APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

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APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

Post by APOD Robot » Sun May 12, 2019 4:10 am

Image Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic Volcano

Explanation: Why did a picturesque volcanic eruption in Iceland create so much ash? Although the large ash plume was not unparalleled in its abundance, its location was particularly noticeable because it drifted across such well-populated areas. The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in southern Iceland began erupting on 2010 March 20, with a second eruption starting under the center of a small glacier on 2010 April 14. Neither eruption was unusually powerful. The second eruption, however, melted a large amount of glacial ice which then cooled and fragmented lava into gritty glass particles that were carried up with the rising volcanic plume. Pictured here during the second eruption, lightning bolts illuminate ash pouring out of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano.

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orin stepanek
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Re: APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

Post by orin stepanek » Sun May 12, 2019 11:30 am

I know it's a repeat; but these volcano photos are always awesome! 8-)
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Re: APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

Post by BDanielMayfield » Sun May 12, 2019 7:15 pm

orin stepanek wrote:
Sun May 12, 2019 11:30 am
I know it's a repeat; but these volcano photos are always awesome! 8-)
A comment worth repeating Orin. Magnificent display of destructive/creative power!
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Re: APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

Post by BDanielMayfield » Sun May 12, 2019 7:23 pm

An interesting example dust reddening a light source can be seen in the lightning bolts inside as opposed to the ones outside the column of volcanic ash.

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orin stepanek
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Re: APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

Post by orin stepanek » Mon May 13, 2019 11:05 am

I can see why the anciets looked at them as angrt Gods! :wink:
Orin

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Eyjafjallajökull

Post by neufer » Mon May 13, 2019 2:13 pm

orin stepanek wrote:
Mon May 13, 2019 11:05 am

I can see why the anciets looked at them as angrt Gods! :wink:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life wrote:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
<<There is currently no consensus regarding the definition of life. One popular definition is that organisms are open systems that maintain homeostasis, are composed of cells, have a life cycle, undergo metabolism, can grow, adapt to their environment, respond to stimuli, reproduce and evolve.

Abiogenesis is the natural process of life arising from non-living matter, such as simple organic compounds. The prevailing scientific hypothesis is that the transition from non-living to living entities was not a single event, but a gradual process of increasing complexity. Life on Earth first appeared as early as 4.28 billion years ago, soon after ocean formation 4.41 billion years ago, and not long after the formation of the Earth 4.54 billion years ago. The earliest known life forms are microfossils of bacteria. Researchers generally think that current life on Earth descends from an RNA world, although RNA-based life may not have been the first life to have existed. The classic 1952 Miller–Urey experiment and similar research demonstrated that most amino acids, the chemical constituents of the proteins used in all living organisms, can be synthesized from inorganic compounds under conditions intended to replicate those of the early Earth. Complex organic molecules occur in the Solar System and in interstellar space, and these molecules may have provided starting material for the development of life on Earth.

Since its primordial beginnings, life on Earth has changed its environment on a geologic time scale, but it has also adapted to survive in most ecosystems and conditions. Death is the permanent termination of all biological functions which sustain an organism, and as such, is the end of its life.>>
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Re: APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

Post by orin stepanek » Mon May 13, 2019 5:58 pm

Thanks Art! I Think! :mrgreen: IT'S SUPPOSED TO THUNDER TONIGHT! :shock: much to my dog's displeasure! :cry:
Orin

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Re: APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

Post by neufer » Mon May 13, 2019 6:42 pm

orin stepanek wrote:
Mon May 13, 2019 5:58 pm

Thanks Art! I Think! :mrgreen: IT'S SUPPOSED TO THUNDER TONIGHT! :shock: much to my dog's displeasure! :cry:
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/04/animals-pets-summer-storms-weather/ wrote:
Why Your Dog Freaks Out During Thunderstorms—And What to Do
By Liz Langley, National Geographic, April 28, 2018

<<Summer weather is just around the corner—and with it thunderstorms that may freak out your dog. We looked into what causes this anxiety, and how to soothe their rainy-day feelings. Signs of anxiousness in dogs are "ears back, tails down, eyes wide, panting, lip-licking and yawning," says Terry Curtis, a clinical behaviorist at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. Sometimes, their panic escalates to dangerous levels during thunderstorms. "I've had cases where the dog has dug through walls, all the way through the drywall," Curtis says. "Another dog jumped through a sliding glass door."
So what gives?

Dropping barometric pressure—which dogs can sense—coupled with darkening skies, wind, and the sheer noise of thunder can cause fearful reactions in dogs. Some dogs have canine noise aversion, which can make them uncomfortable or even phobic about loud sounds.

Static buildup in their fur is another likely explanation, says Nicholas Dodman, a veterinary behaviorist at Tufts University and chief scientific officer at the Center for Canine Behavior Studies. Large dogs and those with long or double coats easily build up static electricity, the way we do when we wear a sweater and get a shock from the car door if we're not wearing rubber-soled shoes, he says. A dog already nervous during storms may get another shock when touching its nose to a metal object. Then mild discomfort could escalate to full-on phobia, Dodman says.

Kelly Ballyntyne, clinical assistant professor at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, says that it's difficult to test whether static buildup causes anxiety in dogs. Our canines' incredible noses may "just be smelling changes in the environment that predict a storm is coming," she says. In addition, "there's a little bit of evidence that there can be some genetic predispositions for animals to develop noise phobia," such as border collies and Australian shepherds.

While treating storm-phobic dogs, Dodman noticed that many canines seek out hiding places grounded against electric shocks, such as bathtubs, jacuzzis, or behind the toilet tank. Curious about this odd behavior, he started informally asking owners where their dogs hide, and half of them said the bathroom. One 80-pound German shepherd even jumps into the sink, he says. Curtis and Dodman both recommend owners buy a anti-static jacket to keep the dog calm, and Dodman adds that rubbing them down with an anti-static dryer sheet also helps. Snug-fitting wraps can also be comforting.

Ballyntyne suggests dog owners videotape their dog while away to look for signs such as pacing, panting, and restlessness. These behaviors could reveal mild separation anxiety that's exacerbated by storms. She also advises letting the animal decide where it feels safe, and then making that area more comfortable by adding white-noise machines—to buffer the noise of thunder—or acoustic tiling for soundproofing. And all the experts agreed that a veterinarian can prescribe medication if needed. "If the dog is panicked," Ballantyne says, anti-anxiety medication "will go a long way to improve that dog's quality of life.">>
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Re: APOD: Ash and Lightning above an Icelandic... (2019 May 12)

Post by orin stepanek » Tue May 14, 2019 3:02 am

She's always been that way! She was on her own before we got her! Little by little she is getting better. :shock:
Orin

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