APOD: Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse (2019 Jul 09)

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APOD Robot
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APOD: Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse (2019 Jul 09)

Post by APOD Robot » Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:08 am

Image Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse

Explanation: What do birds do during a total solar eclipse? Darkness descends more quickly in a total eclipse than during sunset, but returns just as quickly -- and perhaps unexpectedly to the avians -- just a few minutes later. Stories about the unusual behavior of birds during eclipses have been told for centuries, but bird reactions were recorded and studied systematically by citizen scientists participating in an eBird project during the total solar eclipse that crossed the USA in 2017 August. Although some unusual behaviors were observed, many observers noted birds acting like it was dusk and either landing or flying low to the ground. Radar confirmed a significant decrease in high-flying birds and insects during and just after totality. Conversely, several sightings of normally nocturnal birds were reported. Pictured, a flock of birds in La Serena, Chile flew through the air together during the total solar eclipse that crossed South America last week. The photographer captured the scene in frames from an eclipse video. The next total solar eclipse in 2020 December will also cross South America, while in 2024 April a total solar eclipse will cross North America from Mexico through New England, USA.

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Boomer12k
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Re: APOD: Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse (2019 Jul 09)

Post by Boomer12k » Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:34 am

Awesome....they probably had a great view...

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orin stepanek
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Re: APOD: Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse (2019 Jul 09)

Post by orin stepanek » Tue Jul 09, 2019 12:06 pm

Hey birdies; The moon's too long of a flight; and there's no power lines to rest on along the way! :lol2: :b:
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

Avalon

Re: APOD: Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse (2019 Jul 09)

Post by Avalon » Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:05 pm

Was the sun particularly low in the sky during the eclipse in South America? Otherwise these birds indeed would have been flying upward at an unusual angle.

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neufer
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Re: APOD: Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse (2019 Jul 09)

Post by neufer » Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:44 pm




Avalon wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:05 pm

Was the sun particularly low in the sky during the eclipse in South America? Otherwise these birds indeed would have been flying upward at an unusual angle.
Yes, low sunset in NW.
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse (2019 Jul 09)

Post by LoneStarG84 » Wed Jul 10, 2019 4:27 am

I was at a park in the path of totality during the 2017 eclipse, and all the crickets started chirping like it was twilight. That was an incredible experience, and luckily I won't have to go far for 2024's!

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neufer
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Re: APOD: Birds During a Total Solar Eclipse (2019 Jul 09)

Post by neufer » Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:44 pm

LoneStarG84 wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 4:27 am

I was at a park in the path of totality during the 2017 eclipse, and all the crickets started chirping like it was twilight. That was an incredible experience, and luckily I won't have to go far for 2024's!
  • Was it crickets or frogs?
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/what-does-an-eclipse-sound-like-in-1963-we-found-out/ wrote:
What Does an Eclipse Sound Like? In 1963, We Found Out
By Marc Devokaitis, August 18, 2017

<<“The shades of night which accompany an eclipse of the sun have always intrigued mankind and caused him to pause, if only for a moment, to contemplate the mystery, the magic, the grandeur, and the extent of the universe of which he is a part.”

That’s the kind of sentiment that is drawing thousands of people to the path of the 2017 eclipse—but the words were written in 1963, by Peter Paul Kellogg, a professor of ornithology and bioacoustics at Cornell. And it’s what drew him to Maine for that year’s total eclipse, at 5:30 p.m. on July 20. Many people had come to Maine to see the eclipse, but Kellogg was there to listen, and to record bird songs.

“The eclipse does not influence many of the factors which affect bird song such as time of year and the physiological condition of the bird,” he wrote in the 1963 issue of The Living Bird. “It is also probable that the sudden interruption of an established diurnal routine is more confusing to some species or individuals than others. All these possibilities for variation in cause and effect…tend to keep the value of any observation a strictly local affair.”

“As the darkness descended, bird song fell off noticeably but some species, according to our recordings, never did stop completely.” he wrote. “The per-chic-o-ree of the Goldfinch was heard clearly in the middle of the totality; the Hermit Thrush and Swainson’s Thrush sang weakly during the darkness; a Veery called.” Despite the short period of darkness—about twice the brightness of a full moon, he wrote—no Eastern Whip-poor-wills took the opportunity to sing. After the light returned, the first call was a spring peeper (frog), and then a White-throated Sparrow, a Hermit Thrush, and a Swainson’s Thrush.>>
Art Neuendorffer