APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

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APOD Robot
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APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by APOD Robot » Sat Jan 01, 2022 5:05 am

Image The Full Moon of 2021

Explanation: Every Full Moon of 2021 shines in this year-spanning astrophoto project, a composite portrait of the familiar lunar nearside at each brightest lunar phase. Arranged by moonth, the year progresses in stripes beginning at the top. Taken with the same camera and lens the stripes are from Full Moon images all combined at the same pixel scale. The stripes still looked mismatched, but they show that the Full Moon's angular size changes throughout the year depending on its distance from Kolkata, India, planet Earth. The calendar month, a full moon name, distance in kilometers, and angular size is indicated for each stripe. Angular size is given in minutes of arc corresponding to 1/60th of a degree. The largest Full Moon is near a perigee or closest approach in May. The smallest is near an apogee, the most distant Full Moon in December. Of course the full moons of May and November also slid into Earth's shadow during 2021's two lunar eclipses.

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RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by RocketRon » Sat Jan 01, 2022 5:11 am

Interesting. And very neat.

But wouldn't there be 13 ?
Hope this doesn't upset the apple cart ...

RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by RocketRon » Sat Jan 01, 2022 5:26 am

No, the 13 were in 2020
2 in early and late Nov...

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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by De58te » Sat Jan 01, 2022 9:23 am

I am thinking do they have a drought this/last year in India? Because to undertake such a project over an entire year with the same camera and location has to rely on pure luck. A full moon only lasts for some 10 to 12 hours in the night each month, and that it works out there is not any obscuring clouds covering the Moon is a lucky happenstance. Where I live near Lake Ontario, I know we had clear skies in December for the full Moon since I looked out a window at it. But the November full Moon was obscured by clouds the entire night and was not visible since we were having a rain storm. (Possibly some other full Moons earlier in the year might have been affected, but I had no reason to make a note of it.)

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XgeoX
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by XgeoX » Sat Jan 01, 2022 11:35 am

I want to wish a happy new year to all the posters here, you are good company and have taught me much. In particular I would like to thank…

Ann, I truly appreciate all the tremendous work you put into your posts. They are beautiful and informative, I have learned much from them. Thank You!

Orin, not only are your posts illustrative and informative but you also share my love of the kitties. The photos you find always leave me smiling. Thanks for your kind easygoing nature.

Nuefer, you always bring a lot to the conversations with your varied posts. I always knew I would like your input when I saw your picture… “What, me worry?” :D

Johnnydeep, I notice you always have interesting questions and points about the discussion at hand. I appreciate your high quality input!

And last but certainly not least… Chris Peterson! I really appreciate have your expertise and experience to tap into. It’s nice having a real professional in here to goto. You are kind of like Mr. Spock on our bridge! Seriously though I have learned so much from you. Thank You!

There are too many to go on listing but I find this board to be the most rewarding one I have ever been in. Thanks for putting up with my sometimes ignorant input and helping me learn new things every day…

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne?

Chorus:

For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint-stoup!
and surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak' a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

Chorus

We twa hae run about the braes,
and pou'd the gowans fine;
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
sin' auld lang syne.

Chorus

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
sin' auld lang syne.

Chorus

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
and gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak' a right gude-willie waught,
for auld lang syne.

Chorus


Eric
Ego vigilate
Ego audire

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XgeoX
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by XgeoX » Sat Jan 01, 2022 11:42 am

De58te wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 9:23 am
I am thinking do they have a drought this/last year in India? Because to undertake such a project over an entire year with the same camera and location has to rely on pure luck. A full moon only lasts for some 10 to 12 hours in the night each month, and that it works out there is not any obscuring clouds covering the Moon is a lucky happenstance. Where I live near Lake Ontario, I know we had clear skies in December for the full Moon since I looked out a window at it. But the November full Moon was obscured by clouds the entire night and was not visible since we were having a rain storm. (Possibly some other full Moons earlier in the year might have been affected, but I had no reason to make a note of it.)
India unfortunately has been struck hard by severe drought throughout last year. They blame it on a unusually strong La Nina.

Eric
Ego vigilate
Ego audire

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JohnD
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by JohnD » Sat Jan 01, 2022 1:15 pm

I usually think of La Nina as a southern Hemisphere phenomenon, so I am educated by referring to its effect on India. But when I looked it up, all the sites say that a strong La Nina means a cooler winter and MORE rainfall in India.


That apart from the apparent diameter of the Moon, each full is identical to the next, which demonstrates why the fanciful and allegedly historical names attached to each are nonense and have no place on an astronomical site. Boring I know, but should be said. Great achievement to take all twelve so clearly!
John

DL MARTIN

Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by DL MARTIN » Sat Jan 01, 2022 2:41 pm

Thanks to all for opening my eyes to the past.

