APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

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APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby APOD Robot » Fri Sep 29, 2017 4:06 am

Image Puppis A Supernova Remnant

Explanation: Driven by the explosion of a massive star, supernova remnant Puppis A is blasting into the surrounding interstellar medium about 7,000 light-years away. At that distance, this colorful telescopic field based on broadband and narrowband optical image data is about 60 light-years across. As the supernova remnant (upper right) expands into its clumpy, non-uniform surroundings, shocked filaments of oxygen atoms glow in green-blue hues. Hydrogen and nitrogen are in red. Light from the initial supernova itself, triggered by the collapse of the massive star's core, would have reached Earth about 3,700 years ago. The Puppis A remnant is actually seen through outlying emission from the closer but more ancient Vela supernova remnant, near the crowded plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Still glowing across the electromagnetic spectrum Puppis A remains one of the brightest sources in the X-ray sky.

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby Boomer12k » Fri Sep 29, 2017 6:10 am

Awwwe.... it had PUPPIES....

Blue-Green for Oxygen.... Crikies, that's a lot of Oxygen, mate...

Are you sure it isn't Angry Birds???


Well, got out the scope for probably the last night this year. Been having problems with Dark Frames with the Celestron Evolution 6. It darkens the whole image! Not just the heat speckles. So, I fiddled with the Long Exposure setting and Gain and Offset... and I got a fair image, and we shall see how it processes... did M27, something I am familiar with...over in the Cafe see...My M27 test with Celestron Evolution 6, by Boomer12k...

So this is a supernova remnant through a supernova remnant.... sweet....
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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby ta152h0 » Fri Sep 29, 2017 8:48 am

is the Universe we are exploring a Big Bang remnant ?
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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby starsurfer » Fri Sep 29, 2017 10:14 am

An excellent image of an obscure object! Don Goldman should do more southern supernova remnants. Marco Lorenzi has an image here, which shows all of Puppis A. Don Goldman should do another closeup with the northern part.

On a completely unrelated note, Don Goldman will be presenting at the Advanced Imaging Conference this week!

heehaw

Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby heehaw » Fri Sep 29, 2017 1:20 pm

ta152h0 wrote:is the Universe we are exploring a Big Bang remnant ?

Yes and no.

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby Chris Peterson » Fri Sep 29, 2017 1:47 pm

Boomer12k wrote:Been having problems with Dark Frames with the Celestron Evolution 6. It darkens the whole image! Not just the heat speckles.

Dark frames increase the amount of thermal noise in the final image. They can never reduce it. No calibration process removes noise. Dark frames remove fixed patterns and background offsets.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby MaryE » Fri Sep 29, 2017 2:29 pm

If light from the supernova would have reached Earth 3,700 years ago, how is it that the remnant is 7000 light years away? I didn't think the Universe was expanding that rapidly - or is it?

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby Chris Peterson » Fri Sep 29, 2017 2:44 pm

MaryE wrote:If light from the supernova would have reached Earth 3,700 years ago, how is it that the remnant is 7000 light years away? I didn't think the Universe was expanding that rapidly - or is it?

It doesn't matter how far away it is. It could have been a million light years away and what matters is when it would have been observed. As we're seeing it, the supernova happened 3,700 years ago. Another way of thinking about it is to recognize that the remnant we're seeing is what a supernova looks like 3,700 years after occurring. Like seeing a photograph of yourself as a child. You say "I'm five years old in that picture" without worrying that the picture was taken 50 years ago.

There is no universal expansion at all between us and the supernova remnant.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby neufer » Fri Sep 29, 2017 2:54 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RX_J0822-4300 wrote:
<<RX J0822-4300, often referred to as a "Cosmic Cannonball", is a radio-quiet neutron star currently moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant at over 3 million miles per hour (5 400 000 km/h; 1500 km/s; ~0.5% the speed of light), making it one of the fastest moving stars ever found. Astronomers used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to observe the star over a period of five years to determine its speed. At this velocity the star will be ejected from the galaxy millions of years from now.

Although the cosmic cannonball is not the only hypervelocity star discovered, it is unique in the apparent origin of its speed. Others may have derived theirs from a gravitational slingshot around the Milky Way's suspected supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*. Current theories fail to explain how such speeds can be attained from a supernova explosion. It could be a possible quark star.

