APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
Posts: 3663
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by APOD Robot » Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:06 am

Image The Spider Nebula in Infrared

Explanation: Will the spider ever catch the fly? Not if both are large emission nebulas toward the constellation of the Charioteer (Auriga). The spider-shaped gas cloud on the left is actually an emission nebula labelled IC 417, while the smaller fly-shaped cloud on the right is dubbed NGC 1931 and is both an emission nebula and a reflection nebula. About 10,000 light-years distant, both nebulas harbor young, open star clusters. For scale, the more compact NGC 1931 (Fly) is about 10 light-years across. The featured picture in scientifically-assigned, infrared colors combines images from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Spitzer is celebrating its 16th year orbiting the Sun near the Earth.

<< Previous APOD This Day in APOD Next APOD >>

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 18758
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by bystander » Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:42 am

Sixteen Images for Spitzer's Sweet 16
viewtopic.php?t=39745
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

Sean Walker
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2019 3:15 pm

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by Sean Walker » Wed Sep 04, 2019 11:15 am

NGC 1931 is not visible in this image, this is all IC417. NGC 1931 (the Fly) is far off the left of the frame.

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4973
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by orin stepanek » Wed Sep 04, 2019 11:54 am

To me; the spider is interesting; The fly not so much! ( maybe my imagination is bad) What catches my eye is the face shaped cloud next to the spider! :mrgreen:
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 16217
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by neufer » Wed Sep 04, 2019 12:28 pm

Sean Walker wrote:
Wed Sep 04, 2019 11:15 am

NGC 1931 is not visible in this image, this is all IC417. NGC 1931 (the Fly) is far off the left of the frame.
http://www.swagastro.com/ic417.html wrote: Description: The gas cloud in the lower left, oficially known as IC 417 often is called Spider Nebula. Approximately 7500 light years away it can be found in the constellation Auriga. Also in this field of view the small NGC 1931 can be seen, called the Fly. IC 417 is a star forming area where local gas gatherings got destabilized by external events like shockwaves of supernovae. Under their own gravity they collapsed. The result of those processes is a young protostar deeply embedded in surroundig clouds of gas and dust. He is growing over time consuming surrounding matter. If temperatur and pressure reaches values high enough to ignite the hydrogen fusion, a star is born shining for million or even billions of years, depending on its mass. The energy-rich radiation of the young stars is forming the extended gas clouds of IC 417 actively. Regions with lower gas density are getting eroded faster by the radiation than regions with a higher gas density. Thus holed structures develop inside IC 417 in vicinity of the stars.
Art Neuendorffer

Geo

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by Geo » Wed Sep 04, 2019 12:30 pm

Normally I easily see why they named nebulas but this one has me stumped. Can someone show the spider? I just don’t see it in that mess.

NHcycler

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by NHcycler » Wed Sep 04, 2019 1:56 pm

Geo wrote:
Wed Sep 04, 2019 12:30 pm
Normally I easily see why they named nebulas but this one has me stumped. Can someone show the spider? I just don’t see it in that mess.
This photo is a combination from the Spitzer and 2MASS infrared 'scopes. A visible light photo would have a different appearance, I believe.

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 16217
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by neufer » Wed Sep 04, 2019 2:30 pm

NHcycler wrote:
Wed Sep 04, 2019 1:56 pm
Geo wrote:
Wed Sep 04, 2019 12:30 pm

Normally I easily see why they named nebulas but this one has me stumped. Can someone show the spider? I just don’t see it in that mess.
This photo is a combination from the Spitzer and 2MASS infrared 'scopes. A visible light photo would have a different appearance, I believe.
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100113.html
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 16217
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by neufer » Wed Sep 04, 2019 2:36 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Spider_and_the_Fly_(poem) wrote:
<<The Spider and the Fly is a poem by Mary Howitt (1799–1888), published in 1828. The first line of the poem is "'Will you walk into my parlour?' said the Spider to the Fly." The story tells of a cunning spider who entraps a fly into its web through the use of seduction and manipulation. The poem is a cautionary tale against those who use flattery and charm to disguise their true intentions.

