APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
Posts: 2998
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby APOD Robot » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:15 am

Image IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar

Explanation: Will this caterpillar-shaped interstellar cloud one day evolve into a butterfly-shaped nebula? No one is sure. What is sure is that IRAS 20324+4057, on the inside, is contracting to form a new star. On the outside, however, energetic winds are blowing and energetic light is eroding away much of the gas and dust that might have been used to form the star. Therefore, no one is sure what mass the resulting star will have, and, therefore, no one knows the fate of this star. Were the winds and light to whittle the protostar down near the mass of the Sun, the outer atmosphere of this new star may one day expand into a planetary nebula, possibly even one that looks like a butterfly. Alternatively, if the stellar cocoon retains enough mass, a massive star will form that will one day explode in a supernova. The eroding protostellar nebula IRAS 20324+4057 spans about one light year and lies about 4,500 light years away toward the constellation of the Swan (Cygnus). The above image of IRAS 20324+4057 was taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in 2006 but released last week. The battle between gravity and light will likely take over 100,000 years to play out, but clever observations and deductions may yet yield telling clues well before that.

<< Previous APOD This Day in APOD Next APOD >>

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 16325
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby bystander » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:24 am

Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

vai_d
Asternaut
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 10:34 am

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby vai_d » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:38 am

I am surprised to see that it is not called sperm nebula :P :wink:

FLPhotoCatcher
Science Officer
Posts: 132
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2012 6:51 am

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby FLPhotoCatcher » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:47 am

Why do they say that "IRAS 20324+4057, on the inside, is contracting to form a new star"? There is at least one (maybe three or four) stars inside the right side of the cloud. Wouldn't these stars themselves sweep away much of the dust, thus possibly preventing any new stars from forming?

Also, why was this image released seven years after it was taken, and not sooner?

User avatar
geckzilla
Ocular Digitator
Posts: 8652
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Location: Modesto, CA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby geckzilla » Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:16 am

FLPhotoCatcher wrote:Also, why was this image released seven years after it was taken, and not sooner?


Hubble takes a lot of pictures. Sometimes they just get buried.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

Boomer12k
:---[===] *
Posts: 2090
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:07 am

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Boomer12k » Wed Sep 04, 2013 7:05 am

It is the "Star Child" from "2001: A Space Odyssey"

Very interesting image...HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!! Well...someday...

:---[===] *

patcon

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby patcon » Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:56 am

Why are the gases blowing in the direction they are? What is causing the wind? Is there something else going on out to the "right" of where the protostar is?

Rathkennamike

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Rathkennamike » Wed Sep 04, 2013 12:55 pm

With the references to a possible Butterfly Nebula I would have thought it is the Caterpillar Nebula :ssmile:

BDanielMayfield
Don't bring me down
Posts: 1469
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2012 11:24 am
AKA: Bruce
Location: East Idaho

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby BDanielMayfield » Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:08 pm

bystander wrote: viewtopic.php?t=32010

That link bystander provided is fascinating too. From it I copy this:
This light-year-long knot of interstellar gas and dust resembles a caterpillar on its way to a feast. But the meat of the story is not only what this cosmic caterpillar eats for lunch, but also what's eating it. Harsh winds from extremely bright stars are blasting ultraviolet radiation at this "wanna-be" star and sculpting the gas and dust into its long shape.

The culprits are 65 of the hottest, brightest known stars, classified as O-type stars, located 15 light-years away from the knot, towards the right edge of the image. These stars, along with 500 less bright, but still highly luminous B-type stars make up what is called the Cygnus OB2 association. Collectively, the association is thought to have a mass more than 30,000 times that of our Sun.


