APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

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APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby APOD Robot » Wed Apr 25, 2012 4:06 am

Image Meteor Over Crater Lake

Explanation: Did you see it? One of the more common questions during a meteor shower occurs because the time it takes for a meteor to flash is typically less than the time it takes for a head to turn. Possibly, though, the glory of seeing bright meteors shoot across and knowing that they were once small pebbles on another world might make it all worthwhile, even if your observing partner(s) could not share in every particular experience. Peaking over the past few days, a dark moonless sky allowed the Lyrids meteor shower to exhibit as many as 30 visible meteors per hour from some locations. A bright Lyrid meteor streaks above picturesque Crater Lake in Oregon, USA, in the above composite of nine exposures taken last week. Snow covers the foreground, while the majestic central band of our home galaxy arches well behind the serene lake. Other meteor showers this year include the Perseids in mid-August and the Leonids in mid-November, both expected to also dodge the glare of a bright Moon in 2012.

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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby Beyond » Wed Apr 25, 2012 4:14 am

Those observing partners are really c-o-o-l cats :?:
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby neufer » Wed Apr 25, 2012 5:26 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Man_of_the_Lake wrote:
Image
<<The Old Man of the Lake is the name given to a 30-foot tall tree stump, most likely a hemlock, which has been bobbing vertically in Oregon's Crater Lake since at least 1896. At the waterline, the stump is about 2 feet in diameter and stands approximately 4 feet above the water. The surface has been bleached white by the elements. The exposed end of the floating tree is splintered and worn but wide and buoyant enough to support a person's weight.

Fontinalis, a moss that is present in the waters of Crater Lake at a depth of 394 feet, also grows on the Old Man of the Lake, the only place the moss is found near the surface.

Joseph S. Diller published the first geology of Crater Lake in 1902, the same year the area became a national park. In his work, Diller briefly describes a great stump in the lake that he had found six years earlier. Thus, in 1896, The Old Man floated just as it does at present, giving it a documented age of more than one hundred years.

Movements of The Old Man have long been observed. In 1896, Diller established that The Old Man could travel, by tying baling wire around the log and pulling it a short distance. Five years later, Diller observed the Old Man to be 0.25 miles from where he had previously noted its location. The earliest known photograph of the trunk dates to this period.

As the result of an inquiry from Washington, D.C. as to its precise location, the project of recording The Old Man's location was undertaken between July 1 and September 30, 1938. Those observations indicated that The Old Man of Crater Lake travels quite extensively, and sometimes with surprising rapidity. Since it can be seen virtually anywhere on the lake, boat pilots commonly communicate its position to each other as a general matter of safety. During one three-month period of observation in 1938, The Old Man traveled at least 62.1 miles. Not surprisingly, the days on which the greatest movements occurred were days of relatively high wind and waves. In 1988, submarine explorations were conducted in the lake, and the scientists decided to tie The Old Man off the eastern side of Wizard Island to neutralize the navigational hazard until their research work was complete.>>
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby Henchard » Wed Apr 25, 2012 9:09 am

There have been several magnificent pictures of the home galaxy recently, all with it bending across the sky. Has anyone thought of using a photo improver to stretch a complete picture of it, end to end, in its horizontal state? I would love to see one.
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby Indigo_Sunrise » Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:32 am

Beautiful image! Nice job, Brad Goldpaint!



*and Beyond - you said what I was going to! (about 'cool cats'....) :lol:

8-)
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby orin stepanek » Wed Apr 25, 2012 12:52 pm

I thought todays APOD was neat!
Beyond wrote:Those observing partners are really c-o-o-l cats :?:
emo30.gif

They're really cute too! 8-) :wink:
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby geckzilla » Wed Apr 25, 2012 1:13 pm

orin stepanek wrote:I thought todays APOD was neat!
Beyond wrote:Those observing partners are really c-o-o-l cats :?:
emo30.gif

They're really cute too! 8-) :wink:


Haha, I love those cats. This guy makes so many videos of them. http://www.youtube.com/user/shironekoshiro
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby Chris Peterson » Wed Apr 25, 2012 2:21 pm

Henchard wrote:There have been several magnificent pictures of the home galaxy recently, all with it bending across the sky. Has anyone thought of using a photo improver to stretch a complete picture of it, end to end, in its horizontal state? I would love to see one.

