APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

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APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by APOD Robot » Fri Jan 29, 2016 5:12 am

Image Hidden Galaxy IC 342

Explanation: Similar in size to large, bright spiral galaxies in our neighborhood, IC 342 is a mere 10 million light-years distant in the long-necked, northern constellation Camelopardalis. A sprawling island universe, IC 342 would otherwise be a prominent galaxy in our night sky, but it is hidden from clear view and only glimpsed through the veil of stars, gas and dust clouds along the plane of our own Milky Way galaxy. Even though IC 342's light is dimmed by intervening cosmic clouds, this deep telescopic image traces the galaxy's obscuring dust, blue star clusters, and glowing pink star forming regions along spiral arms that wind far from the galaxy's core. IC 342 may have undergone a recent burst of star formation activity and is close enough to have gravitationally influenced the evolution of the local group of galaxies and the Milky Way.

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Ann
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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by Ann » Fri Jan 29, 2016 5:31 am

Oh, IC 342 is a beauty! It's a prototypical Sc galaxy, quite similar to M74. Think how gorgeous it would look if it wasn't hidden behind all that Milky Way gas and dust!

This APOD is lovely!

Ann
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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by Boomer12k » Fri Jan 29, 2016 7:17 am

Wow...lots going on over there...beautiful image! Maybe...The Holiday Galaxy???

Is it a Starburst Galaxy? Could not find that out....

And thanks to Ann for the M74 shot... :ssmile:
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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by starsurfer » Fri Jan 29, 2016 9:16 am

I think it looks nice even with the dust in the way.

heehaw

Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by heehaw » Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:41 pm

starsurfer wrote:I think it looks nice even with the dust in the way.
I very much agree! It looks kind of bashful. We should encourage it!

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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by bls0326 » Fri Jan 29, 2016 2:13 pm

Makes a really busy picture.

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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by bystander » Fri Jan 29, 2016 3:12 pm

Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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Ann
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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by Ann » Fri Jan 29, 2016 4:30 pm

Boomer12k wrote:Wow...lots going on over there...beautiful image! Maybe...The Holiday Galaxy???

Is it a Starburst Galaxy? Could not find that out....

And thanks to Ann for the M74 shot... :ssmile:
:---[===] *
You're welcome!

IC 342 is not a starburst galaxy. You can tell it isn't just by looking at it. Note that it is well-ordered, with fine, quite regular spiral arms. There is not a lot of dust in IC 342, but the dust lanes are well-ordered and follow the regular shape of the spiral arms. We can see no signs that anything special is going on in the nucleus.

Starburst galaxies are typically dusty and often chaotic. Often the starburst itself is located in a rather small part of the galaxy, usually the nuclear region. It is not unusual that the parts of the galaxy outside the starburst are quite poor in star formation.

One nearby starburst galaxy is NGC 253. If you take a good look at the picture, you can see that NGC 253 is really quite dusty, and the dust is rather messy and chaotic. There is not a tremendous amount of star formation in the outer parts of the galaxy, but there is a starburst going on in the nuclear region.
NGC 5253. ESA/NASA/Hubble.
One of my own favorite starburst galaxies is the quite small galaxy NGC 5253. This is actually a so called BCD galaxy, a Blue Compact Dwarf galaxy. The nuclear starburst is very visible here, because the galaxy is almost dust-free. But you can spot a tendril of dust apparently leading straight into the heart of the starburst. Note that the starburst region is surrounded by a large, faint, reddish envelope of old red stars.
IC 10. Image: The Survey Team of the Lowell Observatory.






Another favorite starburst galaxy of mine is IC 10, which is actually a member of our own Local Group of galaxies. IC 10 is the only starburst member of the Local Group. You can see that the little galaxy looks quite contorted, and huge "blisters" of ionized gas are breaking out everywhere.








But the best-known starburst galaxy in the nearby universe is certainly M82. Almost everyone who takes any sort of interest in nearby galaxies is familiar with the Cigar Galaxy's amazing plumes of ionized red gas being jettisoned out of the galactic poles. There red plumes are the result of a nuclear starburst. Note that the disk of the galaxy appears to lack star formation altogether.

Well-behaved IC 342, on the other hand, is not a starburst galaxy.

Ann
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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by Guest » Sat Jan 30, 2016 2:25 am


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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by starsurfer » Sun Feb 07, 2016 6:00 pm

Ann wrote:
Boomer12k wrote:Wow...lots going on over there...beautiful image! Maybe...The Holiday Galaxy???

Is it a Starburst Galaxy? Could not find that out....

And thanks to Ann for the M74 shot... :ssmile:
:---[===] *
NGC 5253. ESA/NASA/Hubble.
One of my own favorite starburst galaxies is the quite small galaxy NGC 5253. This is actually a so called BCD galaxy, a Blue Compact Dwarf galaxy. The nuclear starburst is very visible here, because the galaxy is almost dust-free. But you can spot a tendril of dust apparently leading straight into the heart of the starburst. Note that the starburst region is surrounded by a large, faint, reddish envelope of old red stars.
Ann
Actually this image doesn't show the nuclear ionized outflow as it is only visible with Ha. This particular HST image only has exposures in the B, V and I filters. This is something I would love to see imaged by the CHART32 team! :D

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Re: APOD: Hidden Galaxy IC 342 (2016 Jan 29)

Post by starsurfer » Sun Feb 07, 2016 6:00 pm

Guest wrote: Even Malin 1, too...some. http://www.astrophoto.cl/images/gallery ... _small.jpg
The image in the link looks more like Malin 2?