So it’s the gang of 65 O and 500 B stars in the neighbourhood off camera to the right that are emitting the radiation that’s blowing the gas and dust away from this nebula. I found the fact that there are 65 O stars in its vicinity to be amazing, since main sequence O stars are so rare. Wikipedia says that O stars make up only 0.00003 % of all stars, which is good because they are all destined to go supernova at some point. I’m also glad that this object and more importantly the rowdy gang of 65 are 4,500 light years away!
"Happy are the peaceable ... "

User avatar
Beyond
500 Gigaderps
Posts: 6889
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:09 am
Location: BEYONDER LAND

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Beyond » Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:47 pm

BDanielMayfield wrote:So it’s the gang of 65 O and 500 B stars in the neighbourhood off camera to the right that are emitting the radiation that’s blowing the gas and dust away from this nebula. I found the fact that there are 65 O stars in its vicinity to be amazing, since main sequence O stars are so rare. Wikipedia says that O stars make up only 0.00003 % of all stars, which is good because they are all destined to go supernova at some point. I’m also glad that this object and more importantly the rowdy gang of 65 are 4,500 light years away!

65 destined Super Novas in the same area :?: Geeze :!: When they're ready, one will probably set all the others off and create one Big Supreme Nova, that will light up our night sky :!:
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 13287
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Chris Peterson » Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:50 pm

FLPhotoCatcher wrote:There is at least one (maybe three or four) stars inside the right side of the cloud.

How are you determining that?
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com

User avatar
BMAONE23
Commentator Model 1.23
Posts: 4076
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2005 6:55 pm
Location: California

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby BMAONE23 » Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:58 pm

Looks to me like a Cosmic Mud Puppy

User avatar
Ron-Astro Pharmacist
Resistored Fizzacist
Posts: 888
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 10:34 pm
AKA: Fred
Location: Idaho USA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Ron-Astro Pharmacist » Wed Sep 04, 2013 2:42 pm

As interesting as today's APOD is, and if there are seven more years of pictures yet to be released, we've got many treats ahead. Yesterdays APOD had a variety of beautifully colored stars very prominent in the photo. I'm curious why their diffraction spikes were eight as opposed to today's stars four? :?:

It made the picture yesterday quite striking.
Make Mars not Wars

User avatar
geckzilla
Ocular Digitator
Posts: 8652
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Location: Modesto, CA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby geckzilla » Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:16 pm

Ron-Astro Pharmacist wrote:As interesting as today's APOD is, and if there are seven more years of pictures yet to be released, we've got many treats ahead. Yesterdays APOD had a variety of beautifully colored stars very prominent in the photo. I'm curious why their diffraction spikes were eight as opposed to today's stars four? :?:


Today's image is from Hubble which always has four. Scott used a telephoto Canon lens which produces eight spikes. Different instruments, different diffraction spikes. (I like that alliteration.) Those things can be very annoying if you are photographing a bright star. They get huge and ugly rather than small and pleasing.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 13287
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Chris Peterson » Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:17 pm

Ron-Astro Pharmacist wrote:Yesterdays APOD had a variety of beautifully colored stars very prominent in the photo. I'm curious why their diffraction spikes were eight as opposed to today's stars four?

Today's image was made with the HST, which has a circular aperture obstructed by a secondary mirror supported by four vanes, which create the four diffraction spikes we see. Yesterdays image was made by an unobstructed aperture that wasn't circular, but had eight sides (determined by the type of iris in the camera lens). Thus the eight diffraction spikes.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 2846
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby starsurfer » Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:38 pm

FLPhotoCatcher wrote:Also, why was this image released seven years after it was taken, and not sooner?

Sometimes there can only be a public image release after the scientific study/paper has been published. The results of the study of this "tadpole" were published earlier last year: http://arxiv.org/abs/1201.2404

Sometimes an image can be published well before the results of the study have been published. An example is this Gemini image of the planetary nebula Sh2-71: http://www.gemini.edu/node/11815

User avatar
geckzilla
Ocular Digitator
Posts: 8652
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Location: Modesto, CA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby geckzilla » Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:41 pm

starsurfer wrote:
FLPhotoCatcher wrote:Also, why was this image released seven years after it was taken, and not sooner?

