and I'm just a little concerned.
But he is probably on holiday.

Margarita


Margarita
Best regards
Thank you for your atention.
I am here, but I was with problems in Internet of my area.
Cordially
saturno2

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby Beyond » Wed Jun 05, 2013 7:05 pm

Ah, saturno2's inter-net, had a hole in it. That seems to happen quite often, but yet... no-one ever seems to escape. Curious :!:
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby MargaritaMc » Wed Jun 05, 2013 7:11 pm

So glad to see you again, saturno2!
Margarita
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: xkcd: Voyager 1

Postby orin stepanek » Tue Jun 11, 2013 9:56 pm

bystander wrote:
Image
2013 March 22


Image

Randall Munroe (xkcd) wrote:
So far Voyager 1 has 'left the Solar System' by passing through the termination shock three times, the heliopause twice, and once each through the heliosheath, heliosphere, heliodrome, auroral discontinuity, Heaviside layer, trans-Neptunian panic zone, magnetogap, US Census Bureau Solar System statistical boundary, Kuiper gauntlet, Oort void, and crystal sphere holding the fixed stars.


Anyway you look at it; voyager 1 is "Far Out Man!" :mrgreen: 8-) :lol2: :wink: :yes: :eyebrows:
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Wed Jun 12, 2013 11:55 am

Other day, in seven minutes, the speed of Voyager 2 had
different readings 15 km/sec - 14 km/sec - 15 km/sec

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby rstevenson » Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:25 pm

Maybe it hit some dark matter. ;-)

Rob

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby Chris Peterson » Wed Jun 12, 2013 2:08 pm

saturno2 wrote:Other day, in seven minutes, the speed of Voyager 2 had
different readings 15 km/sec - 14 km/sec - 15 km/sec

Probably something like 14.50001, 14.49999, 14.50001.
Chris

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby neufer » Wed Jun 12, 2013 4:03 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
saturno2 wrote:
Other day, in seven minutes, the speed of Voyager 2 had
different readings 15 km/sec - 14 km/sec - 15 km/sec

Probably something like 14.50001, 14.49999, 14.50001.

    The "other day" :?:
http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/weekly-reports/ wrote:
    Current Voyager 2 velocity relative to Sun: 15.431 Km/sec
    (Current Voyager 2 velocity relative to Earth: 25.415 Km/sec)

Sun's average orbital speed around Sun/Jupiter center of gravity ~ 0.013 Km/sec
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Thu Jun 13, 2013 10:53 am

Other day, I mean a day before ( not yesterday)
I think the variation of the speed of Voyager 2 ( relative to the Sun )
was for Internet failures. Maybe

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Voyager 1 Explores Final Frontier of Our 'Solar Bubble'

Postby bystander » Fri Jun 28, 2013 4:46 pm

Voyager 1 Explores Final Frontier of Our 'Solar Bubble'
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Voyager | 2013 Jun 27



Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Voyager 1 Explores the "Magnetic Highway"
Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Data from Voyager 1, now more than 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) from the sun, suggest the spacecraft is closer to becoming the first human-made object to reach interstellar space.

Research using Voyager 1 data and published in the journal Science today provides new detail on the last region the spacecraft will cross before it leaves the heliosphere, or the bubble around our sun, and enters interstellar space. Three papers describe how Voyager 1's entry into a region called the magnetic highway resulted in simultaneous observations of the highest rate so far of charged particles from outside heliosphere and the disappearance of charged particles from inside the heliosphere.

Scientists have seen two of the three signs of interstellar arrival they expected to see: charged particles disappearing as they zoom out along the solar magnetic field, and cosmic rays from far outside zooming in. Scientists have not yet seen the third sign, an abrupt change in the direction of the magnetic field, which would indicate the presence of the interstellar magnetic field.

"This strange, last region before interstellar space is coming into focus, thanks to Voyager 1, humankind's most distant scout," said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "If you looked at the cosmic ray and energetic particle data in isolation, you might think Voyager had reached interstellar space, but the team feels Voyager 1 has not yet gotten there because we are still within the domain of the sun's magnetic field."

Scientists do not know exactly how far Voyager 1 has to go to reach interstellar space. They estimate it could take several more months, or even years, to get there. The heliosphere extends at least 8 billion miles (13 billion kilometers) beyond all the planets in our solar system. It is dominated by the sun's magnetic field and an ionized wind expanding outward from the sun. Outside the heliosphere, interstellar space is filled with matter from other stars and the magnetic field present in the nearby region of the Milky Way.

