Found Images: 2019 September

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Found Images: 2019 September

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:49 pm


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 400K.

Thank you!

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ESO: Caught in the Act (Messier 95)

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:01 pm

Caught in the Act
ESO Picture of the Week | 2019 Sep 02
NGC 3351, also known as Messier 95, was first discovered in 1781 by Pierre Méchain, a French astronomer and surveyor who worked alongside Charles Messier. NGC 3351 is a type of galaxy known as a barred spiral galaxy and it is located in the constellation of Leo (The Lion).

New observations of this object have shown stellar feedback in action. Stellar feedback is the process of redistributing energy into the interstellar medium (the space in between the stars) within star-forming galaxies. In this particular galaxy, star formation is occurring in the ring surrounding the galaxy nucleus at such a violent rate that massive bubbles of hot gas can actually be seen being ejected. This ejected gas can then contribute (both positively and negatively) to ongoing star formation within the galaxy.

The data for this observation were taken with ALMA, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope, showing once again that scientific collaboration across multiple facilities can produce some wonderful results.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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HEIC: Hubble’s Legacy (UGC 685)

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:16 pm

Hubble’s Legacy
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 Sep 02
This Picture of the Week shows a dwarf galaxy named UGC 685. Such galaxies are small and contain just a tiny fraction of the number of stars in a galaxy like the Milky Way. Dwarf galaxies often show a hazy structure, an ill-defined shape, and an appearance somewhat akin to a swarm or cloud of stars — and UGC 685 is no exception to this. Classified as an SAm galaxy — a type of unbarred spiral galaxy — it is located about 15 million light-years from Earth.

These data were gathered under the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) Program, the sharpest and most comprehensive ultraviolet survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe.

LEGUS is imaging 50 spiral and dwarf galaxies in our cosmic neighbourhood in multiple colours using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The survey is picking apart the structures of these galaxies and resolving their constituent stars, clusters, groups, and other stellar associations. Star formation plays a huge role in shaping its host galaxy; by exploring these targets in detail via both new observations and archival Hubble data, LEGUS will shed light on how stars form and cluster together, how these clusters evolve, how a star’s formation affects its surroundings, and how stars explode at the end of their lives.
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:23 pm

Puppis A
http://www.astro-austral.cl/imagenes/ne ... A/info.htm
Copyright: José Joaquin Pérez
puppis_a.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:26 pm

P Cygni, PN G75.5+1.7 and Abell 69
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... ndPCyg.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Max Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies and Frank Sackenheim
PCyg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:29 pm

Mask Nebula (CVMP 1)
https://astrodonimaging.com/gallery/mask-nebula/
Copyright: Don Goldman
Mask.jpg
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Last edited by starsurfer on Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:31 pm

Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543)
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/catseyenebula
Copyright: Mark Hanson
Cats+Eye+Nebula.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:33 pm

Jacoby 1
https://www.britastro.org/node/18488
Copyright: Peter Goodhew
Jacoby1.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:39 pm

Gum 15
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo99.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by Ann » Tue Sep 03, 2019 11:09 pm

starsurfer wrote:
Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:26 pm
P Cygni, PN G75.5+1.7 and Abell 69
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... ndPCyg.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Max Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies and Frank Sackenheim
PCyg.jpg
That's a stunning image.

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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Sat Sep 07, 2019 10:27 am

Dr 27
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... s/Dr27.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies and Frank Sackenheim
Dr27.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 08, 2019 9:03 am

NGC 4731
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/339
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken

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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by Ann » Sun Sep 08, 2019 5:03 pm

NGC 4390
http://www.caelumobservatory.com/gallery/n4390.shtml
Copyright: Adam Block

According to Principal Galaxy Catalog, the luminosity of NGC 4390 is only a tenth of the luminosity of the Milky Way. The galaxy does look small. Note the oval bulge and the inner spiral arm curving gently around it. Also note the very small satellite galaxy hanging on like a little appendix at upper right.

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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 09, 2019 12:46 pm

B312
http://www.astrophoton.com/B312.htm
Copyright: Bernhard Hubl
B312.jpg
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ESO: Banishing Light Pollution

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 09, 2019 2:55 pm

Banishing Light Pollution
ESO Picture of the Week | 2019 Sep 09
This beautiful image features the Milky Way rising over the Residencia at ESO’s Paranal Observatory, which can be seen atop a mountain in the distance. The Residencia is ESO’s private hotel for staff at Paranal, a home away from home for the astronomers, engineers, technicians, and other visitors to the site. Known as an “oasis for astronomers”, the building includes a restaurant, music room, library, swimming pool, and even a sauna to help astronomers to relax between and after their shifts. It was even featured in the James Bond film “Quantum of Solace” (2008).

