ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

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ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

Post by bystander » Sat May 05, 2012 12:41 am

JUICE is Europe’s next large science mission
ESA Space Science | 2012 May 02
Jupiter’s icy moons are the focus of Europe’s next large science mission, ESA announced today.

The Jupiter Icy moons Explorer – JUICE – was selected over two other candidates: NGO, the New Gravitational wave Observatory, to hunt for gravitational waves, and ATHENA, the Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics.

JUICE is the first Large-class mission chosen as part of ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme.

It will be launched in 2022 from Europe’s spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, on an Ariane 5, arriving at Jupiter in 2030 to spend at least three years making detailed observations.

Jupiter’s diverse Galilean moons – volcanic Io, icy Europa and rock-ice Ganymede and Callisto – make the jovian system a miniature Solar System in its own right.

With Europa, Ganymede and Callisto all thought to host internal oceans, the mission will study the moons as potential habitats for life, addressing two key themes of Cosmic Vision: what are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life, and how does the Solar System work?

JUICE will continuously observe Jupiter’s atmosphere and magnetosphere, and the interaction of the Galilean moons with the gas giant planet.

It will visit Callisto, the most heavily cratered object in the Solar System, and will twice fly by Europa. JUICE will make the first measurements of the thickness of Europa’s icy crust and will identify candidate sites for future in situ exploration.

The spacecraft will finally enter orbit around Ganymede in 2032, where it will study the icy surface and internal structure of the moon, including its subsurface ocean.

Ganymede is the only moon in the Solar System known to generate its own magnetic field, and JUICE will observe the unique magnetic and plasma interactions with Jupiter’s magnetosphere in detail.

“Jupiter is the archetype for the giant planets of the Solar System and for many giant planets being found around other stars,” says Prof. Alvaro Giménez Cañete, ESA’s Director of Science and Robotic Exploration.

“JUICE will give us better insight into how gas giants and their orbiting worlds form, and their potential for hosting life.”

"The selection process has been challenging given the excellent quality of the three mission candidates, and I would like to thank the Space Science Advisory Committee for its hard work and for having carried out this very challenging process in a very rigorous way," says the Chair of ESA’s Science Programme Committee, Dr Richard Bonneville.

Today’s announcement is the culmination of a process started in 2004 when ESA consulted the wider scientific community to set Europe’s goals for space exploration in the coming decade.

The resulting Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme identified four scientific aims. What are the conditions for life and planetary formation? How does the Solar System work? What are the fundamental laws of the Universe? How did the Universe begin and what is it made of?

In 2007, a ’Call for Missions’ was issued around these aims and resulted in a number of L-class missions being considered.

“It was a difficult decision to choose one mission from three excellent candidates. All three would produce world-class science and put Europe at the forefront of space research,” says Prof. Giménez Cañete.

“JUICE is a necessary step for the future exploration of our outer Solar System.”

The high scientific value of both NGO and ATHENA was also recognised by the Science Programme Committee in today’s decision, and technology activities are planned to continue, enabling the missions to be considered as candidates for future launch opportunities. A second Call for Large Missions is expected in 2013.

ESA Turns On The JUICE For New Jupiter Mission
Universe Today | Jason Major | 2012 May 02

Jupiter Picked for Next Major European Space Mission
Science Insider | Edwin Cartlidge | 2012 May 02

Europe Plans Mission to Jupiter's Moons
Discovery News | Irene Klotz | 2012 May 04

http://asterisk.apod.com/viewtopic.php? ... 48#p173948
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Re: ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

Post by neufer » Sat May 05, 2012 3:15 am

[c]------------------------------------
ALL THESE WORLDS
ARE YOURS EXCEPT
EUROPA
ATTEMPT NO
LANDING THERE
USE THEM TOGETHER
USE THEM IN PEACE
------------------------------------[/c][/color]
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

Post by neufer » Wed May 09, 2012 4:56 pm

[c]------------------------------------
ALL THESE WORLDS
ARE YOURS EXCEPT
EUROPA
ATTEMPT NO
LANDING THERE
USE THEM TOGETHER
USE THEM IN PEACE
------------------------------------[/c][/color]
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/05071407.html wrote: In Honor of JUICE, a New View of Europa
Posted By Ted Stryk, 2012/05/07


<<On May 2, 2012, the European Space Agency (ESA) approved the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE) mission, which will conduct flybys of Jupiter's moons Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa before settling into orbit around Ganymede. The mission is slated to arrive in 2030. It is not known yet whether NASA will choose to participate or (hopefully) send its own mission to conduct a detailed study of Europa. The exciting thing is that even if NASA does drop the ball on outer planets exploration, it appears that ESA will take up the mantle.

