APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

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APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by APOD Robot » Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:05 am

Image A Solar Eclipse Quilt

Explanation: Some people are so inspired by solar eclipses that they quilt. Pictured above is a resulting textile from one such inspiration. The 38x38 inch quilt offers impressions of a total annular eclipse, when the Moon is too far from the Earth to cover the entire Sun, witnessed in Spain in October of 2005. Today, however, a full total solar eclipse will occur, although it will only be visible to eclipse chasers and those who live in a thin swath of Australia. For a few minutes, those near the center of the eclipse path will see the entire Sun blocked by the Moon, causing the day to become unusually dark. Just before -- and just after -- totality occurs, sunlight may stream between mountains on the Moon's edge creating a diamond ring effect. The next total eclipse of the Sun will occur in November 2013.

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by bystander » Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:15 am

The Total Solar Eclipse Down Under
How to Watch it from Anywhere in the World
Universe Today | Nancy Atkinson | 2012 Nov 13
Slooh will be having their webcast at events.Slooh.com, starting Tuesday, November 13th at 11:30 AM PST / 2:30 PM EST / 19:30 UTC. Viewers can watch the show on their PC or mobile device and will have the ability to ask questions to the Slooh team, including the crew located in Cairns, using the Slooh Conversations section on the Slooh homepage. Viewers will also be able to snap the live pictures directly from the Slooh homepage using Pinterest.

Another feed will be from the Cairns Eclipse 2012 Ustream channel, broadcast from over Cairns and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia
http://www.ustream.tv/CairnsEclipse2012

This channel will be live from 11 a.m. PT (2 p.m. ET) on Nov. 13, and 5 am November 14th 2012 (AEST)

Still another feed will be the Panasonic channel: Broadcast from Sheraton Mirage Port Douglas Resort:
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/panasonic ... ar-power-1

Panasonic’s project, described as, “Filming the Sun, using the Sun” aims to capture and broadcast to the world a solar eclipse using only the power of sunlight. They’re using Panasonic’s high efficiency solar power-generating system, “HIT” to generate power with a portable battery back for power storage. They’ll then be able to broadcast the eclipse images captured on a Lumix GH2.

We’ll be embedding a few of the feeds when they go live.
http://asterisk.apod.com/viewtopic.php?t=29954
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by JohnD » Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:51 am

Interesting!
Rotate that 180 degrees, and you have an alternative, occult, Stars and Stripes!
Subversive, or what?

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by zbvhs » Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:34 pm

Solar eclipses are fun. Light filtering through trees casts thousands of little pinhole images of the eclipsed Sun all over the ground. With a small hand mirror, you can cast an image of the event on the side of a building. You don't need to look directly at it to view the eclipse.
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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by emc » Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:56 pm

Beautiful Ms Winkelman! I especially like the yellow and blue!

APOD’s dimensions are showing. :D 8-)

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by BDanielMayfield » Tue Nov 13, 2012 1:17 pm

bystander wrote:The Total Solar Eclipse Down Under
How to Watch it from Anywhere in the World
Universe Today | Nancy Atkinson | 2012 Nov 13
Slooh will be having their webcast at events.Slooh.com, starting Tuesday, November 13th at 11:30 AM PST / 2:30 PM EST / 19:30 UTC. Viewers can watch the show on their PC or mobile device and will have the ability to ask questions to the Slooh team, including the crew located in Cairns, using the Slooh Conversations section on the Slooh homepage. Viewers will also be able to snap the live pictures directly from the Slooh homepage using Pinterest.

Another feed will be from the Cairns Eclipse 2012 Ustream channel, broadcast from over Cairns and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia
http://www.ustream.tv/CairnsEclipse2012

This channel will be live from 11 a.m. PT (2 p.m. ET) on Nov. 13, and 5 am November 14th 2012 (AEST)

Still another feed will be the Panasonic channel: Broadcast from Sheraton Mirage Port Douglas Resort:
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/panasonic ... ar-power-1

Panasonic’s project, described as, “Filming the Sun, using the Sun” aims to capture and broadcast to the world a solar eclipse using only the power of sunlight. They’re using Panasonic’s high efficiency solar power-generating system, “HIT” to generate power with a portable battery back for power storage. They’ll then be able to broadcast the eclipse images captured on a Lumix GH2.

