APOD Retrospective: June 16 - Anniversary Issue

A nostalgic look back at Astronomy Picture of the Day
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APOD Retrospective: June 16 - Anniversary Issue

Postby bystander » Thu Aug 11, 2011 6:38 am



Happy Anniversary, APOD!


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2015
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Apologies to: Vermeer's Astronomer and Geographer;
Image Pixelation: Rob Stevenson

Welcome to the vicennial year of the Astronomy Picture of the Day! Perhaps a source of web consistency for some, APOD is still here. As during each of the 20 years of selecting images, writing text, and editing the APOD web pages, the occasionally industrious Robert Nemiroff (left) and frequently persistent Jerry Bonnell (right) are pictured above plotting to highlight yet another unsuspecting image of our cosmos. Although the featured image may appear similar to the whimsical Vermeer composite that ran on APOD's fifth anniversary, a perceptive eye might catch that it has been digitally re-pixelated using many of the over 5,000 APOD images that have appeared over APOD's tenure. (Can you find any notable APOD images?) Once again, we at APOD would like to offer a sincere thank you to our readership for continued interest, support, and many gracious communications. If you consider yourself a fan of APOD, you might want to consider joining the Friends of APOD.



2014
Image Credit: Stuart Lowe, LCOGT/Virtual Sky

The first APOD appeared 19 years ago today. To help celebrate, APOD brings you today an all-sky heatmap of (nearly) 19 years of APOD entries. The brighter a region appears on the above heatmap, the more APODs that occur in that region. Clicking anywhere on the map will bring up a link to all APODs, if any, that appear nearby. We at APOD again thank our readers, NASA, astrophotographers, volunteers who translate APOD daily into over 20 languages, volunteers who run APOD's over 20 mirror sites, volunteers who answer questions and administer APOD's main discussion board, and volunteers who run and update APOD's social media sites and smartphone applications for their continued support.



2013
The first APOD appeared eighteen years ago today, on 1995 June 16. Although garnering only 14 pageviews on that day, we are proud to estimate that APOD has now served over one billion space-related images over the past eighteen years. That early beginning, along with a nearly unchanging format, has allowed APOD to be a consistent and familiar site on a web frequently filled with change. Many people don't know, though, that APOD is now translated daily into many major languages. We again thank our readers, astrophotographers, and NASA for their continued support, but ask that any potentially congratulatory e-mail go this year to the volunteers all around the world who translate APOD's captions daily, many times with considerable effort. Some APOD images are featured in the above spectacular collage visualizing APOD as a classic film reel, submitted by an APOD enthusiast skilled in digital image manipulation. How many APOD images can you identify?



2012
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Image Credit & Copyright: Judy Schmidt

The first APOD appeared seventeen years ago today, on 1995 June 16. Although garnering only 14 page views on that day, we are proud to estimate that APOD has now served over one billion space-related images over the last 1.7 decades. That early beginning, along with a nearly unchanging format, has allowed APOD to be a consistent and familiar site on a web frequently filled with change. Many people don't know, though, that APOD is now translated daily into many major languages and featured on social media sites and smartphone applications. We again thank our readers and NASA for their continued support, as well as the folks who created the great pictures -- many times with considerable effort -- that APOD has been fortunate enough to feature over the years. Many can be contacted by following links found in the credit line under the image. Today's birthday collage includes numerous galaxies captured by the Hubble Space Telescope.



2011
The robotic MESSENGER spacecraft recently completed over 100 orbits of Mercury. MESSENGER's cameras have recorded detailed pictures utilizing eight different colors across visible and near infrared light, exploring the surface composition and looking for clues to the history and evolution of the solar system's innermost planet. This sharp image combines three of the MESSENGER wide angle camera's colors, but in exaggerated fashion. Otherwise, to the unaided human eye, Mercury's surface colors would appear comparatively muted. The image is about 1,000 kilometers across and features as small as a single kilometer are discernible at the original resolution. Today, the MESSENGER project will release new images and science findings from the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury.



2010
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Apologies to: Vermeer's Astronomer and Geographer;
Image Pixelation: Rob Stevenson

Welcome to the quindecennial year of the Astronomy Picture of the Day! Perhaps a source of web consistency for some, APOD is still here. As during each of the 15 years of selecting images, writing text, and editing the APOD web pages, the occasionally industrious Robert Nemiroff (left) and frequently persistent Jerry Bonnell (right) are pictured above plotting to highlight yet another unsuspecting image of our cosmos. Although the above image may appear similar to the whimsical Vermeer composite that ran on APOD's fifth anniversary, a perceptive eye might catch that this year it has been digitally re-pixelated using many of the over 5,000 APOD images that have appeared over APOD's tenure. (Can you find any notable APOD images?) Once again, we at APOD would like to offer a sincere thank you to our readership for continued interest, support, and many gracious communications.