To celebrate the selection of ESA's new mission to Jupiter and its icy moons, I have reprocessed another Galileo view of Europa. The dataset I processed was obtained by the Galileo spacecraft on September 25, 1998, during its 17th orbit of Jupiter. I processed it by reducing compressing artifacts and noise and bringing out detail. I removed noise by hand instead of using an automated denoising algorithm. There was a lot of noise in the image, but no automated removal method did a good job of removing it without wreaking havoc on the little ridges. I borrowed color data from other data sets. This image shows areas of Europa not visible in the global views I have processed in the past, though there is some overlap along the terminator (day-night boundary) with other images.>>
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ESA chooses instruments for JUpiter ICy moons Explorer

Post by bystander » Thu Feb 21, 2013 5:00 pm

ESA chooses instruments for JUpiter ICy moons Explorer
ESA Space Science | JUICE | 2013 Feb 21

The JUpiter ICy moons Explorer mission, JUICE, will carry a total of 11 scientific experiments to study the gas giant planet and its large ocean-bearing moons, ESA announced today.

JUICE is the first Large-class mission in ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015–2025 programme. Planned for launch in 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in 2030, it will spend at least three years making detailed observations of the biggest planet in the Solar System and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa.

These moons are thought to harbour vast water oceans beneath their icy surfaces and JUICE will map their surfaces, sound their interiors and assess their potential for hosting life in their oceans.

Today, ESA’s Science Programme Committee approved a complement of instruments that includes cameras and spectrometers, a laser altimeter and an ice-penetrating radar. The mission will also carry a magnetometer, plasma and particle monitors, and radio science hardware.

The instruments will be developed by scientific teams from 15 European countries, the US and Japan, through corresponding national funding.

“The selection of JUICE’s instruments is a key milestone in ESA’s flagship mission to the outer Solar System, which represents an unprecedented opportunity to showcase leading European technological and scientific expertise,” says Alvaro Giménez Cañete, ESA’s Director of Science and Robotic Exploration.

“The suite of instruments addresses all of the mission’s science goals, from in-situ measurements of Jupiter’s vast magnetic field and plasma environment, to remote observations of the surfaces and interiors of the three icy moons,” adds Luigi Colangeli, coordinator of ESA’s Solar System Missions.

Throughout its mission, JUICE will observe Jupiter’s atmosphere and magnetosphere, and the interaction of all four Galilean satellites – the three icy moons plus Io – with the gas giant planet.

The spacecraft will perform a dozen flybys of Callisto, the most heavily cratered object in the Solar System, and will fly past Europa twice in order to make the first measurements of the thickness of its icy crust.

JUICE will end up in orbit around Ganymede, where it will study the moon’s icy surface and internal structure, including its subsurface ocean.

The largest moon in the Solar System, Ganymede is the only one known to generate its own magnetic field, and JUICE will observe the unique magnetic and plasma interactions with Jupiter’s magnetosphere in detail.

“Jupiter and its icy moons constitute a kind of mini-Solar System in their own right, offering European scientists and our international partners the chance to learn more about the formation of potentially habitable worlds around other stars,” says Dmitrij Titov, ESA’s JUICE Study Scientist.

The selection of the instruments today helps to ensure that JUICE remains on schedule for launch in 2022.

List of selected experiments:
  • JANUS: Jovis, Amorum ac Natorum Undique Scrutator, camera system
    MAJIS: Moons and Jupiter Imaging Spectrometer
    UVS: UV Imaging Spectrograph
    SWI: Sub-millimetre Wave Instrument
    GALA: Ganymede Laser Altimeter
    RIME: Radar for Icy Moons Exploration
    J-MAG: Magnetometer for JUICE
    PEP: Particle Environment Package
    RPWI: Radio & Plasma Wave Investigation
    3GM: Gravity & Geophysics of Jupiter and Galilean Moons
    PRIDE: Planetary Radio Interferometer & Doppler Experiment
    (note this does not include spacecraft hardware but will exploit VLBI – Very Large Base Interferometry – to conduct radio science)
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NASA and JPL Contribute to European Jupiter Mission

Post by bystander » Fri Feb 22, 2013 6:26 am

NASA and JPL Contribute to European Jupiter Mission
NASA | JPL-Caltech | 2013 Feb 21

NASA has selected key contributions to a 2022 European Space Agency (ESA) mission that will study Jupiter and three of its largest moons in unprecedented detail. The moons are thought to harbor vast water oceans beneath their icy surfaces.

