APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan 15)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
Posts: 3484
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan 15)

Post by APOD Robot » Sat Jan 15, 2011 5:06 am

Image A Total Eclipse at the End of the World

Explanation: Would you go to the end of the world to see a total eclipse of the Sun? If you did, would you be surprised to find someone else there already? In 2003, the Sun, the Moon, Antarctica, and two photographers all lined up in Antarctica during an unusual total solar eclipse. Even given the extreme location, a group of enthusiastic eclipse chasers ventured near the bottom of the world to experience the surreal momentary disappearance of the Sun behind the Moon. One of the treasures collected was the above picture -- a composite of four separate images digitally combined to realistically simulate how the adaptive human eye saw the eclipse. As the image was taken, both the Moon and the Sun peaked together over an Antarctic ridge. In the sudden darkness, the magnificent corona of the Sun became visible around the Moon. Quite by accident, another photographer was caught in one of the images checking his video camera. Visible to his left are an equipment bag and a collapsible chair.

<< Previous APODDiscuss Any APOD Next APOD >>
[/b]

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 18138
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by bystander » Sat Jan 15, 2011 5:49 am

Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

Eamonn Shute

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by Eamonn Shute » Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:11 am

Realistically? The picture looks very phoney. The moon cannot appear darker than the sky, and the artificial blackening really grates with me.

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15812
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by neufer » Sat Jan 15, 2011 12:32 pm

APOD Robot wrote:Image A Total Eclipse at the End of the World

Quite by accident, another photographer was caught in one of the images checking his video camera.
Visible to his left are an equipment bag and a collapsible chair.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
[Finnegans Wake 5.28] It may half been a missfired brick, as some say,
or it mought have been due to a collupsus of his back promises, as others looked at it.
(There extand by now one thousand and one stories, all told, of the same).
Last edited by neufer on Sat Jan 15, 2011 2:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Art Neuendorffer

Manu61

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by Manu61 » Sat Jan 15, 2011 12:43 pm

Oh no, this lousy photoshop job again.

ani

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by ani » Sat Jan 15, 2011 2:08 pm

Now that is really special. Many thanks.

User avatar
Beyond
500 Gigaderps
Posts: 6889
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:09 am
Location: BEYONDER LAND

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by Beyond » Sat Jan 15, 2011 3:37 pm

Just goes to show that no matter where, or what you are taking a picture of, there's going to be someone you didn't plan on, getting into the shot :!:
Shouldn't the Title be -- A Total Eclipse at the Bottom of the World :?: It does look nice though. Although i would also like to see what the original picture looks like, even if it is upside down. (i just have to learn how to read better!)
Last edited by Beyond on Sat Jan 15, 2011 6:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4681
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by orin stepanek » Sat Jan 15, 2011 4:00 pm

I think the photo looks pretty good! Has anyone watched the video?
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
And I love this picture of Anartica!
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap991116.html
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

SimonTelescopium
Asternaut
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 4:48 pm

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by SimonTelescopium » Sat Jan 15, 2011 4:54 pm

Here are more images from this 2003 eclipse by Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society http://cmhas.wikispaces.com/ECLIPSE_Antarctica

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15812
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by neufer » Sat Jan 15, 2011 5:14 pm

orin stepanek wrote:I think the photo looks pretty good! Has anyone watched the video?
Two problems with observing from a plane:
1) It's a little noisy
2) You can't impress the natives with your eclipse forecast.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBBpVIUn8To&NR=1[/youtube]
Art Neuendorffer

jasizle@gmail.com

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by jasizle@gmail.com » Sat Jan 15, 2011 6:01 pm

This is by far the worst photo i have ever seen on this forum! who took the day off?

visitor

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by visitor » Sat Jan 15, 2011 6:43 pm

What motive could the editors have for pulling out this stinker again? Maybe to stir the pot a little and get some blood up. No one minds composite tinkering for pictures that cannot be seen in any other way but solar eclipses have been seen through the ages with the naked eye by standing on planet Earth and looking up. Why show someone standing there viewing the eclipse and show an eclipsed sun that looks like it was cut out of black paper by a child?

User avatar
Indigo_Sunrise
Science Officer
Posts: 430
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 1:40 pm
Location: SoMd

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by Indigo_Sunrise » Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:13 pm

TO: 'visitor', 'jasizle', 'Manu61', and 'Eamonn Shute'

If you do not like the image, how about going somewhere else?
Sure this image is a repeat, but it's still an interesting one.
Oh, and I must reiterate:

TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY!



:roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
Forget the box, just get outside.

kalix

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by kalix » Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:23 pm

i thought i had seen this picture somewhere before (or one like it) and it was deemed to be fake(?). and can the antarctic really have an eclipse, anyway, with the pattern of travel of the sun and the moon?

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15812
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by neufer » Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:31 pm

I LOVE THIS APOD !!!
Unlike other 'ARTSY-SMARTSY' APODs (and you know who I mean :wink: ) there is
a detailed account of how it was all obtained (a small portion of which is given below).

Hats off to Fred Bruenjes for all his hard work :!:
http://www.moonglow.net/eclipse/2003nov23/index.html wrote:
The 2003 Antarctic Total Solar Eclipse
November 23, 2003 by Fred Bruenjes
<<At right is a satellite image of the area I visited. This map covers roughly 300km from top to bottom, and North is to the upper left. A red X marks the site where I observed the eclipse from. The area is in among the Institut Geologii Arktiki Rocks. The cigar shaped rock outcrop just above the X is the Schirmacher Oasis, where the Russian Novolazarevskaya base and the Indian Maitri base are located. I overflew the bases, but didn't have time for a ground visit. Between the Oasis and the X is the ice runway I landed on. The darker blue color is bare exposed ice, the snow has been blown off by the fierce katabatic winds. At top left is the ocean, littered with sea ice and icebergs. Just inland at the top middle is India's old Dakshin Gangotri base (too small to be visible in this image). Near the bottom left of the image in a small bluish patch is the Blue-1 ice runway. At bottom right are the Wohlthat / Drygalski Mountains. The lower-right-most mountain in the image is about where the Lazarev meteorite was found. It was the first iron meteorite found in Antarctica, in 1961. I don't know of any meteorites found in the area since then.

After dinner (horrible cold tasteless stuff) we headed for the eclipse site. I went in the advance team with Vic & Jen Winter, David & Wendee Levy, Bob Shambora, and some other folks I don't know. We drove in a tracked vehicle that belongs to the Indians, a slow vehicle that took an hour to make the trip.

Upon arriving at the site there was a problem, South wasn't where it was when Jen surveyed the site in February. A large rise would block our view of the eclipse. To come all this way, spend all this money, have perfect weather, and miss the eclipse because of a snowbank would not do. We could not move south or west due to crevasses. East was no better. So that left north, we started hiking that way in the hope that as we got further from the ridge we would see over it better. We arrived at a suitable place only about 30 minutes before totality.

There was no time left to set up all of the equipment I had brought, so I had to prioritize and set up whatever I could. It was so bone-chillingly cold that batteries and cameras were dying left and right. Put a fresh battery in and it's dead within minutes. My fancy Meade LXD55 tracking mount decided it was in the northern hemisphere and refused to track the sun in the correct direction. Oh well.

The seeing was absolutely terrible, on the order of several arcminutes. Extinction was about two stops (25% of the Sun's light was making it through the atmosphere, a really large amount and a testament to the extremely clean air here). David Levy spotted shadow bands around 10 minutes before totality, an exceptional amount of time. This is the first time I have ever seen shadow bands. They looked like a shadow of smoke. We could see the Moon's shadow coming in well to the left of the Sun. The anti-solar shadow was huge and black all the way to the horizon, I wish I could have gotten a picture of that (the camera died due to cold).

As totality approached I blindly took pictures with my cameras, hoping to get something. Because we had backed up from the designated observing site there was someone in my field of view. You can see him just left of the sun. This is the second contact diamond ring, you can see some red prominences and whitish corona. I have corrected the color to remove the reddening that comes from the low solar altitude, to better show the prominences. The ridge was still high enough to block part of the sun.
Image
Just after second contact we could see some nice prominences. The wind was so strong that it shook my sturdy mount and blurred many of my images. The sharpest photos I have come from my video camera, as shown at right. This image is an average of the 30 best frames in two seconds of video. I used a JVC JY-HD10U hidef video camera, with a 3X Kenko teleconverter, and Registax software to select and average frames. Then curves, saturation, and resize in Photoshop.

Totality was wonderful, I concentrated on observing visually while working cameras with the back of my mind. My binoculars were out of focus and I had a hard time adjusting them because of the cold. Looking around, I did not see any aurora. There was some spatial variation in sky brightness but nothing I would consider aurora. I could only see two radii of corona. The corona was orange or brown near the horizon, changing to a greenish tinge up higher.

