APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

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APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by APOD Robot » Wed Jul 11, 2012 4:06 am

Image A Morning Line of Stars and Planets

Explanation: Early morning dog walkers got a visual treat last week as bright stars and planets appeared to line up. Pictured above, easily visible from left to right, were the Pleiades open star cluster, Jupiter, Venus, and the "Follower" star Aldebaran, all seen before a starry background. The image was taken from the Atacama desert in western South America. The glow of the rising Sun can be seen over the eastern horizon. Jupiter and Venus will continue to dazzle pre-dawn strollers all over planet Earth for the rest of the month, although even now the morning planets are seen projected away from the line connecting their distant stellar sky mates.

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by Ann » Wed Jul 11, 2012 4:23 am

That's a very beautiful picture! :D

The almost perfect line-up of these celestial objects at very different distances from us is fascinating and very lovely. This picture brings out the lovely color contrast between the Pleiades and the Hyades, but also the color contrast between the Pleiades and the other objects. It brings out the similarity in apparent color between Jupiter and Venus, which is interesting in itself.

I love the fact that Venus is seen right in front of the Hyades. The sprinkling of Hyades stars around Venus makes it look as if Venus was a mighty elliptical galaxy surrounded by globulars.

The elegant sprinkling of background stars all over the sky, creating curving lines and elegant patterns, is very satisfying in itself. The fact that this is a southern hemisphere photo means that the sky is "upside down" to me, and it becomes much harder to spot the constellations. But I think that is Zeta and Omicron Persei, two B-type giants, to the lower left of the Pleiades. And at far left I think we have Peta Persei (Algol, the famous variable star) and Rho Persei, an M3 giant.

What a beautiful picture!

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by ta152h0 » Wed Jul 11, 2012 4:26 am

the Big Poobah of the Skies gives us another sterling performance by his children.
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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by bactame » Wed Jul 11, 2012 5:24 am

From the shores of Lake Michigan with binoculars Venus is especially striking because the crescent Moon and crescent Venus seem to compliment each other.

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by neufer » Wed Jul 11, 2012 7:48 am

Indigo_Sunrise wrote:
This is a gorgeous image! 8-)

Where are all the naysayers/whiners/complainers -
the ones that cried so loudly yesterday about wanting to look at an astronomy image - now??!!?!?
It's true that this is a gorgeous image. I did enjoy it.

But, yes, sorry there's a but, it's not terribly relevant to the science of astronomy.

The name of this site is Astronomy Picture Of the Day
and not Astrology Picture Of the Day.

Even though I liked the pleasant image I would prefer if you all would stick with Astronomical subjects.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_dance wrote:
<<A line dance is a choreographed dance with a repeated sequence of steps in which a group of people dance in one or more lines or rows without regard for the gender of the individuals, all facing the same direction, and executing the steps at the same time. Line dancers are not in physical contact with each other. Although line dancing is associated with country-western music and dance, it has a similarities to folk dancing. Many folk dances are danced in unison with dancers arranged in one or more rows and often connected with the dancers next to them; while these rows are described as "lines," they may curve, corner, or otherwise be nonlinear in the geometric sense. The Balkan countries, among others, have a rich tradition of line dance surviving to the present. The absence of a physical connection between dancers is, however, a distinguishing feature of country western line dance. Line dances have accompanied many popular music styles since the early 1970s including pop, swing, rock and roll, disco, Latin (Salsa Suelta), and Jazz.>>
Last edited by neufer on Wed Jul 11, 2012 12:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by Indigo_Sunrise » Wed Jul 11, 2012 12:00 pm

This is a gorgeous image!
8-)








*Where are all the naysayers/whiners/complainers - the ones that cried so loudly yesterday about wanting to look at an astronomy image - now??!!?!?
:ninja:
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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by Beyond » Wed Jul 11, 2012 12:53 pm

It would appear that neufer has caused a glitch in time. It appears that he has quoted Indigo_Sunrise before Indigo_Sunrise posted.
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by orin stepanek » Wed Jul 11, 2012 1:07 pm

Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by neufer » Wed Jul 11, 2012 1:17 pm

Beyond wrote:
It would appear that neufer has caused a glitch in time.
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/a-stitch-in-time.html wrote:
<<The first person to state unambiguously that 'a stitch in time saves nine' was the English astronomer Francis Baily (28 April 1774 – 30 August 1844) in a Journal of his tour in the unsettled parts of North America, written in 1797 and published in 1856 by Augustus De Morgan:
  • 'After a little while we acquired a method of keeping her [a boat] in the middle of the stream, by watching the moment she began to vary, and thereby verifying the vulgar proverb, '"A stitch in time saves nine."'
Francis Baily's observations of "Baily's Beads", during an annular eclipse of the sun on 15 May 1836, started the modern series of eclipse expeditions. The phenomenon, which depends upon the irregular shape of the moon's limb, was so vividly described by him as to attract an unprecedented amount of attention to the total eclipse of 8 July 1842, observed by Baily himself at Pavia.