We’ll be embedding a few of the feeds when they go live.
http://asterisk.apod.com/viewtopic.php?t=29954
Thanks for all the helpfull links bystander. I hope to be able to watch one or more of these live feeds and I'd hate to miss it because of messing up the timing. I see your from Okalhoma, I too am in the Central Time Zone in Texas, under Daylight Savings TIme. At what local time for us will first contact occur in Cairns?
Just as zero is not equal to infinity, everything coming from nothing is illogical.

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by Ann » Tue Nov 13, 2012 1:29 pm

It's a lovely quilt, and I, too, am happy that this work of art and science could become an APOD.

I'm reminded of one of my acquaintances, Tora Greve. She is a solar eclipse addict, and she travels all over the globe to see them - she usually bags at least one eclipse every year. Tora is an artist, too. Here is a work of hers, showing an imaginary scene with a giant Jupiter in the background.

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by KCM » Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:00 pm

Whoa! Love this quilt. Just looking at it evokes the memories from the annular eclipse! Art is a excellent compliment to the science.

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by owlice » Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:33 pm

IIRC, this quilt was chosen for a show at the Smithsonian. Here's another astronomical quilt by Sherry.
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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by bystander » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:17 pm

BDanielMayfield wrote:Thanks for all the helpfull links bystander. I hope to be able to watch one or more of these live feeds and I'd hate to miss it because of messing up the timing. I see your from Oklahoma, I too am in the Central Time Zone in Texas, under Daylight Savings TIme. At what local time for us will first contact occur in Cairns?
You're still on Daylight Savings Time???

Anyway, according to this site, first contact in Cairns is about 5:45 am and last contact at 7:41 am with maximum at 6:40 am on Nov 14 Cairns local time. That is 19:45, 21:41 and 20:40 Nov 13 UT, or 1:45 pm, 3:41 pm, and 2:40 pm Nov 13 CST.
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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by florid_snow » Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:05 pm

Found this on the Port Douglas, Australia wikipedia page, it's a city in the path of totality.

The first ever Solar Eclipse Marathon is being organised in Port Douglas to coincide with the Total Solar Eclipse in November 2012.[citation needed] This 42.195 km Marathon will race over 2,000 competitors starting at 6:41am on the morning of 14 November as the first rays of the sun re-emerge from behind the moon thus incorporating the Eclipse as the worlds first intergalatic starting gun.[8]

Do you think we should tell them it isn't "intergalatic"? I love the idea though.

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Déjà vu all over again!

Post by neufer » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:02 pm

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/13/australia-solar-eclipse-clouds-skywatchers_n_2122338.html wrote:
Australia Solar Eclipse: Clouds May Block Skywatchers' View
By KRISTEN GELINEAU 11/13/12 12:53 AM ET EST AP

<<SYDNEY -- Tens of thousands of tourists, scientists and amateur astronomers who traveled from around the world to see a total solar eclipse in northern Australia may be getting shortchanged by the weather.

Forecasters were predicting cloudy skies around dawn Wednesday, when the moon will pass between the sun and Earth and plunge a slice of Australia's northeast into darkness. Many worried that they will miss a rare chance to view the celestial phenomenon. "There will be breaks in (the clouds), but it's just a matter of the luck of the draw whether you get a break at the right time," said Queensland state Bureau of Meteorology forecaster Andrew Mostyn. "It's a bit of bad luck."

The eclipse will cast its 150-kilometer (95-mile) wide shadow starting at dawn in Australia's Northern Territory and then cross the northeast tip of the country before swooping east across the South Pacific. No islands are in its direct path, so northern Australia is the only land where there's even a chance of seeing the full eclipse, said Geoff Wyatt, an astronomer with Sydney Observatory.

A partial eclipse will be visible from east Indonesia, the eastern half of Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and southern parts of Chile and Argentina. Totality – the darkness that happens at the peak of the eclipse – will last just over two minutes.