2009
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Credit & Copyright: Tahir Sisman
On the occasion of our 14th anniversary

Is the Moon larger when near the horizon? No -- as shown above, the Moon appears to be very nearly the same size no matter its location on the sky. Oddly, the cause or causes for the common Moon Illusion are still being debated. Two leading explanations both hinge on the illusion that foreground objects make a horizon Moon seem farther in the distance. The historically most popular explanation then holds that the mind interprets more distant objects as wider, while a more recent explanation adds that the distance illusion may actually make the eye focus differently. Either way, the angular diameter of the Moon is always about 0.5 degrees. In the above time-lapse sequence of the Moon taken in 2007, with one exposure taken to bring up the foreground of Izmit Bay in Turkey.

On the occasion of our 14th anniversary, the APOD editors thank all of our contributors and mirror site operators whose volunteer efforts help bring the wonders of astronomy to millions of people around the world. Additional thanks also go to our Turkish mirror site operators for submitting the above mouseover image.



2008
Almost every object in the above photograph is a galaxy. The Coma Cluster of Galaxies pictured above is one of the densest clusters known - it contains thousands of galaxies. Each of these galaxies houses billions of stars - just as our own Milky Way Galaxy does. Although nearby when compared to most other clusters, light from the Coma Cluster still takes hundreds of millions of years to reach us. In fact, the Coma Cluster is so big it takes light millions of years just to go from one side to the other! The above mosaic of images of a small portion of Coma was taken in unprecedented detail by the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate how galaxies in rich clusters form and evolve. Most galaxies in Coma and other clusters are ellipticals, although some imaged here are clearly spirals. The spiral galaxy on the upper left of the above image can also be found as one of the bluer galaxies on the upper left of this wider field image. In the background thousands of unrelated galaxies are visible far across the universe.



2007
To prepare for the Apollo landings, five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft were launched during 1966 and 1967 to gather detailed images of our fair planet's large, natural satellite. Dramatic views returned by the spacecraft cameras included this stark moonscape. The mosaic of 93 kilometer wide impact crater Copernicus features central peaks rising above the crater floor and rugged crater walls.

Note: As of today, June 16, the APOD editors have enjoyed presenting images from space missions, major observatories, and professional and amateur cosmic tourists alike for twelve years. A sincere thanks to our web site operators, translators, and to all for the gracious email and continued APOD submissions!



2006
The first APOD appeared eleven years ago today, on 1995 June 16. Although garnering only 14 page views on that day, we are proud to estimate that APOD has now served over 400 million space-related images over the last eleven years. That early beginning, along with a nearly unchanging format, has allowed APOD to be a consistent and familiar site on a web frequently filled with change. Many people don't know, though, that APOD is now translated daily into many major languages. We again thank our readers and NASA for their continued support, but ask that any potentially congratulatory e-mail go to the folks who created the great pictures -- many times with considerable effort -- that APOD has been fortunate enough to feature over the past year. Many can be contacted by following links found in the credit line under the image. Some of these images are featured in the above spectacular collage of a fantasy sky above Mars submitted by an enthusiastic APOD reader skilled in digital image manipulation. How many APOD images can you identify?



2005
Welcome to the eleventh year of Astronomy Picture of the Day! In a decade of editing the APOD web pages, the industrious Robert Nemiroff (left) and persistent Jerry Bonnell (right) have enjoyed exploring compelling images of the cosmos that are not limited to those taken from earth orbit, much less to those taken by professional astronomers. In fact, seen in this recently released Vermeer, the editors are extremely grateful for the continued large volume of gracious e-mail and APOD submissions. Today, they would like to offer a sincere thank you to all. And while these APOD editors are definitely not getting any younger, tomorrow's picture may actually be ...



2004
Elliptical galaxy M87 is a type of galaxy that looks much different than our own Milky Way Galaxy. Even for an elliptical galaxy, though, M87 is peculiar. M87 is much bigger than an average galaxy, appears near the center of a whole cluster of galaxies known as the Virgo Cluster, and shows an unusually high number of globular clusters. These globular clusters are visible as faint spots surrounding the bright center of M87. In general, elliptical galaxies contain similar numbers of stars as spiral galaxies, but are ellipsoidal in shape (spirals are mostly flat), have no spiral structure, and little gas and dust. The above image of M87 was taken recently by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on top of the dormant volcano Mauna Kea in Hawaii, USA.



2003
The first APOD appeared eight years ago today, on 1995 June 16. To date, we estimate that APOD has now served over 100 million space-related images. We again thank our readers and NASA for their continued support, but ask that any potentially congratulatory e-mail go to the folks who created the great pictures -- many times with considerable effort -- that APOD has been fortunate enough to feature over the past year. Many can be contacted by following links found in the credit line under the image. Some of these images are featured in the above spectacular collage submitted by an enthusiastic APOD reader well skilled in digital image manipulation. She challenges fellow APODees to find in the collage her favorite ex-member of the musical group Tangerine Dream.



2002
Why does Jupiter have rings? Jupiter's rings were discovered in 1979 by the passing Voyager 1 spacecraft, but their origin was a mystery. Data from the Galileo spacecraft currently orbiting Jupiter later confirmed that these rings were created by meteoroid impacts on small nearby moons. As a small meteoroid strikes tiny Adrastea, for example, it will bore into the moon, vaporize, and explode dirt and dust off into a Jovian orbit. Pictured above is an eclipse of the Sun by Jupiter, as viewed from Galileo. Small dust particles high in Jupiter's atmosphere, as well as the dust particles that compose the rings, can be seen by reflected sunlight.



