APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

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APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by APOD Robot » Fri May 07, 2021 4:07 am

Image Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch

Explanation: Sixty years ago, near the dawn of the space age, NASA controllers "lit the candle" and sent Mercury astronaut Alan Shepard arcing into space atop a Redstone rocket. His cramped space capsule was dubbed Freedom 7. Broadcast live to a global television audience, the historic Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral Florida at 9:34 a.m. Eastern Time on May 5, 1961. The flight of Freedom 7, the first space flight by an American, followed less than a month after the first human venture into space by Soviet Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. The 15 minute sub-orbital flight achieved an altitude of 116 miles and a maximum speed of 5,134 miles per hour. As Shepard looked back near the peak of Freedom 7's trajectory, he could see the outlines of the west coast of Florida, Lake Okeechobe in central Florida, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Bahamas. Shepard would later view planet Earth from a more distant perspective and walk on the Moon as commander of the Apollo 14 mission.

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by RocketRon » Fri May 07, 2021 4:18 am

They were brave men back then. !
That really was a flight into the unknown.

Even if they did send a dog up first, to see that it would survive.

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by MarkBour » Fri May 07, 2021 6:14 am

RocketRon wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 4:18 am
They were brave men back then. !
That really was a flight into the unknown.

Even if they did send a dog up first, to see that it would survive.
LOL. We are such a considerate species, allowing so many others the honor of going first !

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animals_in_space is a delightful article.
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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Doug FitzGerald » Fri May 07, 2021 8:30 am

What are those figures standing around the launch pad? Protective equipment test dummies?

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by JohnD » Fri May 07, 2021 8:36 am

Brave? Phenomenally brave!

Look at the kit of that launch pad; compare it with the same of the ancestral V2 rocket and apart from a taller rocket, there had been no development in twenty years! See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94T8VxOOvdI
And then with the Saturn V launch pad, only six years later! http://www.moonhoaxdebunked.com/2017/07 ... ocket.html (It's just a good pic! Ignore the moonhoax aspects!)

The Redstone was a US riposte to Gagarin, cobbled together from an operational military ballistic missile, and Shepard was suicidally brave!
John

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by orin stepanek » Fri May 07, 2021 12:23 pm

6100884MR3_900.jpg

Yes everyone born before 1960 probably
remembers the mercury capsule; then the
goal was to catch the Russians! It was a
trying time; but improved technology
followed!
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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Wadsworth » Fri May 07, 2021 3:56 pm

It's incredible that we went from the first man in space to boots on the moon in only eight years.

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by orin stepanek » Fri May 07, 2021 4:57 pm

Wadsworth wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 3:56 pm
It's incredible that we went from the first man in space to boots on the moon in only eight years.


+1 :thumb_up: :yes:
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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by johnnydeep » Fri May 07, 2021 8:35 pm

Wadsworth wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 3:56 pm
It's incredible that we went from the first man in space to boots on the moon in only eight years.
And equally incredible that our boots have gone no farther since then. :(
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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Chris Peterson » Fri May 07, 2021 10:45 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 8:35 pm
Wadsworth wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 3:56 pm
It's incredible that we went from the first man in space to boots on the moon in only eight years.
And equally incredible that our boots have gone no farther since then. :(
It is important to remember that the early space program was all about military might. It was cold war posturing, not science. And boots on the Moon didn't really do much... although it did so at great cost.

Since then, humans have launched hundreds of research missions, visited every planet as well as comets and asteroids, and advanced our knowledge of the Solar System and the Universe immeasurably. In large part because we devoted our limited resources to robotic missions, capable of returning large amounts of information, as opposed to putting boots on other bodies, which is showy, but that's about all.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by MarkBour » Fri May 07, 2021 10:47 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 8:35 pm
Wadsworth wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 3:56 pm
It's incredible that we went from the first man in space to boots on the moon in only eight years.
And equally incredible that our boots have gone no farther since then. :(
Your metaphorical usage is valid and so it was nice to say it the way you did.


But ... technically, some boots have recently gone farther. :D
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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by uberK » Sat May 08, 2021 12:14 am

Hi,
I wanted to ask if the little figure off on the grass at the lower right is ... a person? It wouldn't surprise me if so. That is close though.

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by johnnydeep » Sat May 08, 2021 6:36 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 10:45 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 8:35 pm
Wadsworth wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 3:56 pm
It's incredible that we went from the first man in space to boots on the moon in only eight years.
And equally incredible that our boots have gone no farther since then. :(
It is important to remember that the early space program was all about military might. It was cold war posturing, not science. And boots on the Moon didn't really do much... although it did so at great cost.

