APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

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APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by APOD Robot » Mon Sep 02, 2019 4:08 am

Image The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps

Explanation: What are those bright lights in the sky ahead? When hiking a high mountain pass in northern Italy three weeks ago, a conjunction between our Moon and the distant planet Jupiter was visible toward the south just after sunset. The picturesque mountains in the distance are Tre Cime di Lavaredo (Three Peaks of Lavaredo), a UNESCO World Heritage Site and three of the best known mountain peaks in Italy, the Dolomites, and the entire Alps. In the foreground on the left is Locatelli Hut, a refuge for tired hikers as it is located over an hour from nearest parking lot. The bright sky object on the upper left is Saturn. The entire scene was captured on a single 8-second exposure. Jupiter and Saturn will remain prominent in the western sky after sunset this month, while the Moon, in its monthly orbit around the Earth, will pass near Jupiter again in about four days.

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StuartS

Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by StuartS » Mon Sep 02, 2019 6:38 am

The description says that the Moon and Jupiter rose together in the southwest after sunset. I don't think that it is possible for the Moon or any of the planets to rise the southwest. Oops!

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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by Boomer12k » Mon Sep 02, 2019 10:12 am

StuartS wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 6:38 am
The description says that the Moon and Jupiter rose together in the southwest after sunset. I don't think that it is possible for the Moon or any of the planets to rise the southwest. Oops!
I was going to comment the same... they ROSE in the east, long before Sunset...they were..."nearer the southwestern horizon after sunset"... or so...and as evening progress... Set themselves. Or maybe "...appeared in the southwestern sky after sunset..." would be better still...

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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by Boomer12k » Mon Sep 02, 2019 10:14 am

Great image... despite the description...

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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by BDanielMayfield » Mon Sep 02, 2019 11:04 am

Nice Apod. As to tomorrow's:
Tomorrow's picture: black hole vs neutron star
Don't bet against the black hole.
"Happy are the peaceable ... "

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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by heehaw » Mon Sep 02, 2019 11:24 am

https://epod.usra.edu/blog/
Why are they called the Alps? It is because hundreds of years ago, a party of English explorers got lost in those mountains.
They say you can still sometimes hear them calling: 'alp! 'alp!

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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by neufer » Mon Sep 02, 2019 12:08 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Moon_and_Sixpence wrote:

<<The Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W. Somerset Maugham first published in April 15th, 1919. It is told in episodic form by a first-person narrator, in a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character Charles Strickland, a middle-aged English stockbroker, who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist. The story is in part based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin.

According to some sources, the title, the meaning of which is not explicitly revealed in the book, was taken from a review of Maugham's novel Of Human Bondage in which the novel's protagonist, Philip Carey, is described as "so busy yearning for the moon that he never saw the sixpence at his feet." According to a 1956 letter from Maugham, "If you look on the ground in search of a sixpence, you don't look up, and so miss the moon." Maugham's title echoes the description of Gauguin by his contemporary biographer, Meier-Graefe (1908): "He [Gauguin] may be charged with having always wanted something else.">>
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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by orin stepanek » Mon Sep 02, 2019 12:44 pm

Beautiful APOD; Had to save it as a wallpaper! :D
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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by neufer » Mon Sep 02, 2019 12:50 pm

heehaw wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 11:24 am

Why are they called the Alps? It is because hundreds of years ago, a party of English explorers got lost in those mountains.
They say you can still sometimes hear them calling: 'alp! 'alp!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alps#Etymology_and_toponymy wrote:
<<The English word Alps derives from the Latin Alpes (through French). Maurus Servius Honoratus, an ancient commentator of Virgil, says in his commentary that all high mountains are called Alpes by Celts. The term may be common to Italo-Celtic, because the Celtic languages have terms for high mountains derived from alp.

This may be consistent with the theory that in Greek Alpes is a name of non-Indo-European origin (which is common for prominent mountains and mountain ranges in the Mediterranean region). According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the Latin Alpes might possibly derive from a pre-Indo-European word *alb "hill"; "Albania" is a related derivation. Albania, a name not native to the region known as the country of Albania, has been used as a name for a number of mountainous areas across Europe. In Roman times, "Albania" was a name for the eastern Caucasus, while in the English languages "Albania" (or "Albany") was occasionally used as a name for Scotland, although it is more likely derived from the Latin albus, the color white.

The Latin word Alpes could possibly come from the adjective albus (“white”).

In modern languages the term alp, alm, albe or alpe refers to a grazing pastures in the alpine regions below the glaciers, not the peaks. An alp refers to a high mountain pasture where cows are taken to be grazed during the summer months and where hay barns can be found, and the term "the Alps", referring to the mountains, is a misnomer.>>
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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by neufer » Mon Sep 02, 2019 1:16 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Boomer12k wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 10:12 am
StuartS wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 6:38 am

The description says that the Moon and Jupiter rose together in the southwest after sunset. I don't think that it is possible for the Moon or any of the planets to rise the southwest. Oops!
I was going to comment the same... they ROSE in the east, long before Sunset...they were..."nearer the southwestern horizon after sunset"... or so...and as evening progress... Set themselves. Or maybe "...appeared in the southwestern sky after sunset..." would be better still...
http://www.cc.com/video-clips/sh8sl3/th ... d-new-open
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Re: APOD: The Moon and Jupiter over the Alps (2019 Sep 02)

Post by RJN » Mon Sep 02, 2019 4:53 pm

Boomer12k wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 10:12 am
StuartS wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 6:38 am
The description says that the Moon and Jupiter rose together in the southwest after sunset. I don't think that it is possible for the Moon or any of the planets to rise the southwest. Oops!
I was going to comment the same... they ROSE in the east, long before Sunset...they were..."nearer the southwestern horizon after sunset"... or so...and as evening progress... Set themselves. Or maybe "...appeared in the southwestern sky after sunset..." would be better still...

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Yes, the original description was not very good and has now been updated -- on the main NASA site -- for accuracy. I apologize for the oversight.