Among those sweating out the forecast was U.S. astronomer Jay Pasachoff, who traveled to Australia in hopes of viewing his 56th solar eclipse. Pasachoff, an astronomy professor at Williams College in Massachusetts, and a team of about 50 scientists and students have fanned out across the region to improve the odds that at least some of them will see the eclipse. The group is planning to study the sun's corona, the glowing white ring around the sun that is visible only during an eclipse. Despite the anxiety over the weather and the long journey to get there, Pasachoff said he wouldn't miss it. "Just imagine you were a heart surgeon and someone actually told you you could look inside a human heart only for two minutes, and only if you went halfway around the world," he said. "You would do it."

Some Queensland hotels have been booked up for more than three years and more than 50,000 people have flooded into the region to watch the solar spectacle, said Jeff Gillies, regional director of Queensland Tourism. Skygazers are planning to crowd beaches, boats, fields and hot air balloons to watch the event. Fitness fanatics will race in the Solar Eclipse Marathon, where the first rays of the sun re-emerging from behind the moon will serve as the starting gun. Some have already been partying for days at a weeklong eclipse festival.

Scientists will be studying how animals respond to the eclipse, with underwater cameras capturing the effects of sudden darkness on the creatures of the Great Barrier Reef. "It's an unknown with how they'll react," Gillies said. "A little bit of flora and fauna confusion, I would imagine." The last total solar eclipse visible in Australia was 10 years ago, in the South Australia Outback.>>
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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by bystander » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:06 pm

More live feeds (and a new site for Bad Astronomy)

Watch Today's Solar Eclipse Live!
Slate Blogs | Bad Astronomy | 2012 Nov 13
You can find lists of live webcasts at UniverseToday.com. Some of the better views will be at the Cairns Eclipse 2012 UStream channel, the Gloria Project, and — seriously — at a Cairns hot air balloon website. I have to add that weather is critical here; if it's cloudy then there won't be much of a view. But you should tune in just in case.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by BDanielMayfield » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:19 pm

You're still on Daylight Savings Time???
Apparently, I’m running on I.S.T. which in this case stands for Insufficient Sleep Time.

Thanks again,
Bruce
Just as zero is not equal to infinity, everything coming from nothing is illogical.

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by kokotic@sympatico.ca » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:40 pm

Have been enjoying APOD for years - thanks for the pictures!!! Like that you put a quilt on for the solar eclipse - variety is the very spice of life. Love the quilt!

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by bystander » Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:21 pm

Dual feed on facebook from Panasonic

Currently the feed from Fitzroy Island is excellent.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by Anthony Barreiro » Tue Nov 13, 2012 9:40 pm

florid_snow wrote:Found this on the Port Douglas, Australia wikipedia page, it's a city in the path of totality.

The first ever Solar Eclipse Marathon is being organised in Port Douglas to coincide with the Total Solar Eclipse in November 2012.[citation needed] This 42.195 km Marathon will race over 2,000 competitors starting at 6:41am on the morning of 14 November as the first rays of the sun re-emerge from behind the moon thus incorporating the Eclipse as the worlds first intergalatic starting gun.[8]

Do you think we should tell them it isn't "intergalatic"? I love the idea though.


I'm afraid I may be slowly absorbing the asteriskial curmudgeon gene, but I don't think it's a good idea to close the roads for a marathon on the same morning that eclipse watchers are trying to find the perfect spot to see the Moon and Sun over the hills and trees and through the passing clouds. It's a bit like putting chocolate frosting on a mushroom quiche -- they're both good things, but not at the same time.

By the way, this is a beautiful quilt, and I love seeing astronomically-inspired arts and crafts on apod.
May all beings be happy, peaceful, and free.