However, a more recent analysis by the same group yielded a more modest recoil velocity of 672±115 km/s which is much less problematic theoretically.>>
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby sunson » Fri Sep 29, 2017 3:05 pm

ta152h0 wrote:is the Universe we are exploring a Big Bang remnant ?


Great concept!

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby neufer » Fri Sep 29, 2017 3:27 pm

sunson wrote:
ta152h0 wrote:
is the Universe we are exploring a Big Bang remnant ?

Great concept!
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?all ... ch=remnant wrote:
remnant (n.) late 14c., contraction of remenant (c. 1300), from Old French remanant "rest, remainder, surplus," noun use of present participle of remanoir "to remain". Specific sense of "end of a piece of drapery, cloth, etc." is recorded from early 15c. An Old English word for "remnant" was endlaf. :lol2:
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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby De58te » Fri Sep 29, 2017 5:55 pm

MaryE wrote:If light from the supernova would have reached Earth 3,700 years ago, how is it that the remnant is 7000 light years away? I didn't think the Universe was expanding that rapidly - or is it?

If I may add to the Honorable Chris Peterson comment. Light travels at a fixed speed in the vacuum of space if you remember your physics. If light from the supernova reached Earth 3,700 years ago, and the original star was 7,000 light years away then that light took 7,000 years on its journey here to Earth. So the explosion really happened 10,700 years ago in that star system (if anybody had been alive there to see it firsthand), but we on Earth between 10,700 years ago and 3,700 years ago would have seen nothing but the star shining in its prime.

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby Chris Peterson » Fri Sep 29, 2017 6:02 pm

De58te wrote:
MaryE wrote:If light from the supernova would have reached Earth 3,700 years ago, how is it that the remnant is 7000 light years away? I didn't think the Universe was expanding that rapidly - or is it?

If I may add to the Honorable Chris Peterson comment. Light travels at a fixed speed in the vacuum of space if you remember your physics. If light from the supernova reached Earth 3,700 years ago, and the original star was 7,000 light years away then that light took 7,000 years on its journey here to Earth. So the explosion really happened 10,700 years ago in that star system (if anybody had been alive there to see it firsthand), but we on Earth between 10,700 years ago and 3,700 years ago would have seen nothing but the star shining in its prime.

Well, probably a bit past its prime in those last few thousand years!
Chris

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby MargaritaMc » Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:27 pm

By pure chance I came across this video on YouTube of astrophysicist Brian Greene talking with Stephen Colbert (yes, that Stephen Colbert!) about supernovae. With a rather fun demo. I thought it might be of interest with this Apod.
Brian Greene Explains The Most Powerful Explosions In The Universe - YouTube
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby Brit_in_Exile » Fri Sep 29, 2017 8:15 pm

Never ceases to amaze me when APOD throws in a line like "60 light years across". That's about 15x bigger than our Solar system which in turn means we would probably be totally unaware of it if we were in the middle of it.

I wonder what was here during the 9 - 10 Billion years before our sun formed ? I guess some bigger suns which supernova'd to produce the materials we are made of.........but anybody got better guesses (backed up by evidence)

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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby neufer » Fri Sep 29, 2017 10:43 pm

Brit_in_Exile wrote:
Never ceases to amaze me when APOD throws in a line like "60 light years across". That's about 15x bigger than our Solar system which in turn means we would probably be totally unaware of it if we were in the middle of it.

Chris doesn't care how far away it is. "It could have been a million light years away."
    So, I guess, he doesn't care how big it is. (It could be 6000 light years across.)
Chris Peterson wrote:
It doesn't matter how far away it is. It could have been a million light years away and what matters is when it would have been observed.

Brit_in_Exile wrote:
I wonder what was here during the 9 - 10 Billion years before our sun formed ? I guess some bigger suns which supernova'd to produce the materials we are made of.........but anybody got better guesses (backed up by evidence)

The Sun formed about 4.6 billion years ago so: The Big Bang.
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Re: APOD: Puppis A Supernova Remnant (2017 Sep 29)

Postby Chris Peterson » Fri Sep 29, 2017 11:53 pm

neufer wrote:
Brit_in_Exile wrote:
Never ceases to amaze me when APOD throws in a line like "60 light years across". That's about 15x bigger than our Solar system which in turn means we would probably be totally unaware of it if we were in the middle of it.

Chris doesn't care how far away it is. "It could have been a million light years away."
    So, I guess, he doesn't care how big it is. (It could be 6000 light years across.)

I'm pretty sure you're capable of figuring out the context of that comment. Pretty sure.
Chris

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