In other work, he completed and discussed H. Foster's pendulum experiments, deducing from them an ellipticity for the earth of 1/289.48. This value was corrected for the length of the seconds-pendulum by introducing a neglected element of reduction, and was used, in 1843, in the reconstruction of the standards of length. His laborious operations for determining the mean density of the earth, carried out by Henry Cavendish's method (1838–1842), yielded the authoritative value of 5.66.>>
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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by TxAg » Wed Jul 11, 2012 2:45 pm

With all the complaints over a free website over the last two days, I suggest you finish out July with lolcats and rickrolls just to spite all of the ungrateful leeches.

Harry TenHerons

Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by Harry TenHerons » Wed Jul 11, 2012 4:58 pm

Magnificent !

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by ta152h0 » Wed Jul 11, 2012 5:32 pm

I think it is very relevant to astronomy. It is the phases Venus displayed that allowed our ancestors to figure out the Sun is the center of the now called Solar System.
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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by Anthony Barreiro » Wed Jul 11, 2012 6:11 pm

APOD Robot wrote:The glow of the rising Sun can be seen over the eastern horizon.
And if you look very closely, you can see a line of people dancing happily over the horizon, with one big goofy white guy out of step.
May all beings be happy, peaceful, and free.

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Are you a good Wittich or a bad Wittich?

Post by neufer » Wed Jul 11, 2012 6:32 pm

ta152h0 wrote:
I think it is very relevant to astronomy.
It is the phases Venus displayed that allowed our ancestors to figure out the Sun is the center of the now called Solar System.
It is the phases Venus displayed that allowed our ancestors to figure out the Sun is the center of Venus.
  • Assuming, that is, that one can actually see the phases of Venus in this APOD.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Wittich wrote: <<Paul Wittich (c.1546 – 9 January 1586) was a German mathematician and astronomer whose Capellan geoheliocentric model, in which the inner planets Mercury and Venus orbit the sun but the outer planets Mars, Jupiter and Saturn orbit the Earth, may have directly inspired Tycho Brahe's more radically heliocentric geoheliocentric model in which all the 5 known primary planets orbited the Sun, which in turn orbited the stationary Earth. :arrow:

Wittich was born in Breslau, Silesia, and studied at the universities of Leipzig, Wittenberg and Frankfurt. About 1580 Wittich stayed with Tycho Brahe on his island Hven in Öresund, where he worked at his Uraniborg.

It is evident from Wittich's diagram of his Capellan system that the Martian orbit does not intersect the solar orbit nor those of Mercury and Venus, and would thus be compatible with solid celestial orbs, with the Solar orb containing the orbs of Venus and of Mercury and itself in turn wholly circumscribed by a Martian orb. This was in significant contrast with Ursus's geoheliocentric model in which the orbits of Mercury and Venus intersect the Martian orbit but the Solar orbit does not, and also with the Tychonic model in which the Martian orbit also intersects the Solar orbit in addition to those of Mercury and Venus, and whereby both these models rule out solid celestial orbs that cannot interpenetrate, if not excluding interpenetrating fluid orbs. [Get it? (Got it.) Good!]

However, Wittich's Capellan model of the Martian orbit contradicted Copernicus's model in which Mars at opposition is nearer to the Earth than the Sun is, whereby if true the Solar and Martian orbits must intersect in all geoheliocentric models. Thus the question of whether the daily parallax of Mars was ever greater than that of the Sun was crucial to whether Wittich's model was observationally tenable or not. It seems Tycho Brahe eventually came to the conclusion by 1588 that Mars does come nearer to the Earth than the Sun is, albeit contradicting his earlier conclusion by 1584 that his observations of Mars at opposition in 1582-3 established it had no discernible parallax, whereas he put the Sun's parallax at 3 arcminutes. Thus Brahe's 1588 model crucially contradicted both Wittich's and also Ursus's geoheliocentric models at least in respect of the dimensions of the Martian orbit, by positing its intersection with the Solar orbit.

Having failed to find any Martian parallax greater than the Solar parallax, Tycho had no valid observational evidence for his 1588 conclusion that Mars comes nearer to the Earth than the Sun, and nor did anybody else at that time, whereby Tycho's uniquely distinctive geoheliocentric model had no valid observational support in this respect. It seems its credibility rested solely upon his aristocratic social status rather than any scientific evidence. And this failure to find any Martian parallax in effect also refuted Copernicus's heliocentric model in respect of its Martian orbit, and supported the geocentric models of Ptolemy and the Capellan geoheliocentric model of Wittich.