The framed image below is a highly processed composite of four images that's intended to be a more artistic representation of what the eclipse felt like. I have increased the color saturation slightly to better show the green thru red corona colors, otherwise the image is truthful. (For an unprocessed single image click here, or here for a detailed explanation of how the image was created.) In the processed image the coronal streamers and polar brushes really come out. The person in the photo is the Japanese painter and illustrator Kagaya. He was set up directly in front of me. I didn't notice him before the eclipse because of the intense sunlight, so it was a complete accident that he was in my photo. At left is his "freight bag", a large soft suitcase in which we placed our cold weather gear, tripods, and so forth. Next to that is a collapsible chair, with his sleeping bag laying on it. At the moment of this photo he was leaning over to take a picture with his camera. I am very happy that Kagaya was in my photo, it makes the composition much more interesting.>>
Art Neuendorffer

visitor

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by visitor » Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:16 pm

Indigo_Sunrise wrote:TO: 'visitor', 'jasizle', 'Manu61', and 'Eamonn Shute'
If you do not like the image, how about going somewhere else?


Take it easy, please. Some of us have dissenting views of photos and perhaps those views should be debated without telling us to get out.

Fred Bruenjes is a great photographer but perhaps he understands that not all his photos are equally enjoyed. It is my belief that this photo was a great set-up but the straight lines of the blocked sun do little to enhance the photo, at least for me. The editors are crazy about it.

We all love composite photos when it improves the picture.

Now, let me have it, Indigo.

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15812
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by neufer » Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:31 pm

visitor wrote:
It is my belief that this photo was a great set-up but the straight lines of the blocked sun do little to enhance the photo, at least for me.
Art Neuendorffer

visitor

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by visitor » Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:43 pm

Thanks, Neufer. That helps.

User avatar
NoelC
Creepy Spock
Posts: 876
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2005 2:30 am
Location: South Florida, USA; I just work in (cyber)space

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by NoelC » Sat Jan 15, 2011 10:51 pm

My first thought in looking at it was that it was a poor Photoshop job, but then I dummied up a version that had the central portion the sky color instead...

That looked just plain weird!

It's a great shot from a great spot, and if I started with a blue "disk" I might have considered blacking it out too!

-Noel

starswarm magellan

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by starswarm magellan » Sun Jan 16, 2011 12:06 am

In the UTube video posted by Orin Stepanek, the guy says that viewing an eclipse from a plane is better than sex. Naturally, I figure he's just doing it wrong. Later we learn that he is a NY gynecologist. I'm not sure what my point is.

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15812
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by neufer » Sun Jan 16, 2011 12:51 am

starswarm magellan wrote:
In the UTube video posted by Orin Stepanek, the guy says that viewing an eclipse from a plane is better than sex. Naturally, I figure he's just doing it wrong. Later we learn that he is a NY gynecologist. I'm not sure what my point is.
Those were two different guys.
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
DavidLeodis
Perceptatron
Posts: 1169
Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 1:00 pm

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by DavidLeodis » Sun Jan 16, 2011 6:15 pm

In the explanation it states the eclipse was an "unusual total solar eclipse". I would be grateful if someone could please let me know what it was about this eclipse that resulted in it being unusual. I thought all total solar eclipses had the same cause and so none could be in any way unusual, but I am clearly wrong. Thanks.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 18138
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by bystander » Sun Jan 16, 2011 6:23 pm

It was over Antarctica.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

User avatar
DavidLeodis
Perceptatron
Posts: 1169
Joined: Mon May 01, 2006 1:00 pm

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by DavidLeodis » Sun Jan 16, 2011 6:54 pm

bystander wrote:It was over Antarctica.
Thanks bystander.

From the use of "unusual" in the explanation I thought there must have been something very different about the eclipse compared to all other solar eclipses. It was a poor word to have used in my opinion without at least stating in the explanation why it was unusual. I had not thought it was referring to the area where the eclipse was seen. I assume therefore that for some reason such an event is so rare over Antarctica that it is considered "unusual".

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 15812
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: A Total Eclipse at the End of the World (2011 Jan

Post by neufer » Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:08 pm

DavidLeodis wrote:
From the use of "unusual" in the explanation I thought there must have been something very different about the eclipse compared to all other solar eclipses. It was a poor word to have used in my opinion without at least stating in the explanation why it was unusual. I had not thought it was referring to the area where the eclipse was seen. I assume therefore that for some reason such an event is so rare over Antarctica that it is considered "unusual".
I don't think that total eclipses over Antarctica are that much rarer than total eclipses over other continents of the world.

It is just that few, if any, people have observed total eclipses over Antarctica before 2003.
(It's a tree falling in the forest kinda thing.)
Art Neuendorffer