APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

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APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby APOD Robot » Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:07 am

Image Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star

Explanation: Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star. About 7,000 years ago that star exploded in a supernova leaving the Veil Nebula. At the time, the expanding cloud was likely as bright as a crescent Moon, remaining visible for weeks to people living at the dawn of recorded history. Today, the resulting supernova remnant, also known as the Cygnus Loop, has faded and is now visible only through a small telescope directed toward the constellation of the Swan (Cygnus). The remaining Veil Nebula is physically huge, however, and even though it lies about 1,400 light-years distant, it covers over five times the size of the full Moon. The featured picture is a Hubble Space Telescope mosaic of six images together covering a span of only about two light years, a small part of the expansive supernova remnant. In images of the complete Veil Nebula, even studious readers might not be able to identify the featured filaments.

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Chris Peterson » Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:36 am

Useful additional information.

Chris

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Boomer12k » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:23 am

Outstanding close up...

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby sallyseaver » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:43 am

I agree --- Outstanding closeup!
Wow!

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby sallyseaver » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:46 am

It looks like a plasma to me with multi-element ionized gas.

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby sallyseaver » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:49 am

Chris, thanks for the extra info. You provided the colors for the different elements in the plasma and a scale for the image.

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby neufer » Tue Sep 19, 2017 1:25 pm

.
    King Henry VI, part III : Act II, scene II
EDWARD: A wisp of straw were worth a thousand crowns,
    To make this shameless callet know herself.
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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Mtnrockdhh » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:18 pm

The left tip of the Witch's Broom?

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Guest » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:19 pm

Mtnrockdhh wrote:The north (left) tip of the Witch's Broom?

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby bystander » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:23 pm

Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Rules For » Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:43 pm

Does anybody know what's happened to Hubble Heritage? They used to put out a new image every month, but it's been awhile.

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Ann » Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:55 pm

Vela supernova remnant. Photo: Robert Gendler.





















As supernova remnants go, the Veil Nebula is fairly bright and easy to photograph. Note in the picture at left the Veil Nebula at 7 o'clock.

Personally I find the Vela supernova remnant more beautiful than the Veil Nebula. The Vela SNR is located in a rich region of star formation and young stars, whereas the background of the Veil is made up of mostly old stars.

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby MarkBour » Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:15 pm

APOD Robot wrote: ... Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star.

When today's APOD says "visible", I think they are distinguishing this easy-to-see material from the hard-to-see central X-ray source, Cygnus X-1 ... which is widely believed to be a stellar mass black hole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cygnus_X-1.
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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Ann » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:06 pm

MarkBour wrote:
APOD Robot wrote: ... Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star.

When today's APOD says "visible", I think they are distinguishing this easy-to-see material from the hard-to-see central X-ray source, Cygnus X-1 ... which is widely believed to be a stellar mass black hole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cygnus_X-1.


Cygnus X-1 and the Tulip Nebula.
Photo: Neil Fleming.
Please note that Cygnus X-1 is not the central source, X-ray or otherwise, of the Veil Nebula. (Is there a lot of X-rays in the Veil Nebula?)

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby ta152h0 » Tue Sep 19, 2017 7:02 pm

This star must have been in the tunnel of love, or riding in the Pirates of the Caribean, at Disneyland
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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Thwapwhacket » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:24 pm

Is there an explanation for the slightly darker horizontal band just above the center of the image?

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Case » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:32 pm

Ann wrote:Is there a lot of X-rays in the Veil Nebula?

ROSAT found quite a lot of emission!

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby bjmb » Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:29 pm

splendid picture, but somewhat sloppy caption> 'Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star. About 7,000 years ago that star exploded in a supernova leaving the Veil Nebula. At the time, the expanding cloud was likely as bright as a crescent Moon, remaining visible for weeks to people living at the dawn of recorded history.' scientifically exact would be: 'Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star. About 7,000 years ago that star's explosion in a supernova became visible on earth, leaving the Veil Nebula. At the time, the expanding cloud was likely as bright as a crescent Moon, remaining visible for weeks to people living at the dawn of recorded history.' the explosion itself was of course dusted and done 7,000 years ago