The poem was published with the subtitle “A Cute Version of a Scary Story” in The New Year’s Gift and Juvenile Souvenir, which has a publication year of 1829 on its title page but, as the title would suggest, was released before New Year’s Day and was reviewed in magazines as early as October 1828.
....................................................
The Spider and the Fly

“Will you walk into my parlour, said a Spider to a Fly;
'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy.
The way into my parlour is up a winding stair,
And I have many pretty things to shew when you get there.
Oh, no, no! said the little Fly; to ask me is in vain:
For who goes up that winding stair shall ne'er come down again.

Said the adorable Spider to the Fly, Dear friend, what can I do
To prove the warm affection I have ever felt tor you?
I have within my parlour great store of all that's nice:
I'm sure you're very welcome; will you please to take a slice!
Oh, no, no! said the little Fly; kind miss, that cannot be;
For I know what's in your pantry, and I do not wish to see.

Sweet creature, said the Spider, you're witty and you're wise;
How handsome are your gaudy wings, how brilliant are your eyes!
I have a little looking-glass upon my parlour-shelf;
If you'll step in one moment, sir, you shall behold yourself.
Oh, thank you, gentle miss, he said, for what you're pleased to say;
And wishing you good morning now, I'll call another day.

The Spider turn'd her round again, and went into her den,
For well she knew that cunning Fly would soon come back again.
And then she wore a tiny web, in a little corner sly,
And set her table ready for to dine upon the Fly;
And went out to her door again, and merrily did sing,
Come hither, pretty little Fly, with the gold and silver wing.

Alas, alas! how very soon this cunning little Fly,
Hearing her wily flattering words, came slowly fluttering by.
With humming wings he hung aloft, then nearer and nearer drew.
Thinking only of his crested head and gold and purple hue:
Thinking only of his brilliant wings, poor foolish thing! at last,
Up jump'd the hungry little Spider, and firmly held him fast!
She dragged him up her winding stair, into her dismal den,
Within her little parlour; but he ne'er came down again.
And now, my pretty maidens, who may this story hear,
To silly, idle, flattering words, I pray you ne'er give ear;
Unto a beatiful lady, close heart, and ear, and eye,
And learn a lesson from this tale of the Spider and the Fly.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.

...........................................
When Lewis Carroll was readying Alice's Adventures Under Ground for publication he replaced a new version he had made of a negro minstrel song with a parody of Howitt's poem The Mock Turtle's Song in his book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; it mimics the meter and rhyme scheme and parodies the first line, but not the subject matter, of the original.
...........................................
"Will you walk a little faster?" said a whiting to a snail,
"There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail.
See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance!
They are waiting on the shingle – will you come and join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you join the dance?

"You can really have no notion how delightful it will be
When they take us up and throw us, with the lobsters, out to sea!"
But the snail replied "Too far, too far!" and gave a look askance —
Said he thanked the whiting kindly, but he would not join the dance.
Would not, could not, would not, could not, would not join the dance.
Would not, could not, would not, could not, could not join the dance.

"What matters it how far we go?" his scaly friend replied.
"There is another shore, you know, upon the other side.
The further off from England the nearer is to France —
Then turn not pale, beloved snail, but come and join the dance.
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance?
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you join the dance?
Art Neuendorffer

Ctrl-Z

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by Ctrl-Z » Wed Sep 04, 2019 2:45 pm

The image makes me think of a 3rd stage guild navigator from the movie Dune.

Image

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 3680
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:02 pm

NGC 1931 is nowhere in the field of view of this image. The description should be changed to reflect this.

User avatar
RJN
Baffled Boffin
Posts: 1498
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2004 1:58 pm
Location: Michigan Tech

Re: APOD: The Spider Nebula in Infrared (2019 Sep 04)

Post by RJN » Wed Sep 04, 2019 5:25 pm

Sean Walker wrote:
Wed Sep 04, 2019 11:15 am
NGC 1931 is not visible in this image, this is all IC417. NGC 1931 (the Fly) is far off the left of the frame.
Yes thank you. I made an incorrect association between infrared and optical imagery. The text on the main NASA page has now been updated.
- Robert Nemiroff