HAPPY NEW YEAR.

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orin stepanek
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by orin stepanek » Sat Jan 01, 2022 2:44 pm

MoonstripsAnnotatedIG.jpg
Soumyadeep Mukherjee; Nicely done 8-) !
December-full-moon-2012-Norway-Timothy-Boocock-e1637441717221.png
BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR! I am a coldy cat; I chill real easily! :roll:
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Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Chris Peterson
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sat Jan 01, 2022 2:56 pm

JohnD wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 1:15 pm
I usually think of La Nina as a southern Hemisphere phenomenon, so I am educated by referring to its effect on India. But when I looked it up, all the sites say that a strong La Nina means a cooler winter and MORE rainfall in India.


That apart from the apparent diameter of the Moon, each full is identical to the next, which demonstrates why the fanciful and allegedly historical names attached to each are nonense and have no place on an astronomical site. Boring I know, but should be said. Great achievement to take all twelve so clearly!
John
We should, perhaps, also avoid the fanciful, historical names attached to the planets, which are, of course, unrelated to any mythological gods. Culture has no place on an astronomical site!
Chris

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Chris Peterson
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sat Jan 01, 2022 2:59 pm

De58te wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 9:23 am
I am thinking do they have a drought this/last year in India? Because to undertake such a project over an entire year with the same camera and location has to rely on pure luck. A full moon only lasts for some 10 to 12 hours in the night each month, and that it works out there is not any obscuring clouds covering the Moon is a lucky happenstance. Where I live near Lake Ontario, I know we had clear skies in December for the full Moon since I looked out a window at it. But the November full Moon was obscured by clouds the entire night and was not visible since we were having a rain storm. (Possibly some other full Moons earlier in the year might have been affected, but I had no reason to make a note of it.)
Depends on location, too. I could embark on this project from here in Colorado and the odds would be in my favor. It is rare that I miss seeing a full Moon.
Chris

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JohnD
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by JohnD » Sat Jan 01, 2022 4:56 pm

Oh, come on, Chris! You know how many objects are designated YTFJH L-54765 or something. The Moon is the Moon, Saturn is Saturn, but we don't use "Thin Saturn" or "Fat Saturn" as it displays its' rings at different angles. https://earthsky.org/upl/2018/05/Saturnoppositions.jpg

Venus may be a "Morning Star" or an "Evening Star" for thoroughly practical reasons. No primitive people would have attributed the growth of a deer's antlers to make it a "Buck Moon", and to call a December full Moon as the "Cold Moon" has to the result of a desperate struggle to find some thing or event to call it by. All these names are modern constructs, born of a wishful romanticism, as pompous and condescending as to refer to the "Noble Savage".

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Chris Peterson
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sat Jan 01, 2022 4:58 pm

JohnD wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 4:56 pm
Oh, come on, Chris! You know how many objects are designated YTFJH L-54765 or something. The Moon is the Moon, Saturn is Saturn, but we don't use "Thin Saturn" or "Fat Saturn" as it displays its' rings at different angles. https://earthsky.org/upl/2018/05/Saturnoppositions.jpg

Venus may be a "Morning Star" or an "Evening Star" for thoroughly practical reasons. No primitive people would have attributed the growth of a deer's antlers to make it a "Buck Moon", and to call a December full Moon as the "Cold Moon" has to the result of a desperate struggle to find some thing or event to call it by. All these names are modern constructs, born of a wishful romanticism, as pompous and condescending as to refer to the "Noble Savage".
In fact, we do use special terms to define the angles of rings and similar aspects.

Personally, I find the inclusion of cultural references to things like specific moons valuable, even essential in an astronomy forum like this one.
Chris

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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by neufer » Sat Jan 01, 2022 5:16 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 2:59 pm
De58te wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 9:23 am

I am thinking do they have a drought this/last year in India? Because to undertake such a project over an entire year with the same camera and location has to rely on pure luck. A full moon only lasts for some 10 to 12 hours in the night each month, and that it works out there is not any obscuring clouds covering the Moon is a lucky happenstance. Where I live near Lake Ontario, I know we had clear skies in December for the full Moon since I looked out a window at it. But the November full Moon was obscured by clouds the entire night and was not visible since we were having a rain storm. (Possibly some other full Moons earlier in the year might have been affected, but I had no reason to make a note of it.)
Depends on location, too. I could embark on this project from here in Colorado and the odds would be in my favor. It is rare that I miss seeing a full Moon.
  • Colorado vs. Kolkata (i.e., Calcutta) :roll:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kolkata#Rainfall[/quote wrote:
<<Rains brought by the Bay of Bengal branch of the south-west summer monsoon lash Kolkata between June and September, supplying it with most of its annual rainfall of about 1,850 mm (73 in). The highest monthly rainfall total occurs in July and August. In these months often incessant rain for days brings life to a stall for the city dwellers. The city receives 2,107 hours (~175 half days) of sunshine per year, with maximum sunlight exposure occurring in April.>>
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by johnnydeep » Sat Jan 01, 2022 10:19 pm

XgeoX wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 11:35 am
I want to wish a happy new year to all the posters here, you are good company and have taught me much. In particular I would like to thank…

Ann, I truly appreciate all the tremendous work you put into your posts. They are beautiful and informative, I have learned much from them. Thank You!