There are a number of photomosaics of the Milky Way that have been produced in recent years.
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby Ann » Wed Apr 25, 2012 3:09 pm

I like the picture. It's a fine portrait of the Milky Way. I like how the yellow color of the bulge of the Milky Way - located between Nunki, Shaula and the Lagoon Nebula in the annotated image - contrasts with the bluer parts of our galaxy's arms. Admittedly the bulge is likely reddened in this image, since it is so close to the horizon.

By the way, thank you so much for providing an annotated image! :D

It was interesting to learn about Crater Lake. The "Old Man" in it was fascinating.

Like everyone else, I love the cats. Thanks to geckzilla for providing a link to more pictures and videos of these cats.

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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby Dan S. » Wed Apr 25, 2012 6:18 pm

In what way were the nine images combined into this "composite"? Were they stitched together side by side to get a wider angle view, and/or was the meteor added from a separate photo, and/or were the sky and foreground photographed separately?
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photopic sky survey (Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake)

Postby Anthony Barreiro » Wed Apr 25, 2012 6:42 pm

Henchard wrote:There have been several magnificent pictures of the home galaxy recently, all with it bending across the sky. Has anyone thought of using a photo improver to stretch a complete picture of it, end to end, in its horizontal state? I would love to see one.

Amateur astrophotographer Nick Risinger, accompanied and supported by his father and brother, travelled repeatedly between the northern and southern hemispheres to create an amazing all sky panorama. Here's a story about it from Sky & Telescope:

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/communit ... 86019.html

And here is Risinger's website with the 5000 megapixel image in two different formats:

http://skysurvey.org/

Today's apod is a beautifully composed picture, by the way -- foreground, sky, and meteor are all gorgeous.
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby goldpaintphoto » Wed Apr 25, 2012 7:13 pm

Dan S. wrote:In what way were the nine images combined into this "composite"? Were they stitched together side by side to get a wider angle view, and/or was the meteor added from a separate photo, and/or were the sky and foreground photographed separately?

Dan,

9 images were stitched together in order to obtain a wider field of view. During these exposures the meteor made its appearance. Technically, the sky and foreground were photographed separately. One shot for the sky, one for the horizon, and one for the lower foreground portion x3.

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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby Devil Particle » Wed Apr 25, 2012 7:26 pm

I'm glad you can see Denab in this picture.
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby ta152h0 » Wed Apr 25, 2012 7:28 pm

I am willing to wait six months to get the other half, with a meteor or not !
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby DavidLeodis » Thu Apr 26, 2012 11:44 am

I wonder what day "last week" this nice composite photo was acquired? The annotated version (brought up when moving a cursor over the APOD) was very helpful. :)

Edit added a few hours later:- I have now managed to find the image's Exif data and in that it states "Date Created 2012:04:21 01:53:19.092". I guess the time may be the first or last of the nine images used to produce the composite, but it still seems likely that all may have been taken in the early hours of April 21 2012.
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby goldpaintphoto » Thu Apr 26, 2012 8:59 pm

DavidLeodis wrote:I wonder what day "last week" this nice composite photo was acquired? The annotated version (brought up when moving a cursor over the APOD) was very helpful. :)

Edit added a few hours later:- I have now managed to find the image's Exif data and in that it states "Date Created 2012:04:21 01:53:19.092". I guess the time may be the first or last of the nine images used to produce the composite, but it still seems likely that all may have been taken in the early hours of April 21 2012.

David,

You are correct. All images were taken from 1:37am - 1:53am PST on April 21, 2012.

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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby ta152h0 » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:54 pm

just imagine those guys on the other end of the galaxy going to have to wait 20000 years to see this ( plus a cloudless night, I might add. Pass me a cold one please
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Re: APOD: Meteor Over Crater Lake (2012 Apr 25)

Postby DavidLeodis » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:57 pm

goldpaintphoto wrote:
DavidLeodis wrote:I wonder what day "last week" this nice composite photo was acquired? The annotated version (brought up when moving a cursor over the APOD) was very helpful. :)

Edit added a few hours later:- I have now managed to find the image's Exif data and in that it states "Date Created 2012:04:21 01:53:19.092". I guess the time may be the first or last of the nine images used to produce the composite, but it still seems likely that all may have been taken in the early hours of April 21 2012.

David,

You are correct. All images were taken from 1:37am - 1:53am PST on April 21, 2012.

Brad Goldpaint


Thank you Brad. Your help is greatly appreciated. Lovely photo.

David. :)
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