APOD: Eclipse to Sunset (2016 Sep 07)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
Posts: 4477
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

APOD: Eclipse to Sunset (2016 Sep 07)

Post by APOD Robot » Wed Sep 07, 2016 4:09 am

Image Eclipse to Sunset

Explanation: September's eclipse of the Sun is documented in the 68 frames of this timelapse composite. Starting at 1pm local time a frame every 4 minutes follows the progress of the New Moon across the solar disk. Taken near the centerline of the narrow eclipse path, the series of exposures ends with a golden sunset. Balanced rock cairns in the foreground line a beach on the southern side of Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean, near the village of Etang-Salé. Of course, the close balance in apparent size creates drama in eclipses of the Sun by the Moon as seen from planet Earth. In an annular eclipse, the Moon's silhouette is just small enough to show the solar disk as a narrow ring-of-fire at maximum eclipse phase.

<< Previous APOD This Day in APOD Next APOD >>
[/b]

Boomer12k
:---[===] *
Posts: 2691
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:07 am

Re: APOD: Eclipse to Sunset (2016 Sep 07)

Post by Boomer12k » Wed Sep 07, 2016 6:08 am

A pile of rocks... a "pile" of Moons....

:---[===] *

User avatar
Fred the Cat
Theoretic Apothekitty
Posts: 753
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2016 4:09 pm
AKA: Ron
Location: Eagle, Idaho

Re: APOD: Eclipse to Sunset (2016 Sep 07)

Post by Fred the Cat » Wed Sep 07, 2016 4:21 pm

Those rocks, at their perfect balance points, reflect two other rocks and their hot neighbor. I kind of wish the full moon would rise further north all the time so it wouldn't be blocked by trees in my southern view.

Guess that wish would affect our balance more than I know. :wink:
Freddy's Felicity "Only ascertain as a cat box survivor"

FLPhotoCatcher
Science Officer
Posts: 196
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2012 6:51 am

Re: APOD: Eclipse to Sunset (2016 Sep 07)

Post by FLPhotoCatcher » Thu Sep 08, 2016 4:06 am

Scientists say that the moon stabilizes the rotation of the Earth, but what would Earth's rotation be like if the Moon was in a polar orbit? It seems very convenient and unlikely that the moon would have, after a planet crashed into Earth, ended up in an orbit so aligned with the ecliptic.
And will the moon continue to stabilize the Earth's rotation for as long as Earth lasts?

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 16214
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: Eclipse to Sunset (2016 Sep 07)

Post by Chris Peterson » Thu Sep 08, 2016 4:21 am

FLPhotoCatcher wrote:Scientists say that the moon stabilizes the rotation of the Earth, but what would Earth's rotation be like if the Moon was in a polar orbit? It seems very convenient and unlikely that the moon would have, after a planet crashed into Earth, ended up in an orbit so aligned with the ecliptic.
And will the moon continue to stabilize the Earth's rotation for as long as Earth lasts?
The Moon does not stabilize Earth's rotation. It stabilizes its axial tilt.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com

FLPhotoCatcher
Science Officer
Posts: 196
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2012 6:51 am

Re: APOD: Eclipse to Sunset (2016 Sep 07)

Post by FLPhotoCatcher » Thu Sep 08, 2016 4:25 am

Chris Peterson wrote:
FLPhotoCatcher wrote:Scientists say that the moon stabilizes the rotation of the Earth, but what would Earth's rotation be like if the Moon was in a polar orbit? It seems very convenient and unlikely that the moon would have, after a planet crashed into Earth, ended up in an orbit so aligned with the ecliptic.
And will the moon continue to stabilize the Earth's rotation for as long as Earth lasts?
The Moon does not stabilize Earth's rotation. It stabilizes its axial tilt.
Right, that's what I meant.

Rusty Brown in Cda

Re: APOD: Eclipse to Sunset (2016 Sep 07)

Post by Rusty Brown in Cda » Thu Sep 08, 2016 8:14 am

"... follow's the progress of..."
They're putting apostrophes in verbs now ?