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Chris Peterson » Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:11 pm

bjmb wrote:splendid picture, but somewhat sloppy caption> 'Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star. About 7,000 years ago that star exploded in a supernova leaving the Veil Nebula. At the time, the expanding cloud was likely as bright as a crescent Moon, remaining visible for weeks to people living at the dawn of recorded history.' scientifically exact would be: 'Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star. About 7,000 years ago that star's explosion in a supernova became visible on earth, leaving the Veil Nebula. At the time, the expanding cloud was likely as bright as a crescent Moon, remaining visible for weeks to people living at the dawn of recorded history.' the explosion itself was of course dusted and done 7,000 years ago

No, the way it's worded is fine. We don't care when the explosion "actually" happened. What is relevant is when the light reached Earth. This is almost always true, and almost always the way things are dated astronomically. It is normal to treat the date of occurrence as the date of observation.
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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby neufer » Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:46 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
We don't care when the explosion "actually" happened. What is relevant is when the light reached Earth. This is almost always true, and almost always the way things are dated astronomically. It is normal to treat the date of occurrence as the date of observation.

It's not that we don't care...
it's simply that we don't know precisely when the explosion "actually" happened.

Hence, we'll just call the accurately known spacetime interval Δs "the time":
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spacetime wrote:
In four-dimensional spacetime, the analog to distance is the spacetime interval Δs:


The spacetime interval Δs between any two events is independent
of the inertial frame of reference in which they are recorded.
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Chris Peterson » Tue Sep 19, 2017 11:33 pm

neufer wrote:
Chris Peterson wrote:
We don't care when the explosion "actually" happened. What is relevant is when the light reached Earth. This is almost always true, and almost always the way things are dated astronomically. It is normal to treat the date of occurrence as the date of observation.

It's not that we don't care...
it's simply that we don't know precisely when the explosion "actually" happened.

Sometimes. But it's true that we most often don't care at all, because the information isn't of any use. We're usually observing the evolution of some event, and an offset from when we observe it is constant, and therefore irrelevant.

There are exceptions for things observed at cosmological distances. But not typically for things observed in our own or nearby galaxies.
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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby groelofs » Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:07 am

Looks like it's where my best guess was, but the misleading wording on the nebula's size ("covers over five times the size of the full Moon") made it uncertain. I believe the intended wording is that the diameter is about five times that of the full Moon, which would make the overall nebula about about 61 light years across. As actually worded, however, it sounds like the area is five times that of the Moon, which would imply a diameter of about 27 light years, I think.

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby geckzilla » Wed Sep 20, 2017 4:12 am

Rules For wrote:Does anybody know what's happened to Hubble Heritage? They used to put out a new image every month, but it's been awhile.

I asked a few months back, and didn't get a reply. They're prepping for JWST over at STScI. ESA still publishes a new image every week or so over at spacetelescope.org.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby MarkBour » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:44 pm

Ann wrote:
MarkBour wrote:
APOD Robot wrote: ... Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star.

When today's APOD says "visible", I think they are distinguishing this easy-to-see material from the hard-to-see central X-ray source, Cygnus X-1 ... which is widely believed to be a stellar mass black hole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cygnus_X-1.


Cygnus X-1 and the Tulip Nebula.
Photo: Neil Fleming.
Please note that Cygnus X-1 is not the central source, X-ray or otherwise, of the Veil Nebula. (Is there a lot of X-rays in the Veil Nebula?)

Ann

If Cygnus X-1 is in the wrong location, then is there another black hole in about the right place? Cygnus X-5, perhaps?
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Re: APOD: Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star (2017 Sep 19)

Postby Ann » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:56 am

MarkBour wrote:
If Cygnus X-1 is in the wrong location, then is there another black hole in about the right place? Cygnus X-5, perhaps?


Yes, it would seem that Cygnus X-5 is the X-ray source of the Cygnus Loop with the Veil Nebula.

Wikipedia wrote:

The X-ray source Cygnus X-5 coincides with SNR G074.0-08.6 (the Cygnus Loop), located at J2000 RA 20h 51.1m Dec +30° 41′, observed by Uhuru at 4U 2046+31. This source also has catalogue numbers 1E 2049.4+3050, 1H 2050+310, and 1M 2051+309, having been observed by the Einstein Observatory, HEAO 1, and OSO 7, respectively.
The Cygnus Loop is a strong source of soft X-rays.


But nothing seems to be known about Cygnus X-5. Wikipedia does not provide a link to more information about Cygnus X-5. So we can't say that Cygnus X-5 is a black hole.

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