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Re: APOD: A Solar Eclipse Quilt (2012 Nov 13)

Post by neufer » Wed Nov 14, 2012 3:25 pm

http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/clouds-part-solar-eclipse-darkens-north-australia-1.1037732 wrote:
[img3="In this photo provided by Tourism Queensland, the moment of a total solar eclipse is observed at Cape Tribulation in Queensland state, Australia, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Tourism Queensland)

Cape Tribulation was named by British navigator Lieutenant James Cook on 10 June 1770 (log date) after his ship hit a reef as it passed over it, north east of the cape, at 6pm. This made Cook pull away from the coast, looking for deeper water. At 10.30pm, the Endeavour hit a reef almost sinking Cook's ship, on what is now named Endeavour Reef. Cook recorded "...the north point
[was named] Cape Tribulation because here began all our troubles".
"]http://www.ctvnews.ca/polopoly_fs/1.103 ... image.jpeg[/img3]
Clouds part, solar eclipse darkens north Australia
Solar eclipse seen in Australia, Nov. 14, 2012.
The Associated Press, Nov. 14, 2012 9:30AM EST

SYDNEY--<< From boats bobbing on the Great Barrier Reef, to hot air balloons hovering over the rainforest, and the hilltops and beaches in between, tens of thousands of scientists, tourists and amateur astronomers watched as the sun, moon and Earth aligned and plunged northern Australia into darkness during a total solar eclipse Wednesday.

Stubborn clouds that many feared would ruin the view parted -- somewhat -- in north Queensland, defying forecasts of a total eclipse-viewing bust and relieving spectators who had fanned out to glimpse the celestial phenomenon.

"Immediately before, I was thinking, `Are we gonna see this?' And we just had a fantastic display - it was just beautiful," said Terry Cuttle of the Astronomical Association of Queensland, who has seen a dozen total solar eclipses over the years. "And right after it finished, the clouds came back again. It really adds to the drama of it."

Spectators whooped and clapped with delight as the moon passed between the sun and Earth, leaving a slice of the continent's northeast in sudden darkness.

Starting just after dawn, the eclipse cast its 150-kilometre shadow in Australia's Northern Territory, crossed the northeast tip of the country and was swooping east across the South Pacific, where no islands are in its direct path. A partial eclipse was visible from east Indonesia, the eastern half of Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and southern parts of Chile and Argentina. Totality -- the darkness that happens at the peak of the eclipse -- lasted just over two minutes in the parts of Australia where it was visible.

Gloomy weather had left many eclipse-chasers who had traveled to Australia from around the globe anxious that they wouldn't be able to see a thing. But the clouds moved in time for many to watch as the moon blotted out the sun's rays and cast a shadow over the tropical landscape.

Hank Harper, 61, and his two children flew from Los Angeles just to see the eclipse, and feared the clouds would ruin their adventure. The three of them hopped on board a hot air balloon with other eager tourists and staff from Hot Air Balloon Cairns, crossed their fingers - and were rewarded with a perfect view.

"We gambled everything -- drove through the rain and didn't even know if the balloon was going to go up," he said by phone from the hot air balloon as he and Harrison, 10, and Reilly, 12, watched the sun's rays re-emerge from behind the moon while kangaroos hopped on the ground below. "It was everything I could have hoped for."

On a dive-boat drifting along the blue waters of the Great Barrier Reef, a cheer of relief erupted as the clouds moved away at the moment of total eclipse, followed by a hush as darkness fell across the water. One scuba diver floated on his back in the sea, watching the phenomenon unfold as he bobbed in the waves. Birds on a nearby island, startled by the sudden lack of light, began to stir.

"It was absolutely amazing. We were coming out this morning and there was a wee bit of cloud around and we were apprehensive," Adam O'Malley of the Passions of Paradise dive company said by phone from his boat. "We got a full view -- absolutely breathtaking."

Some Queensland hotels have been booked up for more than three years and more than 50,000 people flooded into the region to watch the solar spectacle, said Jeff Gillies, regional director of Queensland Tourism.

Skygazers crowded along palm-fringed beaches, fields and clifftops to watch the event through protective viewing glasses and homemade pinhole cameras that projected the sun's image onto makeshift screens. Fitness fanatics gathered for the Solar Eclipse Marathon, where the first rays of the sun re-emerging from behind the moon was the starting gun. Some began partying days ago at a weeklong eclipse festival.

Scientists were studying how animals respond to the eclipse, with underwater cameras capturing the effects of sudden darkness on the creatures of the Great Barrier Reef.

The next total solar eclipse won't happen until March 2015.>>
Art Neuendorffer