Since then, humans have launched hundreds of research missions, visited every planet as well as comets and asteroids, and advanced our knowledge of the Solar System and the Universe immeasurably. In large part because we devoted our limited resources to robotic missions, capable of returning large amounts of information, as opposed to putting boots on other bodies, which is showy, but that's about all.
I realize all that, but it would be hard to argue that manned missions to other planets wouldn't have been a much better use of (even a modest fraction of) the trillions that have been spent on national defense over the past decades. And I think you could also argue that the technological innovations necessary to accomplish that would have had beneficial repercussions for humanity beyond what has been gained from robotic missions.
--
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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun May 09, 2021 4:07 am

johnnydeep wrote:
Sat May 08, 2021 6:36 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 10:45 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 8:35 pm


And equally incredible that our boots have gone no farther since then. :(
It is important to remember that the early space program was all about military might. It was cold war posturing, not science. And boots on the Moon didn't really do much... although it did so at great cost.

Since then, humans have launched hundreds of research missions, visited every planet as well as comets and asteroids, and advanced our knowledge of the Solar System and the Universe immeasurably. In large part because we devoted our limited resources to robotic missions, capable of returning large amounts of information, as opposed to putting boots on other bodies, which is showy, but that's about all.
I realize all that, but it would be hard to argue that manned missions to other planets wouldn't have been a much better use of (even a modest fraction of) the trillions that have been spent on national defense over the past decades. And I think you could also argue that the technological innovations necessary to accomplish that would have had beneficial repercussions for humanity beyond what has been gained from robotic missions.
But that funding wasn't an option. As to the other... no, I think the advances from robotics are significantly beyond what we'd get from manned missions.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun May 09, 2021 3:45 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:07 am
johnnydeep wrote:
Sat May 08, 2021 6:36 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Fri May 07, 2021 10:45 pm


It is important to remember that the early space program was all about military might. It was cold war posturing, not science. And boots on the Moon didn't really do much... although it did so at great cost.

Since then, humans have launched hundreds of research missions, visited every planet as well as comets and asteroids, and advanced our knowledge of the Solar System and the Universe immeasurably. In large part because we devoted our limited resources to robotic missions, capable of returning large amounts of information, as opposed to putting boots on other bodies, which is showy, but that's about all.
I realize all that, but it would be hard to argue that manned missions to other planets wouldn't have been a much better use of (even a modest fraction of) the trillions that have been spent on national defense over the past decades. And I think you could also argue that the technological innovations necessary to accomplish that would have had beneficial repercussions for humanity beyond what has been gained from robotic missions.
But that funding wasn't an option. As to the other... no, I think the advances from robotics are significantly beyond what we'd get from manned missions.
Yes, there have been great advances due to robotic missions, but I believe the advancements from human missions would likely be in different but equally important areas more directly related to human health, climate change, and the protection of Earth from human actions. Hopefully someday soon we will find out.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun May 09, 2021 3:47 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:45 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:07 am
johnnydeep wrote:
Sat May 08, 2021 6:36 pm


I realize all that, but it would be hard to argue that manned missions to other planets wouldn't have been a much better use of (even a modest fraction of) the trillions that have been spent on national defense over the past decades. And I think you could also argue that the technological innovations necessary to accomplish that would have had beneficial repercussions for humanity beyond what has been gained from robotic missions.
But that funding wasn't an option. As to the other... no, I think the advances from robotics are significantly beyond what we'd get from manned missions.
Yes, there have been great advances due to robotic missions, but I believe the advancements from human missions would likely be in different but equally important areas more directly related to human health, climate change, and the protection of Earth from human actions. Hopefully someday soon we will find out.
I hope not. I oppose almost all human exploration of space as a waste of resources. It serves no purpose while sucking resources from things that provide genuine benefits.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun May 09, 2021 3:53 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:47 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:45 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:07 am


But that funding wasn't an option. As to the other... no, I think the advances from robotics are significantly beyond what we'd get from manned missions.
Yes, there have been great advances due to robotic missions, but I believe the advancements from human missions would likely be in different but equally important areas more directly related to human health, climate change, and the protection of Earth from human actions. Hopefully someday soon we will find out.
I hope not. I oppose almost all human exploration of space as a waste of resources. It serves no purpose while sucking resources from things that provide genuine benefits.
Understood, but I'm happy Elon Musk appears to disagree.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun May 09, 2021 4:01 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:53 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:47 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:45 pm


Yes, there have been great advances due to robotic missions, but I believe the advancements from human missions would likely be in different but equally important areas more directly related to human health, climate change, and the protection of Earth from human actions. Hopefully someday soon we will find out.
I hope not. I oppose almost all human exploration of space as a waste of resources. It serves no purpose while sucking resources from things that provide genuine benefits.
Understood, but I'm happy Elon Musk appears to disagree.
I have no issue at all with private enterprises engaging in such activities. I just don't like to see NASA or other publicly funded agencies doing so.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun May 09, 2021 4:38 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:01 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:53 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:47 pm