This photograph was taken by ESO Photo Ambassador Petr Horálek, and is a great demonstration of just how artificial light can pollute its environment — the brightness of the Residencia lights seems almost blinding compared to the stars. Artificial light scatters off the particles in our atmosphere and can drown out the night sky. Preserving the dark skies around Paranal is of the utmost importance to ESO — the darkness surrounding the observatory allows astronomers to obtain excellent data. The preservation of dark skies is critical to the sensitivity and clarity of science observations. The non-celestial lights in this image are relatively few — a stark contrast to the streetlight-studded roads and illuminated cities you may be used to.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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HEIC: Dark Matter in the Belly of the Whale (UGC 695)

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 09, 2019 3:05 pm

Dark Matter in the Belly of the Whale
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 Sep 09
This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, focuses on an object named UGC 695, which is located 30 million light-years away within the constellation Cetus (The Sea Monster), also known as The Whale.

UGC 695 is a low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxy. These galaxies are so faint that their brightness is less than the background brightness of Earth’s atmosphere, which makes them tricky to observe. This low brightness is the result of the relatively small number of stars within them — most of the baryonic matter in these galaxies exists in the form of huge clouds of gas and dust. The stars are also distributed over a relatively large area.

LSB galaxies, like dwarf galaxies, have a high fraction of dark matter relative to the number of stars they contain. Astronomers still debate about how LSB galaxies formed in the first place.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 10, 2019 1:47 pm

Tarantula Nebula (NGC 2070)
http://www.karelteuwen.be/photo_page.ph ... 5&album=19
Copyright: Karel Teuwen
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AAS: Making Molecules on Dust

Post by bystander » Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:44 pm

Making Molecules on Dust
AAS Nova Featured Image | 2019 Sep 09
Susanna Kohler wrote:


How do molecules form in the hostile environments of the circumstellar and interstellar medium? Laboratory experiments are helping us to better understand this process! The image above (click for the full view) shows a high-resolution electron microscopy image of the complex surfaces of silicate grains, representative of dust grains found in the space around and between stars. In a new study led by Alexey Potapov (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Germany), scientists deposited thin layers of carbon dioxide and ammonia ices on nanometer-sized silicate and carbon grains and explored the subsequent chemical reactions under conditions similar to those of the interstellar medium. In the team’s experiments, the reactions that form complex organic molecules happened three times as fast in the ice on the surface of dust grains as they did in the ice alone. This catalytic effect of dust surfaces is an important piece in the puzzle of how complex molecules — and ultimately, life — formed in our universe. You can read the full article below to find out more!

Evidence of Surface Catalytic Effect on Cosmic Dust Grain Analogs:
The Ammonia and Carbon Dioxide Surface Reaction
~ Alexey Potapov et al
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:46 pm

Sh2-96
http://outters.fr/wp/?p=8274
Copyright: Nicolas Outters
Sh2-96.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:48 pm

Sh2-78
https://pbase.com/skybox/image/169559327
Copyright: Kevin Quin
169559327.on2ZiAc9.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:50 pm


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Ann
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Re: Found Images: 2019 September

Post by Ann » Wed Sep 11, 2019 1:23 pm

starsurfer wrote:
Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:46 pm
Sh2-96
http://outters.fr/wp/?p=8274
Copyright: Nicolas Outters
Sh2-96.jpg

Interesting! :D This kind of nebulosity really, really looks as if it was caused by a single energetic star or possibly a supernova explosion. At least the magenta filament in the lower part of the picture looks like it could be a remnant of a supernova explosion, but the red streamers don't look like that. The blue star a center right looks like it could be just the kind of energizing source that we are looking for, but my software says that this star (HD 183300) belongs to unimpressive spectral class A.

Fascinating image anyway! :D

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Re: ESO: Caught in the Act (Messier 95)

Post by Ann » Wed Sep 11, 2019 1:40 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:01 pm
Caught in the Act
ESO Picture of the Week | 2019 Sep 02
NGC 3351, also known as Messier 95, was first discovered in 1781 by Pierre Méchain, a French astronomer and surveyor who worked alongside Charles Messier. NGC 3351 is a type of galaxy known as a barred spiral galaxy and it is located in the constellation of Leo (The Lion).

New observations of this object have shown stellar feedback in action. Stellar feedback is the process of redistributing energy into the interstellar medium (the space in between the stars) within star-forming galaxies. In this particular galaxy, star formation is occurring in the ring surrounding the galaxy nucleus at such a violent rate that massive bubbles of hot gas can actually be seen being ejected. This ejected gas can then contribute (both positively and negatively) to ongoing star formation within the galaxy.

The data for this observation were taken with ALMA, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope, showing once again that scientific collaboration across multiple facilities can produce some wonderful results.
Great picture! :D But I think we need to see a closeup of a larger part of the galaxy to understand what the new picture is actually showing us.

The inner starforming ring of galaxy M95.
ESO/ R. Leaman/ D. Gadotti/ K. Sandstrom/ D. Calzetti
M95 with an inner ring, a yellow bar and bulge region and an outer ring.
Johan Knapen (ING) and Nik Szymanek.



























This comparison makes it easier to see that the red filamentary ring surrounding the inner stellar ring in the picture at left (but invisible in the picture at right) is indeed hot gas. Note that this region of hot gas is actually bordered by dust structures, as you can see in the picture at right.

Ann
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