It seems a primary purpose of Wittich's Capellan model, evident from the drafting markings in his drawing, was to save the integrity of solid celestial orbs, and the only planetary models compatible with solid celestial orbs were the Ptolemaic, Copernican and Wittichan Capellan planetary models. But in 1610 Galileo's novel telescopic confirmation that Venus has a full set of phases like the Moon, published in his 1613 Letters on Sunspots, refuted the Ptolemaic geocentric model, which implied they are only crescents in conjunction, just as in opposition, whereas they are gibbous or full in conjunction. This crucial novel fact was logically implied by the Heraclidean, Capellan and Tychonic geoheliocentric planetary models, according to all of which at least the orbits of Venus and Mercury are centred on the Sun rather than the Earth, as well as by the pure heliocentric model. Consequently this left only the Copernican and Wittichan Capellan models compatible with both solid orbs and the phases of Venus. But only the Wittichan system was also compatible with the failure to find any stellar parallax predicted by all heliocentric models, in addition to also being compatible with the failure to find any Martian parallax that refuted both the Copernican and Tychonic models.

Thus by 1610 it seems the only observationally tenable candidate for a planetary model with solid celestial orbs was Wittich's Capellan system. Indeed it also seems it was even the only planetary model that was generally observationally tenable, given the twin failures to find any stellar annual parallax nor any Martian daily parallax at that time. However, insofar as it was accepted that comets are superlunary and sphere-busting, whereby solid celestial orbs are impossible and thus intersecting orbits cease to be impossible, then this thereby also admitted the model of Ursus as also observationally tenable, along with Wittich's Capellan system, whilst the Ptolemaic model was ruled out by the phases of Venus, all heliocentric models by the perceived absence of any annual stellar parallax, and both the Copernican and Tychonic models were also refuted by the absence of any Martian daily parallax. Renowned anti-Copernican adherents of the Capellan planetary model included Francis Bacon, inter alia, and this model appealed to those who accepted Ptolemy's purely geocentric model was refuted by the phases of Venus, but were unpersuaded by Tychonic arguments that Mars, Jupiter and Saturn also orbited the Sun in addition to Mercury and Venus.

Indeed even Newton's arguments for this stated in his commentary on Phenomenon 3 of Book 3 of his Principia were notably invalid.
>>
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by Greyhawk » Wed Jul 11, 2012 7:10 pm

I think you need to go on a holiday out of your rear end for a while.

Honestly, just wow...even when APOD posts a picture with planets in it your not happy..

neptunium

Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by neptunium » Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:09 pm

Unlike some people :arrow: , I think this APOD is quite beautiful. I would like to see this straight-line conjunction myself.

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by neufer » Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:22 pm

Greyhawk wrote:
I think you need to go on a holiday out of your rear end for a while.

Honestly, just wow...even when APOD posts a picture with planets in it your not happy..
  • 1) It was satire

    2) I rather liked the Matt Harding video...
    ... a lot of complicated dynamics going on there (unlike today's APOD).
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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by LocalColor » Wed Jul 11, 2012 9:52 pm

Very nice photo - thank you.

BrovoBrovo

Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by BrovoBrovo » Wed Jul 11, 2012 10:56 pm

Testing to see if i can post today. Unable to post yesterday. Don't know if it is my name, email address, length of post or something the bot did not like in the post. :|

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by Anthony Barreiro » Wed Jul 11, 2012 11:10 pm

neptunium wrote:Unlike some people :arrow: , I think this APOD is quite beautiful. I would like to see this straight-line conjunction myself.
Neptunium, you can still see all these objects in the early morning sky, about an hour before sunrise. Look to the east. Bright Venus and Jupiter will jump out at you. Venus has moved a couple of degrees east of Aldebaran, and will continue moving east day by day, but otherwise the positions of the Pleiades, Jupiter, the Hyades, and Aldebaran are the same as in the photo. The angle of the line-up relative to the horizon will be different depending on your latitude north or south of the equator. Over the next few days the waning crescent moon will approach and pass through this part of the sky, making for more beauty, and possibly another apod (especially if we can get Matt to dance with the daughters of Pleione).
May all beings be happy, peaceful, and free.

BrovoBrovo

Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by BrovoBrovo » Wed Jul 11, 2012 11:17 pm

Interesting - my post was accepted to yesterdays discussion using the BrovoBrovo name but not my real name. :? Sorry I was unable to get the post in yesterday but at least it is on page 5 now, a day late and a payment short and without all the edits since I didn't expect the post to post.

I like today's APOD (yesterdays too), and thank the Core Group of posters for putting knowledge with the pretty pictures. I was unaware of the inner v outer planet orbit theory which gave another thought to how the solar system worked.

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Re: APOD: A Morning Line of Stars and Planets (2012 Jul 11)

Post by DavidLeodis » Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:31 pm

What a gorgeous sight to see such a lot of stars. In my light polluted suburban area even on a clear night only the brightest stars can readily be made out. I hope such telescopically pristine viewing areas like that in the APOD can be preserved for as long as possible.