I hope not. I oppose almost all human exploration of space as a waste of resources. It serves no purpose while sucking resources from things that provide genuine benefits.
Understood, but I'm happy Elon Musk appears to disagree.
I have no issue at all with private enterprises engaging in such activities. I just don't like to see NASA or other publicly funded agencies doing so.
Just curious what you think of the science being done by humans on the ISS? Mostly a waste, or does it provide some useful scientific knowledge? Is there anything being gained from the human residents there, or are they superfluous?
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun May 09, 2021 4:52 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:38 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:01 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 3:53 pm


Understood, but I'm happy Elon Musk appears to disagree.
I have no issue at all with private enterprises engaging in such activities. I just don't like to see NASA or other publicly funded agencies doing so.
Just curious what you think of the science being done by humans on the ISS? Mostly a waste, or does it provide some useful scientific knowledge? Is there anything being gained from the human residents there, or are they superfluous?
What science? They spend 99% of their time keeping the plumbing and air recycling equipment functional. And almost none of the science they're doing couldn't be done just as effectively by robots.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun May 09, 2021 5:31 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:52 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:38 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:01 pm


I have no issue at all with private enterprises engaging in such activities. I just don't like to see NASA or other publicly funded agencies doing so.
Just curious what you think of the science being done by humans on the ISS? Mostly a waste, or does it provide some useful scientific knowledge? Is there anything being gained from the human residents there, or are they superfluous?
What science? They spend 99% of their time keeping the plumbing and air recycling equipment functional. And almost none of the science they're doing couldn't be done just as effectively by robots.
Ok, yeah, I think I can agree that the ISS can be seen as a boondoggle. But surely they have learned something useful about the effects of long term weightlessness on human physiology? Or is that part of the "almost none"?
--
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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun May 09, 2021 5:49 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 5:31 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:52 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:38 pm


Just curious what you think of the science being done by humans on the ISS? Mostly a waste, or does it provide some useful scientific knowledge? Is there anything being gained from the human residents there, or are they superfluous?
What science? They spend 99% of their time keeping the plumbing and air recycling equipment functional. And almost none of the science they're doing couldn't be done just as effectively by robots.
Ok, yeah, I think I can agree that the ISS can be seen as a boondoggle. But surely they have learned something useful about the effects of long term weightlessness on human physiology? Or is that part of the "almost none"?
Well, that's not terribly useful information except in the context of humans in space.

In any case, it's not that we haven't learned anything. It's about costs and benefits. And IMO the costs of the ISS and other man-in-space efforts have vastly outweighed the benefits.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun May 09, 2021 7:39 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 5:49 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 5:31 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 4:52 pm

What science? They spend 99% of their time keeping the plumbing and air recycling equipment functional. And almost none of the science they're doing couldn't be done just as effectively by robots.
Ok, yeah, I think I can agree that the ISS can be seen as a boondoggle. But surely they have learned something useful about the effects of long term weightlessness on human physiology? Or is that part of the "almost none"?
Well, that's not terribly useful information except in the context of humans in space.

In any case, it's not that we haven't learned anything. It's about costs and benefits. And IMO the costs of the ISS and other man-in-space efforts have vastly outweighed the benefits.
Of course, many would say the same thing for the (unmanned) JWST. But not me! :ssmile:
--
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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun May 09, 2021 8:05 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 7:39 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 5:49 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 5:31 pm


Ok, yeah, I think I can agree that the ISS can be seen as a boondoggle. But surely they have learned something useful about the effects of long term weightlessness on human physiology? Or is that part of the "almost none"?
Well, that's not terribly useful information except in the context of humans in space.

In any case, it's not that we haven't learned anything. It's about costs and benefits. And IMO the costs of the ISS and other man-in-space efforts have vastly outweighed the benefits.
Of course, many would say the same thing for the (unmanned) JWST. But not me! :ssmile:
At ten times the cost, it would still be worth it.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Mercury-Redstone 3 Launch (2021 May 07)

Post by Wadsworth » Sun May 09, 2021 10:15 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 8:05 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 7:39 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun May 09, 2021 5:49 pm

Well, that's not terribly useful information except in the context of humans in space.

In any case, it's not that we haven't learned anything. It's about costs and benefits. And IMO the costs of the ISS and other man-in-space efforts have vastly outweighed the benefits.
Of course, many would say the same thing for the (unmanned) JWST. But not me! :ssmile:
At ten times the cost, it would still be worth it.

I can find some logic in both of your arguments. I feel that the majority of endeavors which humanity seeks out have their intrinsic value. Robotic and manned space travel should hold value as much as anything else we’ve set out to do, and succeeded in. I also think the time was right in the 60’s,70’s, etc. for the Government to pave the way where no private enterprise could. And now the time is ripe for private enterprise to take the lead and push forward.

Following the various robotic exploration missions and rovers has been quite exciting, but it will be spellbinding on an entirely different level to follow the first manned Mars exploration crew.

It is ingrained in us (at least some of us) to find out what is just over the next hill, the next mountain, the next planet. And put our ‘boots’ there.

-Nick-