APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.

APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby APOD Robot » Fri Aug 26, 2011 4:06 am

Image A Young Supernova in the Nearby Pinwheel Galaxy

Explanation: A nearby star has exploded and telescopes all over the world are turning to monitor it. The supernova, dubbed PTF 11kly, was discovered by computer only two days ago as part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) sky survey utilizing the wide angle 1.2-meter Samuel Oschwin Telescope in California. Its rapid recovery makes it one of the supernovas caught most soon after ignition. PTF 11kly occurred in the photogenic Pinwheel galaxy (M101), which, being only about 21 million light years away, makes it one of the closest supernovas seen in decades. Rapid follow up observations have already given a clear indication that PTF 11kly is a Type Ia supernova, a type of white dwarf detonation that usually progresses in such a standard manner than it has helped to calibrate the expansion history of the entire universe. Studying such a close and young Type Ia event, however, may yield new and unique clues. If early indications are correct, PTF 11kly should brighten to about visual magnitude 10 in the coming weeks, making it possible to monitor with even moderately sized telescopes.

<< Previous APODDiscuss Any APOD Next APOD >>
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
 
Posts: 1711
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby Beyond » Fri Aug 26, 2011 4:45 am

An APOD from a two day old event. It can't hardly get any more up-to-date, or fresher than that!
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond
User avatar
Beyond
Milliways Pundit
 
Posts: 6101
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:09 am
Location: BEYONDER LAND

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby Ann » Fri Aug 26, 2011 4:52 am

Please note the blue color of the supernova, typical of supernovae of type Ia. Bear in mind, too, that the galaxy, M101, is itself very blue as galaxies go.

Ann
Color Commentator
User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
 
Posts: 5401
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby Joe Stieber » Fri Aug 26, 2011 5:01 am

It's the Palomar Transient (not Transit) Factory.
User avatar
Joe Stieber
Ensign
 
Posts: 59
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 1:41 pm
Location: Maple Shade, NJ

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby bystander » Fri Aug 26, 2011 6:58 am

I don't imagine you will dispute the fact that at present the stupid people
are in an absolutely overwhelming majority all the world over.
— Henrik Ibsen
User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
 
Posts: 11942
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby Ann » Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:11 am

I should have added that this is a brilliant APOD. Talk about being up to date and aware of the latest developments! Where is the clap,clap, clap smilie?

Ann
Color Commentator
User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
 
Posts: 5401
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby biddie67 » Fri Aug 26, 2011 11:05 am

This is a really interesting APOD with great links! Congratulations to the PTF network!

Is the designation of "PTF 11kly" a permanent label? How did the "kly" part get added to the label - does it have any particular meaning other than possibly the order in which the SN was discovered?
biddie67
Science Officer
 
Posts: 483
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 9:44 am
Location: Possum Hollow, NW Florida

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby orin stepanek » Fri Aug 26, 2011 1:16 pm

Wow! you can't even see the star before the Nova! 8-) I loved the video! :D 8-)
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!
User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
 
Posts: 4175
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby kaigun » Fri Aug 26, 2011 2:40 pm

biddie67 wrote:Is the designation of "PTF 11kly" a permanent label? How did the "kly" part get added to the label - does it have any particular meaning other than possibly the order in which the SN was discovered?


I keep reading it as "likely".
User avatar
kaigun
Ensign
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:17 pm

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby Chris Peterson » Fri Aug 26, 2011 2:58 pm

biddie67 wrote:Is the designation of "PTF 11kly" a permanent label? How did the "kly" part get added to the label - does it have any particular meaning other than possibly the order in which the SN was discovered?

The formal IAU designation (using the normal nomenclature) is SN 2011fe. The early name of PTF 11kly was simply a temporary designation, presumably using an internal system of the Palomar Transient Factory.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com
User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
 
Posts: 8737
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby Ayiomamitis » Fri Aug 26, 2011 10:37 pm

Credit: Anthony Ayiomamitis
Source: http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-DSO-Superno ... 110826.htm



Using differential photometry, I have a mean estimate for the magnitude of 13.290 (+/- 0.003) using GSC 3852:1108 (mag 11.7) and GSC 3852:1069 (mag 11.9) as comparison and check stars, respectively.

Please note that the magnitude estimates for these two stars are accurate to a single decimal digit and which makes my estimate (13.290) slightly questionable.

Ursa Major is rather low in the sky and I went after M101 about 15 minutes before official darkness (for whatever its worth).