Orin, not only are your posts illustrative and informative but you also share my love of the kitties. The photos you find always leave me smiling. Thanks for your kind easygoing nature.

Nuefer, you always bring a lot to the conversations with your varied posts. I always knew I would like your input when I saw your picture… “What, me worry?” :D

Johnnydeep, I notice you always have interesting questions and points about the discussion at hand. I appreciate your high quality input!

And last but certainly not least… Chris Peterson! I really appreciate have your expertise and experience to tap into. It’s nice having a real professional in here to goto. You are kind of like Mr. Spock on our bridge! Seriously though I have learned so much from you. Thank You!

There are too many to go on listing but I find this board to be the most rewarding one I have ever been in. Thanks for putting up with my sometimes ignorant input and helping me learn new things every day…

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne?
...

Eric
I heartily second this sentiment, though I am embarrassed - but humbled - to have made your list. May my questions and small amount of added "signal" continue to improve in quality as my knowledge grows. I am truly thankful to this forum for saving my brain from complete atrophy in retirement.

May we all have a Happy New Year, and a 100% successful JWST deployment followed by a 10+ year glorious operating life span.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

johnp

Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by johnp » Sat Jan 01, 2022 11:50 pm

The delta of Arc between December and January is about 2 minutes, which is almost double the next largest delta. Why?

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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by DonB312 » Sun Jan 02, 2022 4:42 am

XgeoX wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 11:35 am
I want to wish a happy new year to all the posters here, you are good company and have taught me much. In particular I would like to thank…

Ann, I truly appreciate all the tremendous work you put into your posts. They are beautiful and informative, I have learned much from them. Thank You!

Orin, not only are your posts illustrative and informative but you also share my love of the kitties. The photos you find always leave me smiling. Thanks for your kind easygoing nature.

Nuefer, you always bring a lot to the conversations with your varied posts. I always knew I would like your input when I saw your picture… “What, me worry?” :D

Johnnydeep, I notice you always have interesting questions and points about the discussion at hand. I appreciate your high quality input!

And last but certainly not least… Chris Peterson! I really appreciate have your expertise and experience to tap into. It’s nice having a real professional in here to goto. You are kind of like Mr. Spock on our bridge! Seriously though I have learned so much from you. Thank You!

There are too many to go on listing but I find this board to be the most rewarding one I have ever been in. Thanks for putting up with my sometimes ignorant input and helping me learn new things every day…

Eric
I agree with your post completely, Eric!
Thanks to all for making this my favorite forum.

Happy New Year!

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Ann
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Re: APOD: The Full Moon of 2021 (2022 Jan 01)

Post by Ann » Sun Jan 02, 2022 5:54 am

XgeoX wrote:
Sat Jan 01, 2022 11:35 am
I want to wish a happy new year to all the posters here, you are good company and have taught me much. In particular I would like to thank…

Ann, I truly appreciate all the tremendous work you put into your posts. They are beautiful and informative, I have learned much from them. Thank You!

Orin, not only are your posts illustrative and informative but you also share my love of the kitties. The photos you find always leave me smiling. Thanks for your kind easygoing nature.

Nuefer, you always bring a lot to the conversations with your varied posts. I always knew I would like your input when I saw your picture… “What, me worry?” :D

Johnnydeep, I notice you always have interesting questions and points about the discussion at hand. I appreciate your high quality input!

And last but certainly not least… Chris Peterson! I really appreciate have your expertise and experience to tap into. It’s nice having a real professional in here to goto. You are kind of like Mr. Spock on our bridge! Seriously though I have learned so much from you. Thank You!

There are too many to go on listing but I find this board to be the most rewarding one I have ever been in. Thanks for putting up with my sometimes ignorant input and helping me learn new things every day…

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne?

Chorus:

For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.


...

Eric
Eric, thank you so much for your praise! 🌼

And you are right, this is a great forum. I, too, want to thank Orin, Art, Chris, johnnydeep, MarkBour, alter-ego, rstevenson, starsurfer, Fred the Cat and many others - and bystander! Don't forget bystander! And Geckzilla, who still manages this site, unless I'm wrong. And RJN and Jerry Bonnell, of course, who make it all happen in the first place by presenting us with a new Astronomy Picture of the Day every day!

Thanks everyone, and keep posting! ❤️

Ann
Color Commentator