Voyager 1 and its twin spacecraft, Voyager 2, were launched in 1977. They toured Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune before embarking on their interstellar mission in 1990. They now aim to leave the heliosphere. Measuring the size of the heliosphere is part of the Voyagers' mission.

The Science papers focus on observations made from May to September 2012 by Voyager 1's cosmic ray, low-energy charged particle and magnetometer instruments, with some additional charged particle data obtained through April of this year.

Voyager 2 is about 9 billion miles (15 billion kilometers) from the sun and still inside the heliosphere. Voyager 1 was about 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) from the sun Aug. 25 when it reached the magnetic highway, also known as the depletion region, and a connection to interstellar space. This region allows charged particles to travel into and out of the heliosphere along a smooth magnetic field line, instead of bouncing around in all directions as if trapped on local roads. For the first time in this region, scientists could detect low-energy cosmic rays that originate from dying stars.

"We saw a dramatic and rapid disappearance of the solar-originating particles. They decreased in intensity by more than 1,000 times, as if there was a huge vacuum pump at the entrance ramp onto the magnetic highway," said Stamatios Krimigis, the low-energy charged particle instrument's principal investigator at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. "We have never witnessed such a decrease before, except when Voyager 1 exited the giant magnetosphere of Jupiter, some 34 years ago."

Other charged particle behavior observed by Voyager 1 also indicates the spacecraft still is in a region of transition to the interstellar medium. While crossing into the new region, the charged particles originating from the heliosphere that decreased most quickly were those shooting straightest along solar magnetic field lines. Particles moving perpendicular to the magnetic field did not decrease as quickly. However, cosmic rays moving along the field lines in the magnetic highway region were somewhat more populous than those moving perpendicular to the field. In interstellar space, the direction of the moving charged particles is not expected to matter.

In the span of about 24 hours, the magnetic field originating from the sun also began piling up, like cars backed up on a freeway exit ramp. But scientists were able to quantify that the magnetic field barely changed direction -- by no more than 2 degrees.

"A day made such a difference in this region with the magnetic field suddenly doubling and becoming extraordinarily smooth," said Leonard Burlaga, the lead author of one of the papers, and based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "But since there was no significant change in the magnetic field direction, we're still observing the field lines originating at the sun."

At the Solar System's Edge, More Surprises from NASA's Voyager
Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory | 2013 Jun 27

Voyager 1 Approaches Interstellar Space
NASA Science News | Dr. Tony Phillips | 2013 Jun 27

Magnetic Field Observations as Voyager 1 Entered the Heliosheath Depletion Region - L. F. Burlaga et al
Search for the Exit: Voyager 1 at Heliosphere’s Border with the Galaxy - S. M. Krimigis et al
Voyager 1 Observes Low-Energy Galactic Cosmic Rays in a Region Depleted of Heliospheric Ions - E. C. Stone et al
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Tue Jul 02, 2013 3:43 am

bystander
Thanks for your links. Very interesting.
Voyager Mission is very important.

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby Ann » Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:06 am

garyclaytonpalmer wrote:
It states above that there are instructions of how to play the disk. If we encountered a message from a distant civilisation how would we ever desypher what it said ? How will a intelligent being do the same from out unknown language?


Don't worry, the aliens probably speak Turkish! :D

I read the book about those golden disks long ago, and I don't know where the book has gone. But I distinctly remember that somebody (Carl Sagan?) went to the U.N. building in New York and asked delegations from a lot of different countries to send greetings in their own languages to alien civilizations in space. I also distinctly remember that the spokesman for the Turkish delegation sent this message (in Turkish) into space:

Hello, all Turkish-speaking friends...

So as long as the instructions to the aliens are in Turkish, the little green critters should be able to read them all right! :D

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby saturno2 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 3:48 am

Voyager 2 took photos of Saturn. Uranus and Neptune
This photos are high resolution and very interesting
I have not hand of Jupiter.
Well,but what "see " the Voyager 2, now?

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Re: Voyager I and II

Postby geckzilla » Wed Aug 21, 2013 5:43 am

It isn't "seeing" anymore. http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/faq.html

Unless you count detecting interstellar particles as seeing.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.


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