Anthony.
Anthony Ayiomamitis
http://www.perseus.gr
Ayiomamitis
Ensign
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2004 3:32 pm
Location: Athens, Greece

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby Ayiomamitis » Sat Aug 27, 2011 12:22 am

Ayiomamitis wrote:Using differential photometry, I have a mean estimate for the magnitude of 13.290 (+/- 0.003) using GSC 3852:1108 (mag 11.7) and GSC 3852:1069 (mag 11.9) as comparison and check stars, respectively.


According to AAVSO Alert Notice 446, we have:

Aug 26.1965 - mag 13.4
Aug 26.8747 - mag 13.118

Aug 26.7708 - mag 13.290 (my estimate from above) and perfectly in line with the reported magnitudes from the AAVSO bulletin.
Anthony Ayiomamitis
http://www.perseus.gr
Ayiomamitis
Ensign
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2004 3:32 pm
Location: Athens, Greece

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby DavidLeodis » Sat Aug 27, 2011 11:01 am

In the credit to this APOD it names 'B J Fulton' and that he/she is apparently connected with the LCOGT but there is no direct link to any further information on him/her. I think it is interesting to know a bit more about the people named in APODs so I checked the LCOGT website where I found that there was no B J Fulton listed under the LCOGT staff. However, in a report about the supernova in the website I came across this "We were very lucky that BJ Fulton, another member of the LCOGT astronomy team was able to stay up into the small hours of the Californian night to snap some vital and early observations of PTF 11kly". Seeing that B J Fulton was considered valued enough to be named in the credit to the APOD I find it odd that he/she is not listed under the LCOGT staff. Perhaps there is a privacy reason.

The detection of the supernova so early on is fascinating.
User avatar
DavidLeodis
A Tiger Named Lion
 
Posts: 721
Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 1:00 pm

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby biddie67 » Sat Aug 27, 2011 12:20 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
biddie67 wrote:Is the designation of "PTF 11kly" a permanent label? How did the "kly" part get added to the label - does it have any particular meaning other than possibly the order in which the SN was discovered?

The formal IAU designation (using the normal nomenclature) is SN 2011fe. The early name of PTF 11kly was simply a temporary designation, presumably using an internal system of the Palomar Transient Factory.


Thanks, Chris. Doing a google search on the IAU that you mentioned above (i.e., iau naming conventions), I found a couple of websites that explained the naming pattern.
biddie67
Science Officer
 
Posts: 483
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 9:44 am
Location: Possum Hollow, NW Florida

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby wolf kotenberg » Sat Aug 27, 2011 7:33 pm

I have a question. When a bomb goes off here on the ground, an explosion is defined by a pressure wave traveling at a specific speed or above. What does an explosion in space " feel like " ?
wolf kotenberg
 

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby neufer » Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:31 pm

wolf kotenberg wrote:
When a bomb goes off here on the ground, an explosion is defined by a pressure wave traveling at a specific speed or above. What does an explosion in space " feel like " ?

Heat....and radiation (like the victims of Hiroshima felt).
Art Neuendorffer
User avatar
neufer
Abstruse Allusion Artificer
 
Posts: 11395
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby ssgeo » Wed Aug 31, 2011 1:08 pm

After seeing the APOD of the newest supernova a few days ago, I wondered why we only see them on rare occasions. Surely, with the billions upon billions of stars out there in the visible universe, one would think we would see more occurring regularly, like flashbulbs at a rock concert. Why do they seem such rare events?
ssgeo
 

Re: APOD: A Young Supernova in the Nearby... (2011 Aug 26)

Postby Chris Peterson » Wed Aug 31, 2011 2:08 pm

ssgeo wrote:After seeing the APOD of the newest supernova a few days ago, I wondered why we only see them on rare occasions. Surely, with the billions upon billions of stars out there in the visible universe, one would think we would see more occurring regularly, like flashbulbs at a rock concert. Why do they seem such rare events?

We see a few hundred a year- as events in the Universe they aren't that rare. In a large galaxy with active star formation, like the Milky Way, you might have a supernova every few decades. What attracts attention in a case like this is that the supernova is nearby.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com
User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
 
Posts: 8737
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Colorado, USA


Return to The Bridge: Discuss an Astronomy Picture of the Day

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Ahrefs [Bot], BDanielMayfield, CommonCrawl [Bot], Google Mobile [Bot], Yandex Browser, Youdao [Bot] and 17 guests