APOD: The SAR and the Milky Way (2023 Nov 11)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
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APOD: The SAR and the Milky Way (2023 Nov 11)

Post by APOD Robot » Sat Nov 11, 2023 5:05 am

Image The SAR and the Milky Way

Explanation: This broad, luminous red arc was a surprising visitor to partly cloudy evening skies over northern France. Captured extending toward the zenith in a west-to-east mosaic of images from November 5, the faint atmospheric ribbon of light is an example of a Stable Auroral Red (SAR) arc. The rare night sky phenomenon was also spotted at unusually low latitudes around world, along with more dynamic auroral displays during an intense geomagnetic storm. SAR arcs and their relation to auroral emission have been explored by citizen science and satellite investigations. From altitudes substantially above the normal auroral glow, the deep red SAR emission is thought to be caused by strong heating due to currents flowing in planet Earth's inner magnetosphere. Beyond this SAR, the Milky Way arcs above the cloud banks along the horizon, a regular visitor to night skies over northern France.

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Ann
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Re: APOD: The SAR and the Milky Way (2023 Nov 11)

Post by Ann » Sat Nov 11, 2023 8:10 am

I find today's APOD confusing:

SARarcLooten1024[1].jpg
APOD 11 November 2023 annotated.png
The Milky Way is "broken" and the nebulas are in the wrong place.

The Milky Way looks "broken" in today's APOD. I've never seen it look like that.

And as for the two prominent nebulas, they look like the North America Nebula (NGC 7000) and IC 1396 to me. The Andromeda galaxy is also in the APOD. But the position of Andromeda in relation to the position of NGC 7000 and IC 1396 is also wrong.

APOD 25 August 2003 annotated.png
Credit: Jerry Lodriguss

Today's APOD is confusing. That's the word for it.

Ann
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Julien Looten
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Re: APOD: The SAR and the Milky Way (2023 Nov 11)

Post by Julien Looten » Sat Nov 11, 2023 9:11 am

Hello,

I am the author of the photograph. The shape of the Milky Way is quite normal. It is curved because of the (very large) panorama I had to make to get all these objects on the same image. In particular, an east-west panorama. This panorama causes deformations, which cannot be prevented. It's the same principle with the earth's planisphere: it's hard to make something flat when it's shaped like a sphere...

In your sketch, where you show that it's "broken", you're exaggerating. In fact, it's just curved (see image)...
f6303fc75f.jpeg
https://sendeyo.com/get/d/f6303fc75f
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Chris Peterson
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Re: APOD: The SAR and the Milky Way (2023 Nov 11)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sat Nov 11, 2023 2:51 pm

Ann wrote: Sat Nov 11, 2023 8:10 am I find today's APOD confusing:

SARarcLooten1024[1].jpg
APOD 11 November 2023 annotated.png
The Milky Way is "broken" and the nebulas are in the wrong place.

The Milky Way looks "broken" in today's APOD. I've never seen it look like that.

And as for the two prominent nebulas, they look like the North America Nebula (NGC 7000) and IC 1396 to me. The Andromeda galaxy is also in the APOD. But the position of Andromeda in relation to the position of NGC 7000 and IC 1396 is also wrong.

APOD 25 August 2003 annotated.png
Credit: Jerry Lodriguss

Today's APOD is confusing. That's the word for it.

Ann
I'd suggest that the road in the image is perfectly straight, extending in front of and behind the camera. Which might give a clue as to the nature of the projection here, and the consequent distortion it produces.
Chris

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Rauf
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Re: APOD: The SAR and the Milky Way (2023 Nov 11)

Post by Rauf » Sat Nov 11, 2023 5:10 pm

Julien Looten wrote: Sat Nov 11, 2023 9:11 am Hello,

I am the author of the photograph. The shape of the Milky Way is quite normal. It is curved because of the (very large) panorama I had to make to get all these objects on the same image. In particular, an east-west panorama. This panorama causes deformations, which cannot be prevented. It's the same principle with the earth's planisphere: it's hard to make something flat when it's shaped like a sphere...

In your sketch, where you show that it's "broken", you're exaggerating. In fact, it's just curved (see image)...

f6303fc75f.jpeg
https://sendeyo.com/get/d/f6303fc75f
Hello! Fantastic picture :)

Can I ask what time was it when you captured this panorama?

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orin stepanek
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Re: APOD: The SAR and the Milky Way (2023 Nov 11)

Post by orin stepanek » Sat Nov 11, 2023 9:12 pm

SARarcLooten1024[1].jpg
Lovely; Kudos Jeff!
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