NASA's contribution will consist of one U.S.-led science instrument and hardware for two European instruments to fly on ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) mission. JUICE will carry 11 experiments developed by scientific teams from 15 European countries, the United States and Japan.

The spacecraft will orbit Jupiter for three years and travel past its moons Callisto and Europa multiple times, then orbit Ganymede, a moon larger than the planet Mercury. JUICE will conduct the first thorough exploration of Jupiter since NASA's Galileo mission from 1989-2003. By studying the Jupiter system, JUICE will look to learn more about the formation and evolution of potentially habitable worlds in our solar system and beyond.
...
The NASA contributions are:
  • Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS): The principal investigator is Randy Gladstone of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. This spectrometer will acquire images to explore the surfaces and atmospheres of Jupiter's icy moons and how they interact with the Jupiter environment. The instrument also will determine how Jupiter's upper atmosphere interacts with its lower atmosphere below, and the ionosphere and magnetosphere above. The instrument will provide images of the aurora on Jupiter and Ganymede.
  • Radar for Icy Moon Exploration (RIME): The principal investigator is Lorenzo Bruzzone of Universita degli Studi di Trento in Italy. The U.S. lead is Jeffrey Plaut of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. Under the lead of Bruzzone and the Italian Space Agency, JPL will provide the transmitter and receiver hardware for a radar sounder designed to penetrate the icy crust of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto to a depth of about 5 miles (9 kilometers). This will allow scientists to see for the first time the underground structure of these tectonically complex and unique icy worlds.
  • Particle Environment Package (PEP): The principal investigator is Stas Barabash of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics. The U.S. lead is Pontus Brandt of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md. Under the lead of Barabash and the Swedish National Space Board, APL will provide instruments to this suite to measure the neutral material and plasma that are accelerated and heated to extreme levels in Jupiter's fierce and complex magnetic environment.
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Re: ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

Post by bystander » Thu Mar 07, 2013 7:09 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Instruments for the JUICE Jovian Mission
Planetary Society | Van Kane | 2013 Mar 07
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Re: ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

Post by Beyond » Thu Mar 07, 2013 7:28 pm

Landing on Europa in 2037 :?: Uh-oh... get ready for the unleashing of the Monoliths!! It could get quite :ohno: :yes:
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Re: ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

Post by MargaritaMc » Thu Mar 07, 2013 8:05 pm

bystander wrote:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Instruments for the JUICE Jovian Mission
Planetary Society | Van Kane | 2013 Mar 07
I get the impression, from reading the written texts and links posted here, and the blurb at YouTube
This was a proposed mission to Europa by NASA, as interprated by James Cameron.
that the video shows a proposed mission - not, sadly, one that is part of JUICE. Or have I misunderstood?

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Re: ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

Post by bystander » Thu Mar 07, 2013 8:21 pm

MargaritaMc wrote:I get the impression, from reading the written texts and links posted here, and the blurb at YouTube
This was a proposed mission to Europa by NASA, as interprated by James Cameron.
that the video shows a proposed mission - not, sadly, one that is part of JUICE. Or have I misunderstood?
Unfortunately, you are correct. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter was cut by NASA in 2005. Another joint mission between ESA and NASA, along with JAXA and Roscosmos, the Europa Jupiter System Mission was also cut in 2011. JUICE is the latest attempt to send a mission to Jupiter's moons.
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SwRI: Ultraviolet Instrument Delivered for JUICE

Post by bystander » Wed Feb 26, 2020 3:31 am

Ultraviolet Instrument Delivered for ESA's Jupiter Mission
Southwest Research Institute | JUICE-UVS | 2020 Feb 25
An ultraviolet spectrograph (UVS) designed and built by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is the first scientific instrument to be delivered for integration onto the European Space Agency’s Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE) spacecraft. Scheduled to launch in 2022 and arrive at Jupiter in 2030, JUICE will spend at least three years making detailed observations in the Jovian system before going into orbit around the solar system’s largest moon, Ganymede.

Aboard JUICE, UVS will get close-up views of the Galilean moons Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, all thought to host liquid water beneath their icy surfaces. UVS will record ultraviolet light emitted, transmitted and reflected by these bodies, revealing the composition of their surfaces and tenuous atmospheres and how they interact with Jupiter and its giant magnetosphere. ...

UVS will be one of 10 science instruments and 11 investigations for the JUICE mission. The mission has overarching goals of investigating potentially habitable worlds around the gas giant, as well as, studying the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants in our solar system and beyond. ...
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Re: ESA: JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE)

Post by Ann » Wed Feb 26, 2020 10:51 am

How I wish there was an ultraviolet instrument that would look at galaxies and not just at the Sun and the Solar system!

GALEX, come back!

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