2001
Welcome to the seventh year of Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD). Editors Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell are extremely grateful for the continued large volume of gracious e-mail and APOD submissions (and also for the "occasional" critical note!). Today we would like to offer a very sincere thank you to all. We are certainly proud that each day over the last six years APOD has consistently coupled an expanding universe of hypertext with inspiring images of the cosmos. In fact, tomorrow's picture might actually be ...



2000
Welcome to the sixth year of Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD)! Above are the industrious Robert Nemiroff (left) and persistent Jerry Bonnell (right), still engaged in creating the APOD web pages. As suggested by imagery in this recently released Vermeer, APOD's origins derive from many dramatic, intellectual deliberations over the ultimate value of the World Wide Web. In our view, the WWW has evolved into a significant and still growing collective human resource and we think it's important to contribute. We are extremely grateful for the continued large volume of gracious e-mail and APOD submissions. Today we would like to offer a very sincere thank you to all. We are certainly proud that each day over the last five years APOD has consistently coupled an expanding universe of hypertext with inspiring images of the cosmos. In fact, tomorrow's picture might actually be ...



1999
Sometimes lightning occurs out near space. One such lightning type is the recently documented red sprite lightning, which has only been photographed and studied on Earth over the last few years. The origins of all types of lightning remains unknown, and scientists are even trying to figure out why red sprite lightning occurs at all. What is known is that as some large, positive cloud-to-ground lightning strokes occur, millisecond flashes appearing red may also occur far above in the upper atmosphere. Pictured above, a group of red sprites was photographed at high resolution. Reasons for the observed complexities are being researched.



1998
The Sun is a busy place. This false-color image depicts an active region near an edge of the Sun. Hot plasma is seen exploding off the Sun's photosphere and traveling along loops defined by the Sun's magnetic field. The red regions are particularly hot, indicating that some magnetic field loops carry hotter gas than others. These active loops were so large that the Earth could easily fit under one. The TRACE satellite was launched in April with plans to continue high-resolution imaging as the Sun passes Solar Maximum in the next few years.



1997
The first Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) appeared two years ago today. Pictured above is a scene surrounding the creation of an early APOD, depicting the famous astronomer Tycho Brahe demonstrating a celestial globe to Emperor Rudolph II. The image of a possible optical counterpart to a gamma-ray burst appears on the back wall. In Tycho's day, humanity discovered the nature of the Earth and the geometry of the Solar System. The times we live in are even more fascinating as we explore the nature of our Solar System and the geometry of our whole universe. APOD continues to chronicle these events by finding, presenting ,and annotating the most important astronomical pictures of our time, and cataloging them in an indexed and searchable archive. Link to APOD and discover the cosmos! With over five million pages served, we thank NASA, Michigan Tech, USRA, and most of all our readers, for their continued support.



1996
The first Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) appeared one year ago today. Pictured above are Robert Nemiroff (left) and Jerry Bonnell (right), engaged in creating the APOD web pages. APOD started over speculative conversations on the ultimate value of the World Wide Web. In our (current) view, the WWW is the closest thing yet to an "Encyclopedia of Humanity," and we think it's important to contribute. We are proud to say that APOD has now annotated most of the famous astronomical pictures of our time and has made them available to the general public in an indexed and searchable archive. During it's first year, APOD's main daily picture page has been served over one million times. But APOD's mission continues. As space science progresses more pictures, fresh insights, and new educative links become available. Therefore, so long as public interest and NASA support continue, APOD will continue. We thank all whose gracious e-mail are continually a source of encouragement.



1995
If the Earth could somehow be transformed to the ultra-high density of a neutron star , it might appear as it does in the above computer generated figure. Due to the very strong gravitational field, the neutron star distorts light from the background sky greatly. If you look closely, two images of the constellation Orion are visible. The gravity of this particular neutron star is so great that no part of the neutron star is blocked from view - light is pulled around by gravity even from the back of the neutron star.



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Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

chaharon

Re: APOD Retrospective: June 16 - Anniversary Issue

Postby chaharon » Sat Jun 16, 2012 4:49 am

:ssmile:

Ekaper

Re: APOD Retrospective: June 16 - Anniversary Issue

Postby Ekaper » Sat Jun 16, 2012 10:14 pm

Funny to notice that June 16 is APOD's anniversary as well. I turned 42 today. Curious what this Ultimate Question of Life, The Universe and Everything is all about;-)

thecos@telia.com

Re: APOD Retrospective: June 16 - Anniversary Issue

Postby thecos@telia.com » Tue Jun 16, 2015 7:24 pm

Hello,
a pensioned teacher and astronomer from Sweden
is very impressed by today's APOD-celebration. Nice!
After enlargening some times I found my favorite photo,
the first color picture of dear old Earth
from moon orbit with Apollo 8, Christmas 1968.
...just in front of Jerry Bonnells mouth.
Have a nice day! // Tord


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