Sometimes there can only be a public image release after the scientific study/paper has been published. The results of the study of this "tadpole" were published earlier last year: http://arxiv.org/abs/1201.2404

Sometimes an image can be published well before the results of the study have been published. An example is this Gemini image of the planetary nebula Sh2-71: http://www.gemini.edu/node/11815


Oh yeah, the "proprietary data" that litters the HLA which I'm not allowed to use but can't seem to exclude it from the results. There's a radio selection button for excluding it but it is flaky.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

User avatar
LocalColor
Science Officer
Posts: 266
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 9:11 pm
Location: Central Idaho, USA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby LocalColor » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:20 pm

Stunning image - looks like a tadpole to us.

User avatar
Psnarf
Science Officer
Posts: 282
Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 6:19 pm

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Psnarf » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:21 pm

The Hubble site encourages folks to dig through the huge number of images to find interesting images. There aren't enough astronomers to even scratch the surface of the gazzillion images. The famous astronomer from the University of Arizona whose images frequenty grace the APOD site does just that. Except when he finds an interesting image in the Hubble database, he can add visual data from the telescopes to which he has access on Mount Lemmon (north of Tucson). He hosts public access to one of the telescopes on a regular basis so folks can explore and take images between oh-dark-thirty to midnight. (After midnight, that telescope is tasked with hunting for them pesky asteroids that ruin things for everyone.)
Sky Nights - http://skycenter.arizona.edu/

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 13287
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Chris Peterson » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:34 pm

geckzilla wrote:Oh yeah, the "proprietary data" that litters the HLA which I'm not allowed to use but can't seem to exclude it from the results. There's a radio selection button for excluding it but it is flaky.

There shouldn't be anything older than a year. The initiator of an HST image can normally request a publishing embargo for up to a year to allow time to prepare a paper, but after that period the data becomes public.

It is unlikely that today's image wasn't previously available, it was simply lost in all the other data.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com

User avatar
geckzilla
Ocular Digitator
Posts: 8652
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Location: Modesto, CA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby geckzilla » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:44 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:There shouldn't be anything older than a year. The initiator of an HST image can normally request a publishing embargo for up to a year to allow time to prepare a paper, but after that period the data becomes public.

It is unlikely that today's image wasn't previously available, it was simply lost in all the other data.


I run into unavailable data almost every time I search that's more than a year old. I just found a tantalizing set for NGC 7008 a few moments ago from 2009. It's UVIS so it is probably blobby and not suitable for aesthetic purposes but the available WFPC2 data cuts off the usual half of the object with its familiar stealth bomber shape and makes me wonder how the whole thing looks. Anyway, the details aren't important, but it is very common for me to run into them. Maybe it is possible to access the data through DADS but I've never tried it because it doesn't look like something I should be touching.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 13287
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Chris Peterson » Wed Sep 04, 2013 5:19 pm

geckzilla wrote:I run into unavailable data almost every time I search that's more than a year old.

Probably just missed. Anything that is NASA funded is in the public domain after the embargo. There may be slightly different rules where ESA is involved.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com

User avatar
geckzilla
Ocular Digitator
Posts: 8652
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Location: Modesto, CA

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby geckzilla » Wed Sep 04, 2013 5:27 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
geckzilla wrote:I run into unavailable data almost every time I search that's more than a year old.

Probably just missed. Anything that is NASA funded is in the public domain after the embargo. There may be slightly different rules where ESA is involved.


Looking at it closer, I realize that what I thought was proprietary isn't proprietary. But I'm still blocked from downloading it in the same way as the proprietary data. I don't understand why. This has frustrated me for a long time and I haven't found out who to ask about it. Equally frustrating is the lack of preview image. I'm not sure I would even want the data but I can't tell for sure because there's no preview.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 4469
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby orin stepanek » Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:14 pm

:D :D :wink:

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

Glennh

Re: APOD: IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar (2013 Sep 04)

Postby Glennh » Thu Sep 05, 2013 1:48 am

I'm not a trekkie but is not this, the "Dooms Day Machine" from the original Star Trek Series? :D


Return to “The Bridge: Discuss an Astronomy Picture of the Day”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest